What would it take to legally establish teacher unions in states where they are currently banned?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by MrTempest, Apr 23, 2019.

  1. Aces

    Aces Habitué

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    May 3, 2019

    Maybe it's just a matter of syntax but they took enough personal days they had to shut school districts down. I mean that sounds like a strike to me. Even if it was just for a day.
     
  2. MrTempest

    MrTempest Companion

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    May 3, 2019

    You make references to unions in your examples. I am referring to areas without unions.
     
  3. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    May 3, 2019

    No, a strike is when employees are out until their demands are met or negotiations are made. However long it takes. It is expected that ALL employees join in solidarity. Employees purposefully bring production to a standstill and the threat of not going back is what gives them leverage.

    This rally only shut down schools because the conditions are so bad that there aren't enough subs to cover. Most employees refrained from taking the day off. Everyone knew that school would continue the next day. It was for attention, not coercion.
     
  4. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Fanatic

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    May 3, 2019

    All 50 states plus District of Columbia have teacher's unions. I live in Arizona and know a lot about the unions here. I don't know of a decent sized district in Arizona that doesn't have a teacher's union. This is coming from a state that is dead last in teacher's union strength. (see article link below).
    The point is that all states and nearly all districts have unions. Just some teacher unions are weaker than others.
    https://fordhaminstitute.org/nation...-are-us-teacher-unions-state-state-comparison
     
    futuremathsprof likes this.
  5. MrTempest

    MrTempest Companion

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    May 6, 2019

    I am not talking about Teacher Associations, I am talking about unions. Even the report you cited stated the following in its link for Georgia, "Compared to teacher unions in other states, Georgia’s associations are not particularly involved in state politics."

    Check this out:
    https://www.businessinsider.com/states-where-teachers-unions-are-illegal-2011-2
     
  6. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    May 6, 2019

    These associations are unions. It is just that their activities are curtailed in different states because of state laws.

    Are you really asking why some states can ban certain union activity?
     
  7. tchr4vr

    tchr4vr Companion

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    May 7, 2019

    This is not the norm--I saw the opposite. When i worked in NYC (one of the most powerful unions in the country) I taught in a closet, no texts, no materials, and was teaching at least one subject I was unqualified to teach - ESL. And this was my first year teaching. In my right-to-work state, while it hasn't been perfect, I pretty much get what I need, my class sizes are generally around 25 (there are exceptions) and my pay, pension and benefits are just as good as in the union state (I live in a much lower cost-of-living area, so my paycheck goes much farther)
     

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