What's in your bag of sensory motor tricks?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by walkerem, Mar 6, 2011.

  1. walkerem

    walkerem New Member

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    Mar 6, 2011

    I am a Graduate student studying Inclusive Education for students with moderate to severe disabilities.

    For a final project I am creating a blog about inexpensive and easy items to make for/with students and children with sensory motor impairments. I was wondering if any one has done anything in their classrooms that would benefit my project.

    Thanks!::)
     
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  3. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Mar 8, 2011

    Hi walker,

    I didn't want you to think people were ignoring your post :)

    I don't have kids with sensory motor impairment specifically, but I do have kids who have "sensory issues" (not a techincal term)...

    Is there a particular age range you're focusing on? I bet if you posted some of the things you've found so far, you'd get some more feedback.
     
  4. walkerem

    walkerem New Member

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    Mar 10, 2011

    well the age range would be anywhere from pre-k to 6th grade. I want to get as many ideas together as possible to make this blog respectable.

    One idea I have come across is keeping a piece of velcro under a desk so a student can concentrate on the teacher by rubbing the velcro durring the lesson.
    Other things that would help a student like silly putty, or something to help self stimulate the child.
    Anything would help!
     
  5. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Mar 10, 2011

    Bands for the legs of the chair, weighted vests, motor swings, pencils with grips or large pencils, seat cushions....I'm sure I have more, but here's a start.
     
  6. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Mar 10, 2011

    koosh-type balls as "fidgit toys" (but if they throw it, they lose it)
    heavy work can help kids concentrate... wall push-ups, for instance, or pulling/pushing a loaded (based on theri size) wagon or launrdy basket... I've had kids carry jugs of water someplace every day. A weighted backpack helps some kids when they're transitioning...
     
  7. Danny'sNanny

    Danny'sNanny Connoisseur

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    Mar 10, 2011

    balloons full of lentils, rice, or popcorn kernels (I like lentils best though)

    cheap squishy toys and balls from the dollar store

    soft hairties wrapped around the top of a pencil

    clothespins rubberbanded to the top of a pencil

    ball chairs

    seat cushions

    I wear fuzzy slippers during assemblies, so my student can rub the fuzzy part and sit still. But that may be a little too out there... ;)
     
  8. etcetera

    etcetera Rookie

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    Apr 1, 2011

    and
    -color towers (a plastic toy filled with colored bubbles-many students really enjoy these and will either be calmed by them or will work to earn them.
    -tangles
    -weighted lap pads with little pockets they can put their hands into
    -platform swing
     
  9. SwOcean Gal

    SwOcean Gal Devotee

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    Apr 2, 2011

    That is really interesting, I am curious, what do you use those for? Why do you use them?
     
  10. d12brown

    d12brown Rookie

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    Apr 6, 2011

    I have a clear plastic container with a screw on lid. I fill it with different things to match the month's theme. This month it has plastic bugs, fuzzy balls that look like flowers, butterfly beads and bells for sound.

    Koosh balls are nice as well.
     
  11. Zelda~*

    Zelda~* Devotee

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    Apr 6, 2011

    I had a little boy who constantly flipped his eyelids inside out while he sat at his desk. I ended up giving him one of those soft, gel like pencil grips to flip inside out instead.

    Theraputty is awesome.

    Gum to chew, or little twizzler bits.

    Also, just sensory movement breaks. Wall push-ups, etc.
     

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