what's the problem?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by mstemple05, Aug 24, 2007.

  1. mstemple05

    mstemple05 Cohort

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2007
    Messages:
    675
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 24, 2007

    i've been reading different posts in different forums and i'm seeing a trend here. a lot of certified teachers are still out of work! i thought there was a need for teachers. what is going on? especially in the northeast i'm seeing.
     
  2.  
  3. 100%Canadian

    100%Canadian Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    246
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 24, 2007

    I'd say it's all about demographics. That baby boomer generation retired over the last ten years which is slowly closing the door for new teachers. New ones in means few opportunities for newly qualified teachers. Families tend to be a little smaller than they used to and schools tend to be more transient than in the past. Perhaps the need you speak of happens to be somewhere else. Hiring up here has dropped over the last few years and our school board has lost approximately 5,000 students over the last five years. Sign of the times, I guess.
     
  4. gillianvt

    gillianvt Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2007
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 24, 2007

    I know it's crazy. You go to school to get a masters and then getting a job is so hard. Well at least for me, I"m not willing to take any old job. I got offered a job at a daycare paying $11/hr no benefits. Where I am that is nothing, and to think I have a masters. Those are the jobs that are available around me. Not the ones in public schools for gen. ed elementary. I guess I should have specialized. Or, I shouldn't have given up the job I had 1hr and 10 min. away. And I thought that it was bad paying, well I guess I'm wrong.
     
  5. mstemple05

    mstemple05 Cohort

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2007
    Messages:
    675
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 24, 2007

    so you didn't take the daycare one. did you wait for the job you have now or are you still looking? would you have taken it if they offered benefits? what if it was $13.50 w/ benefits? this is so hard. $11/no benefits isn't much in philly either. especially w/ all the work and time you put in. i mean, at times it seems like what was the point of even going to college when there are so many people who are making so much more than you with just a hs diploma, maybe an associate's. uuuuurrrggghhhh.
     
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,950
    Likes Received:
    2,102

    Aug 24, 2007


    My district interviewed about 40 people to fill 4 openings. (and those 40 interviews were chosen from a pile of hundreds of resumes!!) Just because someone is a CERTIFIED teacher doesn't mean they are what a district wants. Cover letters and resumes with misspellings? Don't want those 'certified teachers'... Dressed inappropriately for interview? "certified teachers" show up like this and forget that you never have a second chance to make a first impression!! Not well spoken, poised or passionate? don't want those 'certified teachers' either as you are going to be speaking to children, parents and colleagues as a teacher- you might as well be good at it!! All that said, even if you jump though all those hoops successfully, you need to be a 'just right' fit for a district --
     
  7. AnthonyA

    AnthonyA Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2007
    Messages:
    98
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 24, 2007

    I think it depends on alot of things. Location, luck, etc...

    I am not certified yet but I did have two positions at one point.
    I had one in a private school and one in a public school.

    The one I had in the private school didn't last because the teacher who had vacated her position decided to come back. That left me out although I did gain some nice experience.

    The second one I had, which was in a public school, was as an AIS Teacher. I worked with small groups preparing them for their skills assesment tests.
    That didn't last either. They did away with that particular program. The principal did have a 3rd grade position available but couldn't give it to me because of my lack of certification.

    I think if they like you and have something you will get it. I got both of mine from subbing and they liked me. That and a little luck can do it if you're in the right place at the right time I guess.
     
  8. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Aug 24, 2007

    It varies widely from one part of the country to the next.

    From my home, I could drive to probably 8 or 10 colleges in under half an hour. That's an awful LOT of graduates in every field. So there is no shortage of any sort in the Long Island area, particularly in teaching.
     
  9. LuvMySunshine

    LuvMySunshine Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2004
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 24, 2007

    The pay certainly desn't hurt either. You can get a job in Oceanside for $55,000 to start or you can work in NYC for like $8,000 less.

    It definitely depends on the location. In my experience, it is not as difficult to get a job in an urban (low income) district as it is in a suburban district.
     
  10. jaruby

    jaruby Companion

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2005
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 24, 2007

    Location, location, location. I live in Michigan and there are no jobs anywhere.

    On the positive side there should be a turn over coming soon. You have to remember a lot of teachers are sticking around a couple extra years to make up the investment losses they got hit with in 2001. And to pay for their kids who seem to be staying at "home" longer and in college longer etc. In my district about 1/3 of the teachers are able to retire with full pensions but they are holding on to make sure they can take care of their families if need be. If the economy turns around there will be a mass retirement.
     
  11. crayonfan

    crayonfan Companion

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2007
    Messages:
    119
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 24, 2007

    There are not a lot of openings in my neck of the woods either. I know several teachers who are only working for insurance.

    Next year we are planning on moving to southern Alabama and they can't seem to find enough teachers. The prospects of finding a teaching job really depends on the demographics.
     
  12. mitten

    mitten Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 24, 2007

    That's reassuring that someone else that lives in Michigan knows there are no jobs to be found. :) I know at least three main jobs I applied for this year there were over 500 applicants for the one position, and it's rare for there to be less than 100. That's competition and I haven't quite figured out how to beat it yet. I have so many friends and classmates that got hired over the phone because they were willing to move out of state. Sometimes I wish I could so I could have a job, but on the other hand I'm going to keep working with kids and wait for that big turnover that's going to happen shortly. That's saying the "big 3" don't go under before then :unsure: .
    Also, what's this about teachers starting at 55,000??? I thought Michigan was one of the top teacher paying states and you won't find a district that will start you over 39,000. Maybe I do need to move. :) Or is that figuring the difference for cost of living?
     
  13. mstemple05

    mstemple05 Cohort

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2007
    Messages:
    675
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 24, 2007

    I def think it's the cost of living. Cuz philadelphia starts around $39,4 w/ a bachelor's and $41,4 for a master's. Cuz I was lookin at $55 myself like I WISH!!
     
  14. jaruby

    jaruby Companion

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2005
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 24, 2007

    We are the 3rd highest paying state behind Cali and Conn. But you need to remember it is an average, so some district in Mich have much lower salaries and some have much higher (same with other states). There are some district that start you over $40k and some are under $30k it all depends on where you are. You also need to remember in Mich we get to top rate much faster than other states which inflates our average because soo many teachers are at the higher end. Most other states have much slower pay schedule so there are a lot more teachers on the lower half still.
     
  15. mitten

    mitten Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 24, 2007

    Ahh yes, the average.
     
  16. LuvMySunshine

    LuvMySunshine Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2004
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 25, 2007

    In Long Island, New York (suburbs of NYC), Nassau specifically, there are a number of districts that start you in the 50's range if you have a master's. The cost of living is ridiculous though, which certainly needs to be taken into account.

    Meanwhile, in the city, you start at 44,000 for a bachelors and around 48 with a master's degree. Even though it's a decent salary, and might even be comparable to some suburban districts close by, certain areas of the city are always looking for teachers. This is due to the neighborhoods they are located in.
     
  17. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2006
    Messages:
    7,075
    Likes Received:
    15

    Aug 25, 2007


    I moved from Michigan to NC because I was applying for jobs with over 1200 applicants.... And that's the stat I know, who knows how high it was in other areas. In NC I was interviewed and offered the position before I got back to my hotel (less than 10 minutes). I am making 32K here, which is a bit less than MI, but they have been giving 5% raises every year for the last several years. Maryland will start teachers off in the mid to upper 40K range. But, it is expensive to live there!
     
  18. mitten

    mitten Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 25, 2007

    I realize there are a lot of variables to look at when it comes to salary and location. (I don't plan on applying in the Detroit Public Schools just to start above 40,000.) I'm happy in Michigan and thank goodness my husband found a teaching job right away, but I still like to complain. :) In the long run I think I'll be happiest here, where the majority of my family lives.
     
  19. PenCelia

    PenCelia Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2005
    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 25, 2007

    I did the move away from home thing for 2 yrs. Got hired over the phone.(started at 42,000) cost of living was high outside of dc. I came back home two years ago and with my med can't find a job. I know of some positions here that stipulate first year teachers only. Ughh! I think it is a money thing. They keep saying wait for 08 because people will want to get out the retirement system is changing. I need benefits before then. I could move again but I know two years down the road I'd be back here.
     
  20. jaruby

    jaruby Companion

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2005
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 25, 2007

    What are you certified in that is huge here? My district laid off 20 rearranged, called back all but 3 then hired 4 because of certifications. Detroit is just as bad or worse to get a job as anywhere else around here. And if you do get hired there expect to be laid off by the next year so I dont recommend it either.

    I know what you mean about staying here. I just cant seem to leave family and friends I love my house and neighborhood etc... My wife works in customs so she could leave if need be but her family is here. I graduated last year and told her we had 2 years of trying to get a job or we were leaving. I was lucky and got hired right out of College so we didnt have ot worry about that but all of my fellow graduates are in the that boat now.
     
  21. mitten

    mitten Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 26, 2007

    I am certified elementary k-8 self-contained and then I have my English and social studies endorsements, so I can teach those two subjects 6-8. I job search in a 40-50 mile radius around where we live now and there really hasn't been anything. If there has it is in a huge district and is one opening where I don't know anyone. I have an interview for a part-time teaching position this week, so we'll see if that works out.
    Unfortunately I don't think I could ever work in the Detroit schools. I can imagine with all the schools closing and the large teacher turnover each year it would be rare to keep your job two years in a row...whether by force or by choice. However, I do come across a lot of postings for the area. But, like I said I don't think I could personally do it and location wise it is out of the question...too far away. I was just making the point that I wouldn't apply there just for a higher salary.
     
  22. KRaeLamb

    KRaeLamb Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2005
    Messages:
    83
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 26, 2007


    I posted earlier about something similar. It seems as though in my county people witout teaching backgrounds and without certifications are getting hired. I too wonder what the deal is.
     
  23. Sagette

    Sagette Companion

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2007
    Messages:
    222
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 26, 2007

    I live in upstate NY and it's the same here. Now, if I wanted to move down to the city or North Carolina, I am pretty sure my certification, experience, and passion for education would at least get me an interview. Unfortunately, being married with two mortgages and a DH whose job is here makes a move impossible.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Linguist92021,
  2. aHAZEL,
  3. blazer
Total: 405 (members: 4, guests: 385, robots: 16)
test