What went wrong?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by missml, Aug 6, 2012.

  1. missml

    missml Rookie

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    Aug 6, 2012

    I just got a rejection via email today. This was my 5th interview this summer (3 were in person and 2 were phone interviews). Would it be okay for me to reply to the principal's email and ask what areas I could improve on for future interviews?
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Aug 6, 2012

    The answer will probably be along the lines of...we found someone with more experience or another candidate was a better fit for the team/school/direction they are going:sorry:

    Do you know a principal or someone who has served on an interview committee who might be able to give you a 'mock' interview and offer feedback?
     
  4. geoteacher

    geoteacher Devotee

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    Aug 6, 2012

    I think you can ask, but be prepared not to get much of a response. This is a very busy time of year in the school offices!
     
  5. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Aug 6, 2012

    I agree. Like, czacza said though they probably won't tell you much. :hugs:
     
  6. missml

    missml Rookie

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    That's exactly what I heard from the other interviewers. Either they found someone with more experience or they hired an internal candidate. Are 5 interviews a lot or am I overreacting a bit? I'm just becoming more and more discouraged. I wouldn't mind subbing another year, but it's impossible to survive on that pay and no benefits without adding on another part-time position :unsure:
     
  7. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    I only did this once and I received a very frank response that I was kind of offended by until I realized it was true. Since I wasn't getting hired I decided I would just tell the next principal I interviewed with everything I thought they wanted to hear. When answering a classroom management question I discussed the very nice and gentle classroom management theories I learned all about in school. In his e-mail, he told me his students wouldn't take me seriously (very urban school, in a bad district). I never told anyone what I thought they wanted to hear again. I later subbed in that district and that Principal clearly knew what he was doing. He should probably be running the whole district.
     
  8. HistTchr

    HistTchr Habitué

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    Aug 6, 2012

    Like others mentioned, the principal is probably busy with beginning of the year craziness, but I don't think it would hurt to send an email. If you don't find a position, don't forget to check out long-term sub openings in your subject area. That is a great way of getting your foot in the door somewhere.
     
  9. racm

    racm Rookie

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    Aug 6, 2012

    I don't think that 5 is a lot in this economy. I had 7 before landing my position.
     
  10. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    Aug 7, 2012

    I think it's smart of you to want to ask, so feel free to do so. However, I would imagine the others are right and you might not get as open a response as you would like. Either way, definitely practice with sample questions with someone who can judge you and provide insightful feedback.

    However, I also don't think the fact that you didn't get the job necessarily means there's something wrong with your interview skills. I don't know what the job market is like by you but I've been told that there can be 1000 or more applicants for open positions by me. From there, schools often interview at least 10 candidates for each position - sometimes much more than that. These are not great odds, unfortunately. Also, there are frequently internal candidates who have a big edge. Finally, there can be other factors as well. I know for one of my positions, the people interviewing me were very interested in the fact that I lived in town and I was active in the community. Sometimes, they pick someone because they have very specific experience that the interviewer is looking for. It's also very subjective. A friend of mine is a secretary at a private school and she told me that, for the last position they had to fill, the interview team had a lot of trouble agreeing about the candidates. One person might think the candidate was very good, the other would think the complete opposite.

    So, what I'm saying is, go ahead and polish your skills as best you can but don't beat yourself up over this either.
     
  11. Rainbowbird

    Rainbowbird Groupie

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    Aug 7, 2012

    :yeahthat:

    It is very competitive. If there are ten highly qualified candidates being interviewed, and only one can be hired, that doesn't mean that the other nine did a terrible job. There are so many factors that go into hiring. I was told that one reason I was hired for my first job was because I was very calm and quiet. The p. decided he had enough extroverted chatterboxes on staff and was trying to balance things out. You just never know what they are looking for...you can ask their opinion but due to legal reasons they we will probably just give you a very general response.

    How did you feel leaving these interviews? Did you feel that you did well and made a connection?
     
  12. dream2bateach

    dream2bateach Rookie

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    Aug 7, 2012

    There's a huge disconnect between what we're taught in our college classes and the real world of education. I know, surprise, surprise, right? The gentle approach is what I was taught in school also and I feel that also hurt me in an interview I had last week. Granted, this was for an in-school suspension aide, but I answered that I try to maintain a balance between being firm, while also trying to get to know the student on a personal basis to see if I can work with him to see what's causing his disciplinary problems. And then we would try to correct them. I don't think they liked the wishy washy part of my answer on getting to know the student on a personal level, etc. The principal then went on to explain what his ideal candidate would be for this position. He went on to say that when he was in in-school suspension as a student himself, it was not a fun place to be and that the teacher was a no-nonsense, get your work done, don't talk to me kind of person. I knew right then and there that I was screwed. From now on, in my interviews, I'm just going to tell give them straight up answers and not some academic non-sense that has no bearing in the real world classroom.
     
  13. Pisces_Fish

    Pisces_Fish Fanatic

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    Aug 7, 2012

    As others have said, I doubt you'd get anything constructive from a P this time of year, they're just so busy. One thing I truly think helped me land my job offer was knowing the school and the district. I really took the time to research, and the questions I asked at the end reflected that. Have you gone to your interviews knowing as much as you could find about the school?
     

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