When 3rd level children are not being role models

Discussion in 'Montessori' started by tracykaliski, Sep 29, 2008.

  1. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

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    Sep 29, 2008

    I teach in a 3-6 classroom and we have 24 children total. Of those, 8 are kindergartners. Out of the entire class, we have 13 new children, which is frightening. More than half the class is new this year.

    And, to complicate matters, the 3rd level children are not acting as role models. They continue to chat with each other at meeting, use works in inappropriate ways (and we're not specific about how they use them. We give children many opportunities for experimentation, and this is the first time I've had a group of 3rd level children who are doing this.)

    I'm at my wits end with these children. We've had meetings, we've done role plays and modeling with them. Is there anything else I should be doing that we've missed?

    Thanks in advance.
     
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  3. Yenna

    Yenna Companion

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    Oct 2, 2008

    Tracy - I think whenever children are not engaged we need to look at what their interests are and also if they are being challenged enough. Are they making flags, small booklets, doing function of words and math charts?
    It simply is just hard with so many new children as well. There is definitely an adjustment period. I have one child currently who is 3rd year and not always an appropriate role model - I had a one on one talk with him about it and developed a strategy of non-verbal signals that I can give him when I notice that he is getting "wound up". When he sees me give the signal he is to remove himself from the situation. I do Grace and Courtesy and the "Directions Game" to reinforce the signals (one for "come here" one for "quiet down") with children who need it.
    If they are talking during the "meeting", (I'm assuming this is whole group) can they go somewhere else for a quiet conversation? How long is the meeting?
     
  4. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

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    Oct 4, 2008

    OU rmeetings are only 10-15 minutes long at the most. That includes transition time.

    My frustration was more of an overall lack of accepting responsibility for themselves. Fortunately, everyone's engaged in good work, but our one new kindergarten child has never really been engaged with work before and she's finding the transition difficult.

    I think you're right about the adjustment period. It's gotten better since I originally posted this, and I'm sure it will continue to improve. I think my impatience is what I need to try to control, not the children!
     

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