What would you do?

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by 123456now, Jan 16, 2009.

  1. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jan 27, 2009

    It sounds to me as though it's a done deal. That's why I stopped giving my opinion. I'm not going to be convinced that my own experiences are wrong.
     
  2. Kinder Preppie

    Kinder Preppie Rookie

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    Jan 27, 2009

    Well... we tried... thanks for the support... :)
     
  3. 123456now

    123456now Rookie

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    Jan 27, 2009

    Your own experiences are not wrong. I asked for them to get your perspective. I'm sure your experiences fit a lot of children. Based on the responses I have gotten here though, I have not seen anything to convince me that regular school is right or beneficial for my child.

    Yes, he will have opportunities to have friends in school -- both home school and public/private school.

    Keeping him home will not just have him home with mommy for another year, keeping him a baby. That is a very condescending way to look at a very real form of education. A kindergartner is a big boy. That is why I don't think he needs to go through all the lessons of how to walk in a line, talk in turn, raise his hand, share, etc. He has that, and he has had opportunities to be away from me to demonstrate those skills.

    I do not think public/private schools are bad places to be. We may very well end up there eventually. I'm not trying to convince you of home schooling. I was just trying to see your responses to see if anything convinced me to send him to regular school.

    And Kinder Preppie, you might do a little research on home schooling since you say you have had many students come from that environment. First of all, the students that are in contact back and forth with the schools could be people that aren't fully invested in home schooling. You can't base your opinions of home schooling on only the ones you come in contact with. It is certainly not just another year of preschool time with mommy, just as daycare isn't an orphanage where parents have nightly visitation.
     
  4. punchinello

    punchinello Comrade

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    Jan 27, 2009

    Kinder Preppie! That was one great post. Now, around here no one homeschools. Our teachers and schools are so fantastic that there is just no way the education could be matched at home. I am a great teacher, but could never do with my kids what they get each day at school. Especially the upper grades! I am blown away by what they bring home...the intensity of study, the creativity, the research opportunities...

    If you live in an area where the schools are terrible, then it may be a different story. Then I might put all my effort in figuring out how to educate my children at home.
     
  5. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    Jan 27, 2009

    Here's a link to a terrific article on socialization you might find interesting...

    http://homeschooling.about.com/gi/d...tor.com/FamilyTimes/articles/10-1article1.htm

    FTR, I think it's a sad state of affairs when a teacher can't recognize there's greater benefit to "smelling flowers" rather than just looking at glossy pictures of them in a textbook. :wow: And to say that kids get nothing from going to the zoo?? :dizzy: Give me a break. All I know is that I never learned to write a check or pay a bill or shop or cook anything other than a crepe or a Snickerdoodle or fill out a job application or get an oil change or program a VCR or mow the grass or very many other "real life skills" in public school. I did learn, however, to cram for tests and avoid the restroom and keep my ideas to myself (especially if they were different from the teacher's ideas) and hide my bad grades and sit out of kickball because I didn't want picked last (again) and smoke a cigarette and lots of other things that haven't been too awful helpful in the real world. Do ya' honestly feel that school is an archetype of the real world?? Cuz I would think being at home and IN the real world would make more sense. I mean, doesn't it make sense that to learn how to live in a place you practice, um, like actually living there? :lol:

    No offense, but asking public school teachers if you should homeschool is like asking a Ford dealer if you should buy a Chevy. :eek:

    Can you tell I'm a homeschooler??
     
  6. 123456now

    123456now Rookie

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    Jan 27, 2009

    That was a great link about socialization. I came here to ask questions because I knew I would get arguments for the other side. There are so many home school web sites, and I have read through a lot of what they have to say. I agree with a big percentage of it. I don't like to be convinced though. I want to come up with my own ideas with all of the information. Home schooling seems like a great opportunity for my family.

    I agree about how ridiculous it is to think that you just smell the flowers and that zoos are for preschoolers. Tell the botanists and zoologists that. I think she knows that too.
     
  7. Kinder Preppie

    Kinder Preppie Rookie

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    Jan 27, 2009

    Thank you for your kind words punchinello...

    I'm glad you have chosen to homeschool, 123456 now. It seems to be a nice choice for you and your son, and I think you'll do a fine job. I am not trying to minimize your choice, just ensure that you are truly exploring all options.

    I have three children of my own... two of which are grown, and one is in high school. I made different school choices for each of them. I truly am very open minded.

    I know that smelling the flowers and spending special time with your son is an awesome thing... and so is the zoo. My kindergarten class ends at 1 p.m. My students are able to go to school and enjoy their peers daily - and enjoy the flowers, special time with their mother and the zoo. Our school is on 11 acres and involves wildlife and so much more...

    You may want to consider school as an extra bonus... just something to think about.

    I don't mean unkind words... and I apologize if I was a bit blunt... really... I just want to open that door for you... and for your son.
     
  8. punchinello

    punchinello Comrade

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    Jan 27, 2009

    queenie, it sounds like you did attend a bad school with teachers who were unable to reach you. Or you just had a hard time, as some students do...

    Life skills are important, but I don't want my kids wasting class time in school learning them. I can teach them that at home. Same for zoo trips.

    None taken. But asking a homeschooler if you should send your child to public school... :eek:
     
  9. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    Jan 27, 2009

    Actually, I attended a pretty normal school and had an A average. I had friends like everybody else...I'm not saying I had an unusually bad time. I'm saying that what I encountered seems par for the course in most schools.

    I'm not just a homeschooler...I have three kids- one graduated with high honors from public school and is about to graduate college- she loved public school and thrived in that environment; my son attended public school through 3rd grade & hated it and is still homeschooled in 9th grade; one is in first grade and I'm not sure if she'll be homeschooled throughout or go to public school. So I guess I'd be a Ford dealer AND a Chevy dealer trying to give an objective opinion (fwiw)...I'm not saying that homeschooling is for every child or every family by ANY stretch of the imagination. And, hello- I teach in a public school- I just get a little aggravated when people put down homeschooling without having all the facts...it CAN be a wonderful source of education and I do believe that just about anyone can do it. I don't think we give parents enough credit- I mean, think about it, by the time kids get to public school age they have learned sooooooo much- how to crawl and walk and feed themselves and use the restroom and talk, etc. It's truly amazing that we expect parents to teach this stuff but think they can't teach kids the basics of education. I mean, really, there's not a whole lot of stuff that I learned in high school that I can still recall. And I was a top student. But life skills- now that's what really counts. That and a desire to continue learning and a working knowledge of where to find what I need to know at any given time...there's so much to learn out there that we'll never know or retain it all!

    BTW, it bothers me that you say you don't want your kid wasting time in public school learning life skills. What the heck are they there for?? Why are they learning math and reading skills if not to use them at some point in 'real life'??
     
  10. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    Jan 27, 2009

    KinderPreppie, I'm sorry --I must have misunderstood your response. It sounded to me like you were making homeschoolers out to be overprotective moms trying to keep their babies from the 'real world.' Not to mention incapable of teaching their children anything useful. I see by your last response that that is NOT your stance. I apologize for jumping to conclusions, Peace?

    123...best of luck in whatever you choose. Because you take parenting so seriously I know that your child will get a great education wherever it takes place :wub:

    I'm truly sorry if I've offended anyone in this thread- I get a little riled up about certain topics and this is one of 'em.
     
  11. 123456now

    123456now Rookie

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    Jan 27, 2009

    No problem. I came to this site for differing opinions, and that's what I got. That's what I wanted. My mother just retired from public school teaching, and I have several in my Sunday School class that are public school teachers. They all think home schooling is a great option that they would use for their own children if they could.

    I think we're going to have so much fun -- yes, him too. I am not making this choice for me or to keep him little. I love seeing him learn and grow and become an independent thinker. I want him to continue his love of learning.

    Thanks again everybody. I hope I have hit the delete button enough times on what I type to be civil to everyone. I know when subjects are sensitive like this, it's hard for everyone to control themselves and leave some things unsaid.
     
  12. Lynnnn725

    Lynnnn725 Connoisseur

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    Jan 27, 2009

    I know you have made up your mind already but I am wondering if he will be the sole person or will he be in a group? How often will he learn with other children present? I ask this because a lot of children learn from other children. Share time is so important because it gives a student the chance to share their thinking - which so often explains the concept better than the teacher!
    I also think that cooperative learning is very valuable, being that most adult jobs require some collaboration with others.

    You sound like you will be a wonderful teacher and your son (and you) will have awesome experiences to remember.
     
  13. 123456now

    123456now Rookie

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    Jan 27, 2009

    Queenie -- Thanks for coming to the defense of home schooling. The more I read about it, the more defensive I get about it too. I think that most objections to it are just due to people not truly understanding how the whole process works.

    Maybe there will be more acceptance in the coming years with the growth that home schooling seems to be seeing. Home school web sites can leave a person saying, "Amen! That's right! Of course!" I felt myself becoming more and more polarized, so I came here for help. However, it's too late. I've been sucked in! I am a home school believer now too! :woot: :thumb:
     
  14. 123456now

    123456now Rookie

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    Jan 27, 2009

    Yes, he will be involved with our local home school group. I have already been talking to a former teacher who will have a kindergarten daughter next year. She is very big on cooperative learning, so I am sure we will be doing some projects together and with others in the group.

    I will also be taking advantage of different classes available at the museum, zoo, art museum, etc. whenever they are available.

    I can't wait!
     
  15. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

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    Jan 27, 2009

    Kids need to learn to deal with this stuff. You don't want to shelter him. I have a little boy in my first grade class who was homeschooled. He is smart. However, he can't deal with someone who cut in front of him, someone who looked at his paper funny, someone who burped in his ear, or when I don't call on him. I am not saying your child will do the same but he has to know these things happen.

    They learn to deal with people not by meeting with them once a week with their parents but by being in a classroom community.

    All that said, congrats for working with your little boy. You sound like a good mommy. I think you had your mind made up on your first post. :)
     
  16. 123456now

    123456now Rookie

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    Jan 27, 2009

    He can handle all of that. The one thing I can see a weakness in is that he is a little passive. If someone takes something from him, he just moves on to something else. We are working on him standing up for himself a little more. He does have a younger sister, and I very rarely intervene on their disputes. I may give them the words to say if needed, but I don't say it for them. I think it's important for them to be able to handle those things and come to an agreement. They almost always do.


    I was definitely leaning heavily on my first post. Who knows? Maybe something will change to make me change my mind, but I'm not seeing it yet.
     
  17. Lynnnn725

    Lynnnn725 Connoisseur

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    Jan 27, 2009

    I think you should homeschool your son. If it doesn't work out quite right for your family, put him in public/private school. He will adjust..adjusting is another skill he will need in life. We had to adjust (and are still adjusting) after Ike....I'm sure your son could adjust after homeschool. You don't want to go on in life thinking I should have done this or that. Try it. If it's not what you expected, change it.
     
  18. Sheila

    Sheila Comrade

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    Jan 27, 2009

    I know in my area there are private schools where 3 days spent at school and 2 days spent at home. This might be a good combination for you.
     
  19. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    Jan 28, 2009

    That really is the case with some homeschool moms. They've told me their reasons, and protecting them from the "real world" is definitely one of them, and they actually use those words. Those are the families that I mentioned (in my first post) who don't do such a great job of homeschooling. I do think that, if the parent has the best intentions, and is willing to work REALLY hard, homeschooling can be great. I also think that parents have to have a lot of resources available, and be willing to seek them out and use them, in order to do it well - especially when kids reach high school and are learning such detailed, subject-specific things.

    What has upset me about this post is that most of us teachers have worked hard to give ideas, opinions and encouragement, and to do it in a positive way. However, when anyone mentioned anything that we perceive as negative about homeschooling, the original poster sounded offended. Really, you have to consider your audience. We're all teachers. 90% of us are going to be pro-school. And if you really want to consider all sides of an argument, you have to consider the negative sides, too.

    Kim
     
  20. 123456now

    123456now Rookie

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    Jan 28, 2009

    I have said repeatedly that I came here for differing opinions and that is what I wanted. I appreciate it all as I have said over and over.

    My stating the positives of home schooling is not being offended. I wanted someone to argue the other side -- as I said. So get un-upset, okay. :)
     
  21. Kindergarten31

    Kindergarten31 Cohort

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    Jan 28, 2009

    Homeschooling is always a 'touchy' subject with teachers. To me it all depends on WHO is doing the homeschooling. My stepson decided to homeschool one of his sons in his first year of high school. He felt the school just wasn't meeting the child's needs. Problem is, my stepson barely graduated high school, himself and was following the homeschool manual word for word not really knowing what he was doing. That barely lasted a year when my grandson just quit and "dropped out' of homeschool. And that was it. Now my other grandson wants to homeschool his son because of "public schools", but really has no ideas about "public schools". I think there are alot of parents out there who really have no idea what is going on in schools today-only what they hear on the news. I think you are qualified and understand education, so will do a bang-up job of teaching your son. Unfortunately, alot of parents who decided to homeschool, don't have the slightest idea of all the dynamics involved. But that's just my opinion.
     
  22. Kinder Preppie

    Kinder Preppie Rookie

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    Jan 28, 2009

    Peace to all from me. Good luck 123456 !!
     
  23. punchinello

    punchinello Comrade

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    Jan 28, 2009

    That would not be the strongest argument for homeschooling. If anyone can do it, then it mustn't be very good...

    queenie, your expectations of a quality education and mine just don't match. Balancing checkbooks and trips to the zoo are at the bottom of the hierarchy to me.

    I expect my childrens' teachers to expand and enrich and challenge them in ways that I can't. They are taking classes like Constitutional Law, Creative Writing, Anthropology, AP Psychology/Biology/Literature...The teachers are trained how to use problem solving, higher level thinking skills (critical and creative). Sure, I could teach the basics from the text book. But that isn't real quality.

    I can do a lot from home with them. But the more they are exposed to new ideas from other teachers, the better. Why limit them to just one style year after year?
     
  24. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    Mar 3, 2009

    I'm afraid this is all we're going to agree on in this post! :hugs:
     

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