When do I enforce

Discussion in 'Behavior Management Archives' started by facsteach, Jul 18, 2006.

  1. facsteach

    facsteach Rookie

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    Jul 18, 2006

    I struggle with consequences. Say for example my rule is be respectful and a student talks while I am talking I usually give them the first consequence - a warning, then the next is a safe seat and so on. Here comes my question... if they come in the next day and do the same thing do I give them a warning again or do I start from where I left off. Sometimes I feel like I give them too many warnings because they are doing the same thing just on different days. I feel like I go round and round any ideas?
     
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  3. ViolaSwamp

    ViolaSwamp Habitué

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    Jul 18, 2006

    First make sure you help the child out by moving them to the front of the classroom (or closer to you) or at least away from friends and find out their motivation for talking. This is part of setting them up for success. Some kids just can't sit near certain kids. I like to start each day fresh but if this becomes a constant problem (and the other things haven't worked) you need to let the child know that they will lose the 'warning privilege' if it continues. "Starting tomorrow you will not get warnings." It's really a last resort because I know I'm not perfect and have been known to whisper to someone near me--but I can still stay mostly on track--and I've always been a pretty good kid:p !
     
  4. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    What grade are you teaching? I think it makes a huge diffence.
     
  5. facsteach

    facsteach Rookie

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    I teach 7th and 8th graders
     
  6. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Seventh grade is old enough to remember rules from Monday to Tuesday. You set the rules day 1. The first time there's a problem, it's addressed. THe second time, there's a consequence. And each child doesn't get a chance-- it's one "John, I'm speaking" before you up the ante a bit.
     
  7. facsteach

    facsteach Rookie

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    Alice are you saying just issue a classwide warning? See this is where my stress is. I will have Johnny talking give him a warning, then another does it and so on, but they haven't gone past their first warning. Or they also come in and do the same thing tomorrow. I feel like I spend all my time giving warnings
     
  8. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Do you ever just stop talking and stand there waiting for them to realize it? Sometimes I say, "I'll wait until you're ready"...
     
  9. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I do that a lot too.

    I do not believe that each student needs a personalized invitation to follow the rules.(Besides, how on earth do you keep track?) I think you can walk in and say that, as of today, the warnings are over and the consequences will begin. Then do it. THat first day you'll have a lot of kids after school, or whatever, until they realize you now mean business.

    edited to add: Sometimes, I just threaten to erase the word "odds" from the homework. The class quiets down in a hurry!!!
     
  10. JustWondering

    JustWondering Companion

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    This reminds me of the research I did on how to get babies and toddlers to sleep at night. Also on "the willful child" I have a four year old that is a boundary pusher. If it's not one rule today it's another rule tomorrow. According to what I read in that area for my parent rearing that this continues all through life. The continually will check and make sure the boundaries are still there. The 1-2-3 magic book addressed the issue of children who will stop at 2, never make it to three but every day make it to 2. They suggested taking away a "count" or making the "count" run all week as opposed to one day. Maybe some of those "child rearing" techniques can give you some ideas to modify them into the classroom?
     
  11. facsteach

    facsteach Rookie

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    Jul 19, 2006

    I have tried waiting or stopping, but it also seems like that takes a lot of time out of class. Sometimes I just feel my class is out of control. I guess maybe I am too picky, when I say no talking I expect them to stop, that includes whispering. However I always seem to be disappointed because I feel like I go in circles. My administrators think I do a good job and feel I have good control and have never said anything when students are talking while I am talking. I of course address it, but I have to address it several times
     
  12. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    I couldn't deal with it if they talked while I was talking. Nope. One day when we had a few visiting students, two of my boys kept at it and kept at it. Nothing terrible, kinda funny, but too distracting. After class I walked with them to lunch. When we stopped I asked both of them to see me. I said, very bluntly, "Okay, I'm not going to be too PC here. Pull that crap again and you are out of my class." They looked completely shocked since that isn't my style. It worked.
     
  13. agsrule!

    agsrule! Companion

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    Jul 23, 2006

    When to enforce

    Each day is a new day. You wouldn't want the student that was sent to the office to walk into class the next day with an attitude, so you would shake hands, welcome them back to class, and leave it at that. You don't want to dwell on the bad. But, it does sound like they are getting too many warnings. I have one verbal warning. Then a 2nd wrning with name written in my planner. When I have to add a check, that's a 20 minute detention, after that it's aphone call home. If necessary, we skip the detention and call home right in the middle of class. I take the student in the hall, call the parent on my cell phone, and have the student disrupt their parents day since they are disrupting mine. I only had to do that about 5 times all year long. Everyone got the hint.
     
  14. holliday

    holliday Comrade

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    I usually give one verbal warning, then if the misbehavior continues, I write the student's name in the "Limbo" box. If the kid keeps it together for the rest of the period, the name gets erased. If misbehavior continues, they are officially in trouble! That means they get a note sent home (I use carbon copy pads so I can keep a copy without running to the copy machine) AND they have to serve lunch detention in my room. Lunch detention usually entails cleaning my room for me. I only hold lunch detentions once a week so that there is plenty of time for parents to know about it (and adjust whether they bring a bag lunch or whatever).
    I find that this works really well as long as I'm totally consistent with it. Now, I find that I nip the problem in the bud before I get worked up over it (it's too late when you're already so angry that you're about to flip...stop it WAY before that point!). I just dispassionately say, "Welcome to limbo, Bobby." And they know that the next step is lunch detention.
     
  15. jerry829

    jerry829 New Member

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    Aug 2, 2006

    Hi, I am a new student-teacher right now. I have just done my 1st prac-teaching last month. The same situation happened to my year 9 class. They kept talking to each other again and again. I do not have a good way to solve this yet, however, I really think I should not send any of my student out of my class(as what I was told by my co-op teacher). In my opinion, pay a little attention is much better than pay no attention. Even they are keep talking for 2, 3 times, there is still chance for them to settle and learn.
     
  16. Jenni

    Jenni Rookie

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    Aug 2, 2006

    One thing I might suggest with older students is drop a pop quiz in their lap. Have everyone get out a piece of paper and explain since they are talking you assume they already know the information. Then, proceed to ask them a few questions on whatever you were trying to talk about. Either that or, you could completely shut down class. Let them talk and say that the next day they will have an exam over whatever you were going to instruct on. You can offer that you will be going over it with those that choose to listen but the rest a free to talk. Most high school students will shape up when their grade is on the line.

    I have also had my highschool teachers take minutes into passing period. What do you care if they are late to class because they couldn't behave? They'll suffer the consequences. In my highschools case that was a 50 minute afterschool detention.

    Of course these suggestions are for when the whole class is mostly out of line. If it's only one student repeatedly maybe you need to rethink your consequences, maybe they aren't something the student minds. They talk about "time-outs" in elementary school and the fact that some kids like them because they don't have to do anything.
     
  17. researcherguy

    researcherguy Rookie

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    Aug 2, 2006

    It will be difficult for you to get tougher (so don't be discouraged if you change your procedures and it gets harder for a few weeks) but 7th graders need a short leash.

    The suggestions above are excellent . . . it SOUNDS like (speaking as an arm-chair quarterback) that if you are still having this problem, you would need to find consequences that are more meaningful to your students. I found that with middle school, the note or call home was the bad behavior killer. I call home once (Mrs. so-and-so, I'm a little concerned that Bobby is starting to talk more in class than usual and is making it difficult for others to concentrate. I'm letting you know so that you are in the loop. I'm going to get tougher here on him . . . yadda yadda) and the behavior 90% of the time diminishes.

    Also - when you get a chance to start anew (next class) - start tough and lighten up. I had a close colleague that spent the first 2 weeks of school focusing on classroom procedures (7th grade science). He had not one iota of problems the rest of the year (and the kids had fun because they knew what to expect). To the extreme - I have heard a high school teacher say that he finds the toughest kid in school on the first day, reads the kid the riot act in front of his peers to the point of tears, and never sees another issue. Thats extreme and inappropriate, but the lesson is there - be tough early and lighten up later (if you choose). Makes all the difference.
     

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