WHAT'S UP W/ THESE "REGULAR" ED TEACHERS??

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by tx ppcd, Sep 21, 2007.

  1. tx ppcd

    tx ppcd Rookie

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    Sep 21, 2007

    I have a student who is five. I teach life skills. We decided to send her out for 30 minutes into the general education classroom during centers. She was doing fine and one day she cried and the teacher sent her back to my class. Well the next week the teacher decides maybe she needs to go to another teacher for more "hands on" activities. She cries in that teacher's class and gets sent back to me. I talked the teacher and her attititude is like "she's not my student". She tells me "what can I do if she's crying?" Any suggestions? She hasn't been ARDed for this so I just want to keep her because it really seems like they do not want to take time to establish rapport with her and make her feel welcome.
     
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  3. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Sep 21, 2007

    That's a tough situation. I would think about setting up an ARD to put inclusion in her IEP. I think that the general ed teachers' mind set is that its not required that she be in my class so when she starts causing a problem by crying, I'm going to send her out so I won't have to deal with. It might be that these teachers have some behavior issues in their classroom and don't want the extra 'burden' of having her in there crying adding to their hectic day.
     
  4. bcblue

    bcblue Comrade

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    Sep 21, 2007

    Are you mainstreaming her by herself, or with a para? If you are able to send her with a para, that always helps. The other thing is just for you to sit down with the gen ed teacher and talk about exactly what the student's needs and disabilities. People tend to be frightened, nervous, or annoyed by what they don't understand. Gen ed teachers I've worked with in similar situations often seem to feel better and more welcoming when they understand what the situation is, what to expect from the student, etc. Hopefully you can work out the situation--sometimes general ed can be unkind to "our" students, and that's always hard!!!
     
  5. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Sep 21, 2007

    Not that it should matter, but when is the center time for the room. I know that mine are at the end of the day and I can see some teachers being exhausted and not up to dealing with it at that moment. For me this is the time that I write notes home, fill in behavior forms, and do assessments with the children one-on-one. I would find out if there is some other time that might work better. I have a student who comes in for calendar and some LA activities in the morning. Calendar is whole group, so it was easy to introduce him and have him participate with everyone else. An aide comes with him and helps him to complete the same work the other students do. I can also talk to him myself and build my own relationship with him.
    I also think that sometimes general ed teachers just don't know what to do and need support from you. I agree with the previous poster about letting the teacher know your expectations and what you do when she cries. Also, why not build up to the everyday so that it is easier on all?
     
  6. fratbrats

    fratbrats Comrade

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    Sep 21, 2007

    You will find that some gen. ed. teachers will welcome your students with open arms and others who are resistant. Try to find that special teacher for your student. Maybe this teacher isn't the one. You want to be as supportive to those gen. ed. teachers as possible. If they are nervous about this, but see that you will support them, they will be much more willing to work with your student. Of course, once they realize how wonderful that child is, they are hooked!

    It's great to see how the students in those classes love these special kids!

    Maybe if an aide can go, the aide can see what is upsetting her. And if she's crying, can't be comforted, and preventing the other students from learning, then perhaps she should come back. You want it to be a great experience for her. And the

    I would request an ARD, so you can legally get her gen. ed. time.

    Take care,

    Sheri:)
     
  7. bcblue

    bcblue Comrade

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    Sep 22, 2007

    aside--curiosity question--ARD? I don't think we had those initials in MA. :)
     
  8. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Sep 22, 2007

    I personally (as an aide) have witnessed teachers not doing their part when a child needs modification in their classroom. Sometimes they need the extra support of knowing how. Other times they just don't want to deal with it. Let's take one teacher I know who during an assessment test witnesses two boys getting a little rowdy but not behaving horribly. They simply needed a teacher to walk over and say something to them but insted the teacher shouts, "Do you want me to send you to the behavior consultant?!!" Umm.....you haven't even walked over yet and tried to solve the problem yourself before pawning it off on others. But this is like those special teachers who over depend on gen ed teachers and any other teacher who decides they are clueless and it's not their problem. It's only a few handful and it certainly doesn't reflect everyone. They need you to tell them what they can do next time. They need you to make it easy to gain your support but harder to dump on you without trying to work it out. Then at the same time we have to understand that teachers are teaching 30 kids while trying to rush through curriculum as well.
     
  9. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    Sep 22, 2007

    Hmmmmmmmm kind of an offensive title. I think it should be what's up with this regular ed teacher! I wanted to know why the special ed teacher was pulling out my student that is labeled as a special ed teacher.
     
  10. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Sep 22, 2007

    ARD stands for Admission, Review, and Dismissal meeting(Texas).

    It basically means "IEP meeting."


    You "have an ARD" to make any changes to the IEP, go over assessments, etc.
     
  11. SpecSub

    SpecSub Comrade

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    Sep 22, 2007

    I honestly don't know.

    My situation's a bit different from yours in that I also service a 5 year old, but he's in a general ed kindergarten class. He has a one-on-one assigned to him. He has MR and some behavior issues. I pull him out for reading and math and IEP skills.

    His gen ed teacher calls his father to come and pick him up when he misbehaves. She's also sent him with a para to the pull-out room before he's supposed to go, to get rid of him. I had to put a stop to that because his IEP is specific about how many hours he's to be pulled out of general ed.

    She doesn't consider him one of "her" students and just thinks he disrupts her class and his classmates. Well, it's his class, too, and he has equal rights to an education - his classmates don't take precedence over him.

    I'm working with the teacher, the one-on-one and the student to get all this under control.

    My suggestion to you, since your general ed teacher isn't actually responsible for inclusion for your student, to find someone who's more on the same page as you are.
     
  12. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Sep 22, 2007

    Speaking as a general ed teacher, whose school practices inclusion I have a couple of thoughts.

    1. Get it written into the IEP, that way no one can say she can't be there. (I tell people all the time, that I may do a certain accommodation, but put it in the IEP so that the next teacher will do it.)

    2. Help the general ed teacher meet the child's needs. (I had a child last year that needed large print. It required that I put all work sheets/workbook pages in large print. I would blow everything up & put on legal size paper. I would have loved to have someone make those extra copies for me!)

    3. Many children come to us needing something "extra", whether it's love, patience, understanding, a lower academic level, a higher academic level, whatever. As a general ed teacher, sometimes I just need to hear that whatever I'm doing for that "challenging" child is the right thing. I need to hear it from the resource room teacher, the social worker, the parent, the principal. Give the general ed teacher a pat on the back.

    4. Talk to the general ed teacher. Don't just give us a sheet of paper saying this is the child's goals & accommodations. Tell us about the child. I know that if I get that list of goals at the beginning of the year, I'm overwhelmed with paperwork & may just glance at it & not remember it.

    5. Remember (& remind) that you are on the same team for this child. Growth is the goal.

    Ok, so I didn't address the whole question, but maybe this will help you to work with the general ed teacher who will be working with your child. Get the general ed teacher on the same page as you are with this child.
     
  13. AZSpedtchr

    AZSpedtchr Rookie

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    Sep 25, 2007

    I have been frustrated by the response of gen ed teachers sometimes as well. One in particular this year seems to have decided to "write off" one of the kids we share. Since he's in 3rd grade and is reading & writing at an early 1st grade level, she does not include him in many activities. It is frustrating for the child and for me! I have offered multiple types of supports for her, and I pull this child out for resource 1 1/2 hours a day. She still doesn't get that he is HER student too!
    I must say, though, that this is one out of more than a dozen teachers that I work with. The rest are more accepting of the special needs kids.
     
  14. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Sep 26, 2007

    I can see someone not modifying enough or giving too easy of work but I can't see someone not including the kids in activities, etc. That's just cruel.
     
  15. history_girl_au

    history_girl_au Rookie

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    Sep 26, 2007


    As a fellow aide I can relate to this situation!
     
  16. fratbrats

    fratbrats Comrade

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    Sep 26, 2007

    Nicely written! Great work on your part! Your students are lucky to have you! :p
     
  17. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Sep 26, 2007

    I try!
     

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