What was your SAT/ACT score?

Discussion in 'Debate & Marathon Threads Archive' started by fedfanforever11, Jun 6, 2011.

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  1. MandaNicole01

    MandaNicole01 Habitué

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    :wow:I feel as though I wrote this! I get asked the EXACT same thing! Someone once told me my talent was being "wasted" being a kindergarten teacher!!! REALLY!? I mean, you want someone who isn't smart teaching!? Come on people!!! Thankfully, my dad, an intelligent man and EXCELLENT award winning teacher (had to brag;)) was very proud of me for choosing the profession and backed me up every step of the way! I agree!!! We HAVE to attract the best and brightest! After all, I want the best and brightest to teach my children...don't you?!:)
     
  2. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    I find this whole thread funny because I just read a page that said that teachers' mean IQ score is around 121-123.

    http://www.sq.4mg.com/IQ-jobs.htm

    I'm not discussing the validity of my source, just stating that it is funny to me.

    Supposedly that's smart.
     
  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    It doesn't. It goes up to and including high school geometry, but stops short of Algebra II/Trig. Prior to 1994, it stopped pretty much with Algebra I, with the only geometry being concepts that are frequently introduced in middle school.

    In theory, a typical sophomore should know all the material on the exam at the end of the year. Of course, knowing the material is only part of the battle.
     
  4. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Wait...you're saying that being smart and/or a good test taker is DETRIMENTAL to teaching?????

    I see your point about struggling. I once worked with a math teacher who was incredibly strong with the good kids-- she was really able to pull great things out of them that they didn't know they had. But put a struggling kid in front of her, and she was lost; she simply couldn't see what they didn't get.

    But I'm not sure her attitude transfers to all smart people. I certainly consider myself fairly bright, and I hope it doesn't transfer to me. Based on the feedback I've gotten over the years, from kids and parents and administrators, I'm confident it doesn't.

    Here's what I think it all boils down to: Teachers need a whole lot of skills and attributes. Intelligence is certainly one of them, and "book smarts" is another. And there are a whole lot more, ranging from compassion to kindness to empathy to the ability to keep a lot of balls in the air at once to the ability to get along with other to the ability to take and give direction to serindipity.

    And I'm not sure which, if any of those, the SAT actually measures. In all my years of SAT prep, I'm pretty sure the SAT measures your ability to take the SAT.

    But I do think that simply "loving kids" is NOT enough, by a long shot. I think we have a right to expect, to demand, that our teachers have a broad based pool of knowledge. So, no, maybe you don't need calculus to teach 3rd grade, but I'm OK with you having seen it. And I may never have to know the 3 parts of government or Eminent Domain to teach math, but I would be embarassed if a kid in my homeroom asked me and I didn't know them. I figure that just about anything that my high school kids need to know to graduate should certainly be part of my pool of knowledge, with the exception of the variety of foreign languages.

    Sure, sometimes my response in homeroom is "Sorry... I used to know that, but it was a long time ago. I think it's___________ Let's use my computer to find you the right phrasing."

    But I think it's way past time we stopped accepting intellectual mediocrity, combined with the ever-present "loving kids" as being enough from our teachers and teacher candidates.
     
  5. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    I agree Alice! It's important to both know our stuff AND be able to teach it.
     
  6. KatherineParr

    KatherineParr Comrade

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    That.

    I don't expect a teacher to be Einstein. But I'd like them to be models of the informed adult.
     
  7. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    Well said, Katherine and Alice!
     
  8. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    No Alice, I'm not saying a smart person is DETRIMENTAL to teaching. You totally twisted my words there- I did not even say anything close to that! I said that it is often difficult for really book smart people to be good teachers. That doesn't mean they can't be a teacher or that there aren't off-the-charts smart people out there right now that are great teachers. However, I will still argue that it is harder for someone who is just naturally incredibly book smart to be a good teacher. They don't understand how people learn things, because they just "get it" right away themselves. They don't understand what it's like to actually study hard and they don't understand what kids need to do to actually learn something. It has nothing to do with "loving kids" (although I'd argue that someone that doesn't love kids has no business teaching no matter what other qualities they have), it has to do with understanding how learning works and how to teach. There's a HUGE difference between simply having a lot of knowledge and getting a really high score on an SAT test. I consider myself to be a "smart" person. I took all AP classes in high school, graduated in the top 10 of my class (even though at my school GPA was not weighted, so I was competing against people taking much easier classes), and I graduated magna cum laude in college as well. There is absolutely no doubt in my mind that I have enough knowledge to be a good, "smart" teacher. As I mentioned, I didn't even take the SAT so I don't know or care what math is on it- even if I had gotten a 400 on that section there would still be no doubt in my mind that I am certainly intelligent enough to be a teacher. Sure, if a teacher isn't "smart" enough to know her content really well as well as what students will need to know in the next level, we have a problem. However, I don't think any "book smarts" beyond that are relevant at all. There are SO many things that a teacher must be good at to be a good teacher- having incredibly high book smarts or testing skills is not one of them. I wasn't implying the SAT tests calculus, I was pointing out that it is ridiculous for us to think that an elementary teacher who isn't incredibly book smart isn't a good teacher, or to even think that being smarter than most people is a necessary quality for teachers. Some of the most teachable moments in my class have come when a student asks me something about another topic, and I have to say, "you know, I'm not really sure about that, but let's look it up together." I would say hands down my students got more out of that experience than me simply spitting out the information for them because I'm so smart I remember everything I learned in school. All they would have gotten out of that experience is realizing that their teacher is smart. I think that it is sad that in education we try so hard not to teach to the test and we know that the test does not tell us who is smart and who isn't, yet we turn around and try to use that backwards logic for teachers!
     
  9. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    To take a quote from Alice's post:
    I don't think anyone is saying teachers have to necessarily perform well on the SAT or be 'incredibly intelligent' or 'brilliant.' I think people are saying that we should expect teachers to have a high understanding/knowledge base, regardless of how they achieved it (natural intelligence vs. hard work/studying).
     
  10. KatherineParr

    KatherineParr Comrade

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    I think this was the point that implied, to me, that brains were a detriment to teaching. And it's not in any way offensive to me, I just disagree.

    First, because the people I know who are extremely successful in school and on tests *do* work enormously hard. They don't just skim along on their natural talents. So they have a great sense of what it takes to learn. They also model the relationship between effort and outcome.

    Second, because I think that people who have a natural facility for learning are often smart *about* learning. They can read and digest the educational research, they can flex their approach to the material because they know it so well. They are also often perceptive, so they can observe a student struggling and try to imagine ways to help him or her.

    I see the logic in your point. If smart people were merely talented then there would be no value in recruiting them to teach. But the smart people I know, including my students, are great examples of a variety of approaches to absorbing, organizing, studying, and mastering material.
     
  11. yarnwoman

    yarnwoman Cohort

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    I did not take the SAT's! The college I attended allowed you in the 80's to get in with your PSAT scores.
     
  12. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    waterfall, I can see your point, but I don't think you can generalize it so much.

    Personally, I've always done very well in school, so I guess I would be considered "book smart." I am much stronger in verbal skills/language arts/english than I am in quantitative skills/math - but I still do very well in math. It just takes me more work to get to that point; it doesn't come as naturally to me as verbal skills do.

    When I student taught in 6th grade, I loved teaching Language Arts. I loved dissecting text with kids, diving into reading comprehension strategies, and teaching them new vocabulary. The subject does come more naturally to me, but I feel I can still teach it well. Because I am confident in the subject matter, I can explain it in many different ways, and I am very excited and passionate about teaching it.

    My biggest surprise during student teaching was how much I also loved teaching sixth grade math. I was a little apprehensive at the beginning of the year, because although I knew I could do sixth grade math, I wasn't sure how well I would be able to teach it. To my surprise, it came quite naturally for me. I was able to explain things in several different ways, and I was also able to understand when students had difficulty grasping the concepts. I guess I am good at math, but it is still not my strongest subject, and as waterfall said, I think that actually did help me break down the concepts and relate to my struggling math students a little bit better.

    In other words, I really think it can go both ways. People who are very natural at a particular subject can still have the ability to break it down well, and people who may need to work harder at a particular subject may be able to break it down well because of their experiences with the subject.

    That said, I strongly agree with what Alice and others have said. Teachers should have a strong base of knowledge. That doesn't mean it all comes naturally to you and you know it already, but you should work to gain as much of a knowledge base as you can.

    I usually look at things from the elementary school viewpoint, but when I think about secondary teachers, I certainly hope they have an excellent knowledge base in their subject!! :D

    But waterfall, I definitely agree that there is still room for the "I am not sure about that, let's look it up together!" response - I actually love that response. We can never know all there is to know, and learning alongside our students can be an extremely valuable experience. :)
     
  13. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    It's on the high end of average. This would probably include people who majored in their content areas, which is different from including only people who major in education.
     
  14. Bioguru

    Bioguru Companion

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    I had a composite 32 on the ACT. I never took the SAT.
     
  15. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Virtuoso

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    I never had to take the SAT for any reason. At the time I was taking the ACT, I was only concerned that I could get over a 21, since that was the minimum requirement to get into the "uppity" private college I was the most interested in attending. I took the test once, and got enough to apply to the college. The funny thing is that I didn't end up going there, although I was accepted.
     
  16. bros

    bros Phenom

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    I got...

    530 verbal
    420 math
    480 writing

    with accommodations, but they refused to provide extended time
     
  17. TechnoMage

    TechnoMage Companion

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    Not that it really matters......

    My SAT scores got me into trouble in college.

    I should have been in remedial classes for english and math.

    Having been a high school drop-out and all.

    Instead, being the great test taker I am, an 1100 in '78 was considered high. I was placed in pre-cal and english for majors.
    Need I say, flunked out my first term, second term, first year....

    Changed schools and took those remedial classes I needed....

    Deans list after that. But my GPA never recovered.

    So much for tests indicating success......

    TechnoMage:2cents:
     
  18. Chrissteeena

    Chrissteeena Companion

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    I never took the ACT. I took the SAT five times- none of my scores were higher than 1000 and I honestly can't remember what they were.
     
  19. pete2770

    pete2770 Comrade

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    I know the feeling Bros. Worst for me is reading passages and answering questions in time limits because I have nystagmus. I basically end up reading the same lines a few times, so I'm at a major disadvantage during timed reading exams.
     
  20. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    I had no reason to take the SAT's (I wasn't going to attend an Ivy League school!).

    I took the ACT's in 1999 and I received a score of 22.
     
  21. Marci07

    Marci07 Devotee

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    My ACT score was composite of 21. I took the ACT after being in the US for 2 years so my English score was 18 because my English wasn't that good back then. Math was 25 in spite of skipping the entire year of geometry due to scheduling conflicts because of language issues.

    I'm not that happy with this score but considering the circumstances I understand the results. Other than that I got very good grades in all my classes in college.
     
  22. bros

    bros Phenom

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    I have latent nystagmus :p
     
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