What would you do?

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by 123456now, Jan 16, 2009.

  1. 123456now

    123456now Rookie

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    Jan 16, 2009

    I need the opinions of actual kindergarten teachers to help me make a decision regarding my four-year-old son. He will be five in April. He has always been home with me, never in a preschool classroom. He goes to gymnastics, preschool choir, library story time, Sunday School, has played soccer and hated it and will be playing t-ball in May (his choice).

    He has always had a strong desire to learn. He is reading simple books now, like the Otto series, some Dick and Jane, a little Seuss and some other random early readers. He loves, loves, loves to write and draw and can spell several words by sounding them out by himself. He also knows several sight words.

    He can do simple addition and subtraction with the use of blocks and without the use of blocks. He totally understands colors, shapes, and even how to mix to come up with different colors. He follows directions very well and has never once not gotten both of his Tootsie Rolls in gymnastics in 2 years, and they are stingy with the Tootsie Rolls. He is polite and considerate and follows rules with no problems.

    We go to the zoo, library, museum and wherever else that has something interesting going on. He has several friends that we play with and has one really, really close friend.

    My question is, knowing that, if you had the option of homeschooling him next year, would you? I just really hate to have him be ahead and get bored and deal with children who behave badly at this age because he truly has a love of learning. I don't want him to lose that. I will probably send him to public school at some point, but right now does not seem like the time. What would you, as a kindergarten teacher, do for your child?

    Thank you for your opinions. I was happy to come across this site because I want the opinions of those who really know what the classroom realities are.
     
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  3. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Jan 16, 2009

    Children learn at different rates. While your son many be advanced now, this level of learning may level out as he goes to school and more activites are present in his life.

    It seems like you have the academics under control, so I would send him to Kindergarten for the socialization. I don't think he will be bored, because he will have opportunities to hear the academics explained in different words.

    Part of going to school is to learn how to deal with various types of people. Those social skills are more likely to be taught in Kindergarten.

    You will be a better mom as well, as you will have some time to re-charge yourself, and plan great home activities to enrich his life.
     
  4. 123456now

    123456now Rookie

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    Jan 16, 2009

    I forgot to mention that there is an active home school group here in our town that gets together every Friday for activities at a local church with skating and bowling and also has co-op studies, field trips and parties. So he would have a lot of opportunities to interact with his age group and others with that group in addition to the other things we would do.
     
  5. punchinello

    punchinello Comrade

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    Jan 17, 2009

    Really interesting question. Hmmmm... A couple of thoughts-
    Even if he is ahead with the literacy and math skills, he shouldn't be bored. I have a student who can read fluently and do mostly 2nd grade math. She is bright and quick and knows everything before I teach it. She is never bored. But her imagination is great and she is always engaged and focused. Public school teachers usually (depending on your district) are very well trained in how to challenge different skill levels in a classroom. Quick learners are usually self-driven and find ways to keep themselves interested.

    You mention that the other kids will have poor behavior. Not true, but even if they do, your son needs to learn how to get along with all different social situations. There is a lot of value in learning how to work out conflicts or even just watching how bad behavior can be modified.

    Go to the school and observe. Only then can you truly judge what would be best.
     
  6. sevenplus

    sevenplus Connoisseur

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    Jan 17, 2009

    I agree about going to the school to observe. And that he won't necessarily be bored.

    You have to examine your own heart, I guess. If you are really wanting to homeschool then just go ahead and do that. If he is thriving at home and with the other activities you have him involved in there is really no need to change that.

    However, there is so much more to school than academics and he may love it. You can always enroll him and then pull him out at any point if it isn't working out.

    My son is not yet 3 1/2. He is blending sounds to read words and also knows a handful of sight words. He is really, really interested in reading, math, and science. He is already above where many of my K students start. I still intend to send him to public school, even though that's a year and a half away.
     
  7. starbucks

    starbucks Comrade

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    Jan 17, 2009

    First of all, I must congratulate you on exposing your child to so many things at such an early age. I teach in a lower income area and so many of my kids haven't done much except play video games when they come to me, so hearing your story is quite refreshing! With that being said, however, I agree with the other posters. I don't think that he will be bored. I had a child several years ago that was already doing long division and reading Harry Potter books in Kindergarten. You name it and he could do it. Socially, however, he was a typical kindergartener. He loved play time, being with his friends, playing outside at recess etc.. If you really want to home school him then I think you should, but If you think that you want to try public school then I think you should start him right off the bat in kindergarten. Kindergarten is the grade level where they learn how to function in the school. Things like how to eat in the cafeteria, how to ride the bus, how to walk in the halls, how to bring home and take back homework, how get around the building etc... All of the kids in his class will learn how to do these things together. If you wait until 2nd or 3rd grade for him to try public school then he will be learning those things on his own.
     
  8. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Jan 17, 2009

    If you want to home school and you feel like you can provide him with a good education, I say go for it. If your only concern is that he will be bored at school/not challenged, I would probably send him to school. Call your local school and ask if you can talk to a K teacher or visit a room after school to see what kinds of learning opportunities there are. Most K teachers are used to having kids on all levels and it does tend to level out as they progress in school. I had kids who read very well on the first day of school and kids that could only name 3 or 4 letters. We are used to differentiating and providing kids with appropriate learning challenges to keep them engaged.
     
  9. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    Jan 17, 2009

    OK--T-1 teacher here, mother of two, one is currently a Kindergartener. My daughter and son both were academically ready for the demands of kinder. They both read, added to ten without manipulatives (son did word problems with sums of 20 or more), and very social. My daughter was the ideal student, cared about others, did all her work, tried to please the teacher, never got anything but a green on discipline report, etc. But in January we noticed a trend. She only played with the same two children. She was very insecure about her ability. And she was smaller and younger than anyone in her class. I talked to the teacher, the principal, and the counselor. After little discussion, my husband and I decided to retain her in kindergarten. We started preparing her for this. We talked about the wonderful teacher she would have this year. We visited her room before and after school. The principal discussed it with her. She was prepared for the year. All of last year and all of this year she has nothing but perfect on her assessments. We were a little worried about boredom, but her wonderful Kindergarten teacher levels for reading, has leveled centers, and offers enrichment for her. She takes Reading Counts! tests (like AR) and makes perfect on them. She is the leader this year. She is the social one that organizes play on the playground.

    My son was so smart. His IQ is very high, but he was only around older children. He was the child that finished his work and poked the child next to him to play. He was the one that would give away the ending to the story the teacher was reading. He had a wonderful memory and could remember all the stories he heard. We decided that T-1 was the place for him.

    My point is that even though they may be the brightest child in class, that is not always what Kindergarten is about. There is so much more involved. This is a gut decision. We went with out guts and made very different choices for our children. But the final thing is how you and your child handle your decision.
     
  10. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    Jan 17, 2009

    This is a hard question. If you plan to eventually send him to school I would start him off in kindergarten. The older students get the harder it is for them to adjust to the school and the environment.
     
  11. 123456now

    123456now Rookie

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    Jan 17, 2009

    Thank you for all of your responses. You bring up some good points. I do need to go observe a class. I just don't want to become "that mom" before my kids even start to school. Know what I mean?

    I'm not only concerned about boredom. I also think that kids are over scheduled a lot of times. He really likes gymnastics, but I'm afraid we would have to give that up when he starts school. He also wants to play t-ball and learn to play the guitar. I would never schedule him for all of that if he were in regular school.

    Family time takes such a back burner in our society now, and I don't really want to feel like the school is taking so much of it away and adding homework to the little time we do have together.

    Thank you for giving me some things to think about from your point of view. My gut tells me to home school, but I don't want to make any decision regarding my children without really considering all of the options.
     
  12. punchinello

    punchinello Comrade

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    Jan 18, 2009

    You are so right about family time! That must come first and sometimes it takes a lot of effort to make sure we sit down to dinner together.
    But I don't think going to school is the optional activity here. The other stuff like gymnastics, guitar, t-ball, etc. are optional.

    1. family
    2. school
    3. friends, free unsupervised play
    4. lessons, organized sports

    JMO
     
  13. Dzenna

    Dzenna Groupie

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    Jan 18, 2009

    Social skills, not academics, are what affect school adjustment most in kindergarten.

    Play behavior is a very important skill. Participating in structured activities with a home-school group is not play. Play is just play. Your child needs play behavior skills with all types of children including children who behave badly. At one time or another, all children behave badly!

    Your son needs to know how to enter a social group. He needs to be able to read the emotions on other children's faces. He needs communication skills such as being able to take part in a conversation, listen to others, and negotiate.

    Another important skill is the ability to participate in fantasy games and take part in making-up and extending the make-believe story.
    Some children may need assistance in learning how to play make-believe with others.

    Whether or not in a structured kindergarten, offer your son the opportunity to play in a group on a regular basis to develop or increase these skills.
     
  14. 123456now

    123456now Rookie

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    Jan 18, 2009

    I agree that school is not optional. I think it is extremely important. I just think that the public school setting wastes a lot of time that could be used in better ways like family, friends and other activities.

    I think his social skills are excellent. He, like any child, could still work on them and practice what he knows. The home school group here in town has a Friday play day. They skate, bowl, do whatever they want at a local church activity center.

    We have had a lot of chances to play with children that behave badly. Not so fun for me or him. Just a day at the park gives you ample opportunity for that. He is shocked by their behavior, and I would kind of like it to stay that way. At choir, a boy he had never seen before walked in the room and pushed him down. He fell and hit his back on the chair behind him and just looked completely stunned. He didn't cry or anything, but how is being around that behavior a good thing? It's a teaching moment for the child who is a bully, but why should my child help him learn that lesson? No amount of getting pushed down and dealing with it correctly would have kept that boy from knocking him down.

    He absolutely loves to play dress up and does so on an almost daily basis with role playing. I can't tell you how many times my oven has been fixed, my blood pressure has been checked or I have been saved from an attack of bad pirates.

    I love the responses here. They are giving me great things to be conscious of as it gets closer to school starting. I very much appreciate you taking the time to respond.
     
  15. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Jan 18, 2009

    I was homeschooled and loved it! I was also in public school for a while but got Cs, Ds, maybe Bs. But when I went into home school, I actually started to get things. When I was in public school, I focused more on socializing and playing, and not on academics.


    I teach kinder, yet, if I had a child, I would home school them too. One year, I had a pretty high group of kids. I modified our kindergarten programt to meet their needs. Well, the P found out and lectured me on how I was supposed to follow the program word for word. I explained that I had high kids and that they would be bored if I did the program exactly. He said that we are to follow the program. And that was that. Soooo.... if you do decide to put your child into public school, I would ask them about their kindergarten programs and how they would meet your child needs.

    It sounds like you really want to home school your son, and I see nothing wrong with that.
     
  16. 123456now

    123456now Rookie

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    Jan 18, 2009

    Thank you for sharing your experience. I taught school for one year -- longest year of my life. Long story, but basically I wanted to teach junior high math, and instead, I was to teach journalism to a mixed group of sixth to eighth graders, some of whom didn't know what a noun was and some who were completely capable of writing stories for the school paper.

    As well intentioned as you are, you are only one person who can only do so much. I know my bright kids could have done so, so, so, so, so much more if I hadn't been spending so much time with my lower kids. I wanted to take a trip to our local newspaper, but I had kids with behavior problems so bad I wouldn't have taken them to the lunchroom.

    I'm sure my experience is on the extreme end, but I do feel for teachers. There is so much expected and only so much time.
     
  17. MissR

    MissR Comrade

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    Jan 18, 2009

    In my opinion, nothing is better for a child's academic growth than one-on-one from a good teacher. It sounds like you are a good teacher for your son and he is learning a lot. If you make sure he gets the social aspect of playing with and learning with and completing projects with kids his age, you're doing great! I think all teachers in schools wish they were able to spend more one-on-one time with each child, we wish we could cater to every child's individual needs, but we just plain can't. You can, and you want to, so do it!
     
  18. Dzenna

    Dzenna Groupie

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    Jan 18, 2009

    I agree with you that playing with children who behave badly is not fun for you or your son. I still remember the day when I was watching my 4-year old son on the Pre-K playground for the first time. He started to climb on the the play structure and 2 boys on the structure told him that he couldn't play. I wanted to jump over the fence, run to the structure, and tell those boys everyone can play on the structure. (Actually I wanted to smack them for being mean to my son!). I watched as my son played with some other boys on another part of the playground and eventually they all ended up playing together on the structure. My son is now 16 and I still remember the pain of that moment. I can tell you the names of those 2 boys! I am sure my son had other similar experiences that I did not see (thankfully). That is how he learned how to interact with friends and bullies.

    A good Preschool or Kindergarten teacher watches these interactions and works with both the bullies and those being bullied. Kids won't get this type of supervision or guidance at a park.

    Homeschooling can be the best way to educate many children, but make sure they get consistant group play with a regular group of children.
     
  19. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    Jan 18, 2009

    Well, first, you have to remember your audience...you're asking a group of kindergarten teachers if you should send your child to kindergarten! Most of us would say yes, simply because we love our jobs so much that we want everyone to share in that love.

    For some reason, in this area, it's a trend to send your kids to the public school for PreK (which I teach) so that they get the socialization, and then homeschool from that point on. I have to say, for some families, it's been a great choice and I see kids (and families) that are thriving. For others, it's not worked so well. So, really, you have to examine your heart and do what you feel you can do best for your child. It may be homeschooling, it may not. Only you can know that for sure.

    You should also know that kids listen completely differently to a teacher in a class than they do at a park. I've witnessed some behavior in parks (and at birthday parties, playdates, mall play areas, etc) that is truly awful.

    I also wanted to point out that there are some social skills that you can't learn without being in the same setting, with the same adult and groups of kids, on a regular, long-term basis. We have a center here called the Ben Frankin center where homeschooled kids meet a few times a week for a few hours at a time for tutoring and group enrichment classes - it's not a homeschool organization (which tends to be run by parents and the outings and classes are optional), it's run more like a part-time school, run by a "teacher," where the kids are grouped by ability, not age. I think this is a great compromise.
     
  20. Dzenna

    Dzenna Groupie

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    Jan 18, 2009

    :clap:

    :clap: :clap:

    Very well said, Kim.
     
  21. ecsmom

    ecsmom Habitué

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    Jan 18, 2009

    No offense intended but I think you should home school your son. I teach in a Title school and have children with behavior problems and academic needs. I also have one mom who continually complains about the behavior of other students as well as the curriculum we use. Her daughter is bright but not the brightest in the class as she seems to think. I wish she had home schooled her daughter. It would allow me more time to teach the ones who need me rather than listen to mom and daughter tattle and complain. Again no offense intended, just my honest opinion.
     
  22. punchinello

    punchinello Comrade

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    Jan 18, 2009

    LOL
    I have yet to meet a mom of a 5 year old who doesn't think her child is gifted. Me included! Eventually you come to see that she/he is bright, but not the brightest. I remember my daughter knew everything before the teacher taught it. It was my job to supplement her education at home. And she was "ahead" for a few years. As the curricula became more intense, I was able to help her less and less. The teachers in our district are outstanding and did a MUCH better job than I ever could. She maintained solid A's and B's. Physics, AP Psych., Calculus...ugh! I don't know how she did it all on her own. But there were always kids performing better with solid A's in all honors and AP classes. Really amazing how many bright, driven students are out there with GPA's higher than 4.0!

    But she did get a good sense of confidence from those early years, even if other kids caught up by 4th, 5th grade...She always did well in school, but wasn't the 4.3 GPA and perfect SAT score student that I thought she would be when she was 5.

    And you know what? It doesn't matter a bit. But you can't tell that to a first time parent. :)
     
  23. 123456now

    123456now Rookie

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    Jan 18, 2009

    Just because I am considering homeschooling my son does not mean I would constantly complain or even ever complain. I am merely trying to get opinions from every group involved so that I can make the best decision possible for my child. I know where I could hear everything I want to hear. I've already heard that. I am just here wanting the other side.

    Thank you all for your perspectives. It has really been helpful.
     
  24. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

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    Jan 19, 2009

    I haven't read anyone else's comments yet, but the other thing to think about is that even though your child may be "ahead" at this time, for most kids it evens out by the 3rd grade.
     
  25. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Jan 19, 2009

    If it helps any, I homeschool my own children....

    My reasons are varied. The foremost reason is that I have a child in a competitive sport and his training schedule got evil, but beyond that the schools in this area are terrible. You can do a great job homeschooling if you're organized and dedicated. The socialization thing is a non-issue. There are tons of homeschool groups and various other activities in which you can enroll your child. Good luck, and welcome to homeschooling. It's very rewarding.
     
  26. SpecSub

    SpecSub Comrade

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    Jan 19, 2009

    I work as an aide in kindergarten - 2nd grade. Kudos to you for caring so much and, as others have said, exposing your child to so many things.

    We just finished some kindergarten math and reading assessments, and there is such a varied group. I have one child reading on a 4th grade level and comprehending on a 3rd. Some children's strengths lie in reading comprehension - our school does 90 minutes/day of reading and writing. How well does your child comprehend stories? In math, can he read a number problem and recognize addition, subtraction and equal signs? Most of what you said your child knows meets mid-year benchmarks. So I don't really see that he would be bored. Ahead of many kids, yes, but behind many others.

    Socially, he needs to learn how to function with other children outside of his mother's presence. He can socialize at lunch and free play and centers. He will learn how to work with a partner and within a group. Things like that. In my school, he would also be taking art, music, P.E. and library.
     
  27. Kinder Preppie

    Kinder Preppie Rookie

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    Jan 26, 2009

    Kindergarten, kindergarten, kindergarten !! I cannot agree more with the letters above.... Kindergarten is sooo much more than education... and offers soooo much more than homeschooling. Please don't misunderstand me... homeschooling is certainly fine for some... but kindergarten is much, much different. I work in a small private school... just 9 children in the kinder class. Perhaps something like this would be more appropriate to start...
     
  28. 123456now

    123456now Rookie

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    Jan 26, 2009


    I have been doing a lot of research on home schooling over the past several months. I asked this question here on this forum basically to try to have someone talk me out of home schooling because I still haven't found a good reason to send him to a regular school.

    Done correctly, I really can't see what he will be missing out on at home. We will absolutely be involved with our local home school group because I want him to have more friends. We will be able to take weekly trips to the zoo (or more if we want). We will be taking art classes at the local children's museum.

    He will be learning to play the piano for his music lessons and possibly the guitar if he still would like that. He will be taking gymnastics and/or t-ball for P.E. He will get to have a weekly play day at a local church where he can skate, bowl, play or whatever with other kids -- some older, which I think is great and helpful.

    I don't see where "socialization" can be taught by a group of five-year-old children who are only sometimes corrected for their behavior (because teachers cannot see all). I think being around a group of varied ages is much better. We will also be volunteering at the local food bank and hopefully other volunteer opportunities will arise. I think I must have a different view of what true socialization is than a lot of people. I don't think my child needs to learn a lot of what the other kids know. If that makes him unusual, I say, "Yeah!"

    I think we are going to have a great time at home, and we are both looking forward to it. It's not for everyone, but I really feel like it is the right choice for our family. We are looking forward to picking up at a moment's notice and heading out to see the wildflowers in addition to reading about them. We will visit the giraffe when a story comes up and sit and look at it while we illustrate a little story about them.

    How can that be seen as any less of an education? It's the connections that matter. If you can read about, see, hear and experience different topics, you, as teachers, know that so much more of that information will be retained. It'll be a heck of a lot more fun too. I know many teachers would love to set up their classes that way, but it is not possible because of funding and logistics.

    If I can provide all of that to my child in addition to him having plenty of social opportunities and free play opportunities, wouldn't I be doing him a disservice to send him to regular school? Sorry for going off on a long thing about home schooling, but as you can see, I think I've made up my mind.

    I do really thank you all for your input. I absolutely didn't want to go into a decision like this without getting input from many places and many points of view. He's my child, and I absolutely want what's best for him. We are thankful for teachers such as yourselves too! Your job is so, so, so important and valuable!
     
  29. SpecSub

    SpecSub Comrade

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    Jan 26, 2009

    Your homeschooling plan sounds fine. However, I still think the best socialization comes from being around kids who are NOT perfect all the time. Kids learn that an adult will not solve ALL of their interpersonal issues. Serious ones, yes. But minor ones need to be worked out by the kids without mom around to make sure everything is nice and fair at all times. Your child seems to behave very well, and congratulations on teaching him that. But let him learn to stand up for himself and work with others in an imperfect world.

    I understand the fear of letting your child around kids whose behavior scares you. I'm sending a kid off to middle school next year. You bet I want to keep him close to me and safe from hurt feelings at all times, but I remind myself that he will be with kids his own age, having age-appropriate fun and conflicts. Your child will be with other kids his own age. He can handle kids his own age. They're not demons, even when they act up, and in my experience, very few REALLY act up in a horrible way.
     
  30. 123456now

    123456now Rookie

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    Jan 26, 2009

    I don't think the other kids are so bad, but I do think so many have their priorities really messed up. I teach preschool/kindergarten choir at church, and there are kids who bring their cell phones! I just don't want him to feel like he is less because he doesn't have a Wii, won't have a cell phone for a long time (I don't even use one still -- can't stand being found all the time), etc. When you are a child, you are so susceptible to those little ridiculous differences. I still wish I had had a Poco Paris purse!

    He does have a tendency to step aside when kids are pushy, and we are working on that. I don't want him to fight back, but I do want him to stand firm. He has already made great strides in that area just as he gets older.

    Many might think this is awful too, but we watch Super Nanny together for fun. He gets a kick out of watching those kids, and always talks about how Super Nanny will help them because they aren't bad kids, they are just making bad choices. Great educational opportunity!
     
  31. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jan 26, 2009

    Here's my major gripe with homeschooling:

    I know that it takes me several years of a prep to really get it down. The first time I teach a new course, I'm pretty tentative about it. The second time, I'm much better grounded in the material. Buy the third year, I've got a good handle on what to teach and how best to teach it.

    But if I homeschooled my 3 kids, my son (the oldest) would have a first year teacher in every single course he took! My middle child would have a second year teacher in each and every subject. Only my youngest would get what I would consider to be a "good" teacher who was really familiar with how best to approach the material.
     
  32. 123456now

    123456now Rookie

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    I see your point, but you also have a new group of students each year with a new set of needs and abilities. A lot of classroom teaching is classroom management, and each year, you have a new dynamic to deal with. So really, in public school, you have to learn a new set of students each year and teach the same subjects. At home, you teach new subjects but with the same students that have learning styles that you can completely design your lessons around.
     
  33. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jan 26, 2009

    I'm not talking classroom management. At this point in my career, it's not a major issue.

    I'm talking familiarity with the material, with the implications and intricaticies, with the connections that can be made, with what to emphasize this year because it will be important next year, with the right explanation to choose-- all that, at least for me, comes from teaching a course several times.

    In all my years of teaching, I've somehow never taught 8th grade math. (I've done 7 and 9, but never 8.) I can tell you right now: as of today, I'm a MUCH better teacher at Intro to Calculus or Precalc or Algebra II & Trig or Geometry or Algebra I or Math 7 (or any other courses I've taught that aren't offered in my school anymore) than I am at Math 8.

    OF COURSE I know the material. But the proper emphasis, the timing, the anticipating the problems the kids are going to have with the material... all that comes with experience in THAT course.
     
  34. 123456now

    123456now Rookie

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    I totally agree that the more you teach it, the more you understand it. Then, you are more able to explain it to your students, but the fact remains that not all students learn the same.

    Don't you agree that tailoring lessons to one student's learning style would result in more learning? Don't you agree that being able to stay on one subject until it is fully understood before moving on would be a benefit? Don't you agree that sailing through what is easily understood would be a better use of time?

    I'm just saying that I think the two kind of balance each other out. Also, with homeschooling, when you get to the higher grades, you can take things online or through coops with local teachers if you come across a subject that would be better taught by someone else. We have a local science center that does a six-week study on genetics, for example, specifically designed for home schoolers. Just because a student is home schooled does not necessarily mean their only teacher is their mother.
     
  35. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jan 26, 2009

    Good luck!
     
  36. 123456now

    123456now Rookie

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    Thanks! It'll be a learning experience for both of us.
     
  37. ecsmom

    ecsmom Habitué

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    You came here looking for reponses to talk you out of homeschooling. Others have given you good information but you have had a valid counter argument for each one. I really feel that you will be happier if you homeschool.
     
  38. 123456now

    123456now Rookie

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    Yes, everyone has given me great information. I do really appreciate it. That's exactly what I was looking for. I have a great list of things to be very conscious of next year to make sure that he is progressing as he should. Thanks again.
     
  39. Kinder Preppie

    Kinder Preppie Rookie

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    Jan 27, 2009

    I appreciate your decision to homeschool, but please allow me to point out some missing links.

    Children in your sons academic realm learn from others more advanced. You would be amazed at the academic and social level of some children. Absolutely amazed....

    A child within a classroom setting learns patience and empathy - rather than assuming that children are making poor choices in behavior, they learn that everyone is not the same, and some children actually are unable to make proper choices, just as some are unable to read.

    I get a lot of prior homeschooled children in my classroom. They are missing soooo many skills required for everyday living. Parents just don't see that when they are going to the zoo, etc.

    Remember, children behave much differently when a parent is not present. It is part of accepting responsibility for one's own actions, and being responsible for oneself.

    If you choose to homeschool, just remember, it is just like keeping him home with mommy for one extra year. It's not like going to school.

    Upon arrival in first grade, the children will already have friends from the year before, they will have played together in the summer, they will have already learned the kindergarten socialization skills that he will not have learned...

    There is nothing wrong with staying home with your child and smelling the flowers, etc. But that is for pre-schoolers... and a kindergartener is a big boy.

    Remember, keeping him home is giving you something special. You are able to spend more quality time with him, you are able to teach him what you know, you are able to baby him for one more year.

    Allowing him to go to school is enabling him to be a true kindergartener. It is his socialization time... it is his time to enjoy...

    You've had your turn... consider letting go and let him have his. From his eyes, you really don't know what he will miss.
     
  40. ecsmom

    ecsmom Habitué

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    Jan 27, 2009

    Kinder Preppie, based on the OPs last reply, I believe she plans on homeschooling her son through HS not just in Kindergarten.
     
  41. Kinder Preppie

    Kinder Preppie Rookie

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    Jan 27, 2009

    Thanks for the update. She originally said it was not a long term thought. Sorry.... As both a parent and a teacher, I just wanted to get some last minute ideas in... :)
     

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