When do kids start to hate reading?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by chebrutta, Jul 29, 2011.

  1. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

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    Jul 30, 2011

    I think that the love of reading is killed when we ask kids to read ABOVE their ability and comprehension level. It becomes a tedious task that makes them feel like a great, big failure.
     
  2. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Jul 30, 2011

    After last night's soapbox rant... lol....

    I agree with further posts, too- about ability and comprehension level. There are teachers who tell students to only read within their Lexile level as well, and I could never imagine that. School librarians even tend to hold back books that are above students' grade levels, but rarely do fourth graders, for example, read books that are only on a fourth grade level. Kids are curious about exploring different realms of literature.

    Then of course, technology is extremely prevalent. Smart phones like iPhones fascinate kids for long periods of time. Video games lull kids right into the action, and they often do not want to leave. Of course, movies are made about so many books these days (though I love some of the movies, I now feel strange about reading books like The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe... I actually stopped reading that book to my class after the movie came out... I want my kids to be exposed to literature that is new to them).
     
  3. montanadreaming

    montanadreaming Rookie

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    Jul 30, 2011

    After reading this thread it got me to thinking....At my school teachers will now read everything aloud in grades k - 6. The students will have their own copy of the book for each subject but the teachers will be the ones reading with students following along. If this is similar at most schools and students do not read aloud in school until they hit 6th/7th grade this could be why they start to not like reading. I cannot picture a student that goes K - 5/6 where the teachers reading everything going into middle school and being comfortable reading aloud. They would not be use to it.
     
  4. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    One thing I know about elementary kiddos and reading (from both experience and education) is that they need LOTS of turns, or opportunities to read aloud! Our literacy coach went from classroom to classroom last year, chose a single student from each classroom (during reading), and simply made a tally of each time the child got the opportunity to read aloud. The results were amazing! They ranged from 347 (my class :) ) down to 53 (5th grade) - all grades in our school share a simultaneous 120 minute reading block! Students who have more experience reading aloud generally do much better in reading in general.
     
  5. nstructor

    nstructor Cohort

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    Jul 30, 2011

    "Students who have more experience reading aloud generally do much better in reading in general"-P Whatley, where did you get this information from? There are many students who real fluently, but have no idea what they're reading, do you agree?
     
  6. hawkteacher

    hawkteacher Comrade

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    Jul 31, 2011

    Reading aloud how is my question?

    Reading aloud with a partner? Round robin style reading aloud?

    I think the type of reading aloud matters a lot. I agree that some reading aloud is important, but if one student is reading aloud while everyone else "listens" or "follows along" that's a lot of students NOT actually reading or doing the thinking required to understand the text.

    Maybe the difference in the importance of students reading aloud comes down to grade level? By the time students reach upper elementary, reading aloud gives them less access to text then silently reading.

    I think teacher read aloud is far more beneficial as it allows a class to get lost in the enjoyment of a book together, that would otherwise could be too difficult for independent reading. Students get to enjoy the text while hearing phrased and fluent reading, think alouds that highlight strategies good readers use, and get to have great discussion of a book with the class.
     
  7. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Jul 31, 2011

    I know when I've listened to audiobooks, I've still had to do some thinking to understand the text. I would say as much as when I read traditionally. Just like I've reread paragraphs, I've replayed the audio to hear what was said again. I also know that when I watch documentaries or serious films, I'm still doing a lot of thinking and processing.
     
  8. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Regarding reading aloud:
    Primary students who are still learning the mechanics of reading need many, many opportunities to read aloud, to hear themselves decoding and processing the letters into words with meaning. My students read high-frequency words aloud, spelling words, have lots of phonics practice, read phrases, sentences, and eventually, paragraphs and stories aloud. We do this in whole group, small group, and individual settings. I read to them extensively, modeling expression, phrasing, and interest in what I read. The only way I can know if they are correctly reading the words is to have them read it aloud. The process of reading aloud (and working through corrections) teaches students automaticity.

    Regarding comprehension, I really dislike the way some districts focus so much on fluency (read-aloud speed), to the exclusion of comprehension. (Can you say DIBELS? - but supposedly, DIBELS is changing.) I do not focus exclusively on reading mechanics, but have to make that a large part of our reading day, simply because my students are so young. I use lots of higher-order questions and modeling to reinforce comprehension. My goal (and I am fairly successful thus far) is that my students learn the mechanics of reading with automaticity, while understanding the meaning of what they read. The skills are separate, yet related.

    I hope I'm making sense... I feel as if I am rambling.
     
  9. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Jul 31, 2011

    :thumb:
     
  10. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jul 31, 2011

    I agree with what quite a few posters have already said. As kids get older, it becomes more scripted, and kids have less choice of what they can read. Maybe we can't get kids to love reading, but I don't see why our goal can't be to get them to enjoy it at the very least.
     

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