What's Your Opinion?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by teachinIA4137, May 8, 2015.

  1. teachinIA4137

    teachinIA4137 Rookie

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    May 8, 2015

    So in my district I am considered an "outside" employee, aka someone who basically works everyday at the school but is not paid by the district. Which is fine, because I love what I do.

    This year, they have had several openings but said they couldn't allow me to interview because I was not internal. The principal said I should wait until it goes public. So okay.

    I find out today that the last position (4th grade) was filled internally by a special education teacher, whom just began working there this past fall (I have had ties with this district since I began college), and they will have to find a SpEd teacher for that building.

    What frustrates me is that SpeEd is her ONLY endorsement, so why immediately transfer from your SpEd position into the GenEd classroom? To me if your endorsement is SpEd, then you should actually want to teach it! I was told that I should not pursue SpEd just to make myself more marketable, as that dilutes the Sped teachers who TRULY care. Which I agree with.

    So what do you think? Is it wrong to use your SpEd endorsement as a resume builder? I mean, I get transferring when necessary, but this seems like it was a blatant excuse for her to get her foot in the door. Ugh.
     
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  3. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    May 8, 2015

    Honestly, there are pros and cons to having multiple endorsements, and sometimes it backfires on individuals who are tagged to teach an endorsement they actually hate, but have to look good on a resume. It is possible that the SPED was gained as graduate credit, which brings more to the table, so it wasn't fluff. Also, the class she was given may have a high level of inclusion that is better suited to a SPED teacher in a general ed position. Those are some of the things you would never know unless you happened to be a fly on the wall during the hiring process.
     
  4. heatherberm

    heatherberm Cohort

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    May 8, 2015

    I agree that, in theory, special ed teachers should be in special ed because they really want to be. But special ed is hard and student teaching or subbing doesn't give you a real feel for what it's like to do it every day nor does it give you a real feel for all the extra stuff - meetings, paperwork etc. - that's special to special ed. It's always possible that she just decided that special ed, or special ed in that particular setting, wasn't for her. It happens.
     
  5. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    May 8, 2015

    It's possible that she really did (or still does) want to teach sped. Maybe it just wasn't a good fit for her at this school. Maybe she is really happy to teach either one, and she was asked to consider moving to a gen ed position. You never know...

    I'm certified in both and have equal experience in both. I enjoy teaching both equally. At my school, the administrative side of sped was wearing me down. I needed a change, so I made one. I moved back to gen ed and loved it. I still love sped, too, and I'm going back to sped again next year. Changing from one to another doesn't mean that a person doesn't care about what they are teaching. I'd be highly offended if anyone thought that I made the change because my sped certification was just a resume builder and that I didn't really care about teaching it. That's so far from the truth!

    Anyway, my point is: Try not to judge a person without really knowing them and their motivations.

    Also, it doesn't sound like you have had an automatic "in" anyway. Sure, you know them and go way back, but you're considered an "external" employee. It can be very difficult for employees who work at a school and are even paid by that school to get a job there. At my school, it's the paras who can't get hired. When it comes to teaching jobs, they're considered external employees, even though they might have worked as a para at the school the entire time they were earning their degree. It just is what it is.
     
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    May 8, 2015

    Use that s districts experience as just that. Experience. Bombed on. Market yourself.
     

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