When a teacher provides incorrect information. Wwyd?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by terptoteacher, Sep 16, 2013.

  1. terptoteacher

    terptoteacher Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2006
    Messages:
    1,751
    Likes Received:
    2

    Sep 16, 2013

    Dd is taking a sports medicine elective. Right now theyre focusing on basic anatomy and first aid. She discusses what she's learned with her dad. He's been a firefighter EMT for 26 years. Some of the things on her last test were incorrect. We went over the test and at first I thought the teacher just didn't correct it carefully enough and gave her full credit for incorrect answers.but then dd says that it was an open note test and she copied the notes directly from his notes on the screen.
    Do you think we should let him know his information is incorrect? For example he told them that bones can be dislocated. Bones can't be dislocated, joints can. He said that a hematoma was a bruise but hematoma means swelling and echimosis is a bruise. There was something else but I don't remember off hand.
    What do you think, should I tell him?
     
  2.  
  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,606
    Likes Received:
    2,712

    Sep 16, 2013

    A hematoma is a bruise. An ecchymosis is a big hematoma.

    Anything with "hema" in it usually pertains to blood, not swelling. It comes from Greek.
     
  4. terptoteacher

    terptoteacher Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2006
    Messages:
    1,751
    Likes Received:
    2

    Sep 16, 2013

    By definition, a hematoma is a collection of blood outside of a blood vessel. It occurs because the wall of a blood vessel wall, artery, vein or capillary, has been damaged and blood has leaked into tissues where it does not belong. The hematoma may be tiny, with just a dot of blood or it can be large and cause significant swelling

    The medical term ecchymosis is what most people would recognize as a bruise, or blood that has leaked out of a broken blood vessel under the skin that is caused by an injury. Another word for this injury is a contusion. An ecchymosis tends to be flat while a hematoma has more of a three dimensional character to it. As well, hematomas may occur in any organ and not just under the skin.

    In the field of emergency medicine the term hematoma is used when there is swelling involved.
     
  5. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,606
    Likes Received:
    2,712

    Sep 16, 2013

    It's still a bruise. I guess I don't think that the teacher's information is wrong in this situation. If you want to bring it to his attention, feel free. I don't think it's worth the battle, though.
     
  6. terptoteacher

    terptoteacher Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2006
    Messages:
    1,751
    Likes Received:
    2

    Sep 16, 2013

    Oh I definitely wouldn't approach it as a battle. If I did approach him it would be as one professional to another.:)
     
  7. ajr

    ajr Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2013
    Messages:
    62
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 17, 2013

    Slavery existed and is was documented in Africa for centuries before settlers showed up. Depending on where you look on the continent, "centuries" becomes "extends into prehistory."

    So it is factual to say - especially at the inception of the transatlantic slave trade - that slaves were purchased in Africa, because that's exactly what happened. They didn't show up and say "Oi, you, on the boat." The European traders were sold enslaved Africans, who were owned by other Africans (along with the goods they actually showed up for).

    As the trade developed into a highly lucrative economy, so did raiding by Europeans for slaves; that is accurate as well. However, prior to, during, and after the the transatlantic slave trade, slaves were traded in Africa.

    It didn't end with the transatlantic trade; the abolition of slavery across the African continent was mixed, and had a strong lag behind even America's abolition of slavery - right up to the 1900s.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_in_Africa#Atlantic_slave_trade
     
  8. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2007
    Messages:
    17,362
    Likes Received:
    46

    Sep 17, 2013

    I don't think I would approach the teacher on this one.
     
  9. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    5,770
    Likes Received:
    1,003

    Sep 17, 2013

    I don't know. As a teacher, I would appreciate being told if I was teaching something incorrectly to students in a polite manner. Granted, within reason of course and from someone who has an appropriate background.
     
  10. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2005
    Messages:
    4,395
    Likes Received:
    7

    Sep 17, 2013

    I think I would approach it as a parent coming to you to inform you about misinformation. How would you want to be approached? Would you be offended? We all know there's nothing really to be offended over, but teachers can be possessive about information.

    Ultimately, I guess you have to think about whether it really matters. Can you or your husband check in with your son, and talk with him about how people will commonly refer to a hematoma as a bruise, but in the medical field it's used to refer to something else? Or encourage your son to ask the instructor?

    I just get a funny feeling about what could be seen as "nit-picking". Not that I'm saying you would do that, but it could come across as that. Now, if you were noticing several things, a pattern emerging, then you might approach the teacher and inquire about the curriculum. But one or two things, I would probably correct it at home and move on.

    Hope that helps!
     
  11. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2005
    Messages:
    4,395
    Likes Received:
    7

    Sep 17, 2013

    Er...daughter! Your daughter! My mistake!
     
  12. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2012
    Messages:
    1,841
    Likes Received:
    51

    Sep 17, 2013

    Well I guess it depends. Like a lot of stuff in science is simplified at younger ages. So although a hematoma is technically something other than a bruise, for all intensive purposes, it's a kind of bruise.

    This is something I always get caught up in while teaching younger science. They'll say something like "all plants have flowers, roots, leaves and a stem" Which is not true at all! BUT, for 3rd graders it's what they need to know for right now. It's hard for me to not go more in depth and tell them that not actually all plants have flowers, etc etc. I bet that the teacher knows that the answers are "wrong" but for right now, it's what the kids need to know. As they advance, they'll learn more information.
     
  13. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,397
    Likes Received:
    4

    Sep 17, 2013

    When I simplify something for my kiddos, though, I'll try to tell them that: "You'll learn about some exceptions to this when you get older, but for now you need to know that plants have..."
     
  14. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2012
    Messages:
    1,841
    Likes Received:
    51

    Sep 17, 2013

    Right, but in their notebooks they would just have what they need to know now. So that's what the test would be based off of.

    The two examples given (hematoma=bruise and bones can be dislocated) are both only sort-of wrong. For the age level, that's what the teacher was supposed to teach. I mean especially for sports med, you can't possibly teach kids what professionals know. You give them a lower level and when they advance they get the in-depth information.
     
  15. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2006
    Messages:
    7,946
    Likes Received:
    3

    Sep 17, 2013

    This.
     
  16. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,958
    Likes Received:
    2,112

    Sep 17, 2013

    Instead you could say : Many plants have flowers... Third graders are pretty savvy. They can handle the truth.:)
     
  17. dave1mo

    dave1mo Comrade

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2013
    Messages:
    417
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 17, 2013

    On the topic of correcting teachers...it's "all intents and purposes." :)
     
  18. terptoteacher

    terptoteacher Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2006
    Messages:
    1,751
    Likes Received:
    2

    Sep 17, 2013

    Yeah I doubt I will say anything to the teacher unless we notice a pattern of misinformation. It didn't bother me as much as it did my husband. This is an elective, but it dd is a junior in high school so I would expect the curriculum to be more in depth than just a surface level.
     
  19. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    3,262
    Likes Received:
    748

    Sep 17, 2013

    Agree. :thumb::thumb:
     
  20. dave1mo

    dave1mo Comrade

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2013
    Messages:
    417
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 18, 2013

    And this type of defensiveness is exactly why we're having this "wwyd" conversation; some teachers will respond defensively no matter what.
     
  21. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Messages:
    4,330
    Likes Received:
    572

    Sep 18, 2013

    I've worked in medical offices off and on. Hematoma was used as bruises then. I think your husband is jumping the gun here, assuming that his knowledge from his job trumps that of the teacher. Which is common - the whole if you can do, if you can't, teach.
     
  22. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    3,262
    Likes Received:
    748

    Sep 18, 2013

    Do you really believe that? I think many teachers are very knowledgeable.
     
  23. terptoteacher

    terptoteacher Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2006
    Messages:
    1,751
    Likes Received:
    2

    Sep 18, 2013

     
  24. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,606
    Likes Received:
    2,712

    Sep 18, 2013

    I understand that it's not your husband's experience, but really and truly: a bruise is a hematoma and a hematoma is a bruise. This is true in all fields, even in the medical field. And honestly, who else would use the word "hematoma" besides the medical field? In any event, I don't think it's good idea to dig your heels in on this one. There is so much credible information out there that says that they are the same thing that you can't really fault a teacher for repeating that, can you?

    Source: National Institutes of Health

    http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/007213.htm
     
  25. terptoteacher

    terptoteacher Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2006
    Messages:
    1,751
    Likes Received:
    2

    Sep 18, 2013

    Like I said, I don't intend to approach the teacher on this because the misinformation is pretty insignificant.[/QUOTE]
     
  26. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,170

    Sep 19, 2013

    Human beings, alas, can be remarkably horrible to each other. The unsettling truth in ajr's post is that, when it comes to the slave trade, few hands are entirely clean (one thinks of the many participants in the New England economy, including but not limited to shipowners and captains, who plumed themselves for never owning slaves but who profited mightily from the trade). The cogent point of HeartDrama's original post and riposte is a truth that is or should be self-evident: that those shipped in that vicious trade, whatever their state of servitude - or date, for that matter - were indeed human beings and deserve to be dignified as such by us.

    As to the allegation of defensiveness, some of the back-and-forth on the topic of "bruise" vs. "hematoma" comes rather closer - which is to say that the original allegation can be sustained only on the assumption that "defensive" is a synonym for "taking a stand I don't like". It's worth adding that, while disagreement with derision may impart an adrenaline rush to the derider, disagreeing civilly and respectfully both requires and evinces greater skill and more heart.
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2013
  27. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Messages:
    4,330
    Likes Received:
    572

    Sep 19, 2013



    Oh, no, no, no, I do not believe that. I was referring to the sad commentary that teachers get sometimes. That if someone in the field uses a term ONE way, then it must invalidate a simple ole teacher's use of a different way.
     
  28. HistoryVA

    HistoryVA Devotee

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2013
    Messages:
    1,016
    Likes Received:
    38

    Sep 19, 2013

    Then it sounds like you had an issue with the teacher's connotation or sensitivity towards the subject, not her facts. Ajr was just presenting you with the facts that the teacher's use of "African slaves" was not grammatically or factually incorrect.
     
  29. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,170

    Sep 19, 2013

    To return to the original point of the thread: When I was in second grade, one day I marched up to the teacher at the blackboard, tugged on her skirt (for I was a very small second-grader, pointed to a word she had written, and announced, "You spelled that wrong." She had the grace to admit her error, though later she shared the story with my parents - and I heard about it periodically for the rest of my father's long life. Behold the sad fate of the know-it-more.

    In the intervening decades I've become subtler, mostly. Public forums such as A to Z complicate matters, as does being a moderator: a public statement can serve more agendas than one. Generally, however, it works well to correct in private. Were I in HeartDrama's position, I'd approach the teacher one on one to request the rephrasing - as I'm sure HeartDrama did; were I in fact HeartDrama, the point would probably have required no further elaboration. (Think about why that might be.) If the teacher persisted in standing his or her ground, I might then gently note that referring to those traded as "African slaves" is grammatically and factually correct to the extent that it is grammatically and factually correct to refer to a fourteen-year-old girl who has been forced into the sex trade as a "teenage hooker": most of us quite properly resort to a more cumbersome circumlocution in recognition that the deeper facts of the case trump the surface grammar.
     
  30. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Messages:
    4,330
    Likes Received:
    572

    Sep 19, 2013

    how, exactly, is a rape victim (as one forced into sex slavery would be) considered a hooker? Even on a technicality, I don't see it.
     
  31. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,606
    Likes Received:
    2,712

    Sep 19, 2013

    Have you not read news stories where a 14-year-old prostitute gets arrested? I would argue that most of those young girls aren't prostitutes by choice but by coercion. Still, they're treated like criminals, arrested, the whole nine.
     
  32. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,170

    Sep 19, 2013

    Ask the one who pays her pimp. Which is and continues to be part of the point, and the truth of my earlier observation that human beings can be remarkably horrible to each other.
     
  33. Shanoo

    Shanoo Habitué

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2007
    Messages:
    761
    Likes Received:
    5

    Sep 19, 2013

    So, a bit of a t/j, but what would you do if the teacher in question was a colleague?

    A few years back, a couple of my students were chatting as they did their seatwork about gay marriage. I overheard one of them refer to gay marriage as "illegal". I quickly corrected the student, telling her that it was, in fact, very legal and had been for a long time. She then tried to correct me by saying that "No, it's not legal, it's just not looked down upon anymore". I asked her where she heard that and she told me the social studies teacher told them that. I just replied with "Huh. Well, I'm certain it's legal" and left it at that.
     
  34. HistoryVA

    HistoryVA Devotee

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2013
    Messages:
    1,016
    Likes Received:
    38

    Sep 19, 2013

    I once had a student swear up and down that another history teacher told her that Pocahontas and John Smith WERE in love and even secretly married. :rolleyes:

    I take all student claims that "______ said it!" with a massive grain of salt.
     
  35. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    6,196
    Likes Received:
    2,125

    Sep 19, 2013

    I've heard that rumor, too! It wasn't from a student.
     
  36. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2007
    Messages:
    17,362
    Likes Received:
    46

    Sep 19, 2013

    You mean they weren't? :confused::p
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Ima Teacher
Total: 450 (members: 2, guests: 426, robots: 22)
test