What to do during lockdown practice

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by TeacherGrl7, Mar 8, 2009.

  1. TeacherGrl7

    TeacherGrl7 Devotee

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    My school will be having a lockdown practice in a few weeks. For an unlimited amount of time (15 minutes minimum), we will be in our rooms, huddled in a corner with a locked door and drawn shades. The children must be quiet throughout the duration of the lockdown. Throughout the lockdown, the administration will be trying to "trick us" by doing things such as calling our rooms, knocking on doors, pulling the fire alarm, etc.

    I have the youngest children in the school (18 4 year olds) and I anticipate that this will be very scary for my little ones. I am looking for anyone with experience with this to give me ideas of what to do with them. Good books to read, ideas of things to do to keep them quiet and relax them while all these noises are going on that they have to ignore. Ideas??
     
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  3. teacherpippi

    teacherpippi Habitué

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    Oh wow. That seems like a LONG amount of time with quite scary things for kids that young! Can you let kids know why you are practicing (to make sure everyone is safe in case a bad person comes in the building)?

    Do you have something in place in case a child needs to go to the bathroom?

    I would say lots of quiet songs, telling stories and reassurance that they are doing this to stay safe.

    Also, I am assuming that a parent letter has already gone home or will go home?
     
  4. TeacherGrl7

    TeacherGrl7 Devotee

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    We will have a short discussion with the children beforehand about why we need to do the drill. Our principal has given out a sheet instructing us in what we can tell them, with some suggestions.

    Our bathroom, thankfully, is right in our classroom, and it happens to be along the wall that we have to sit by, so that is helpful.

    Nothing has been said yet about whether the parents will be getting a notification about this prior to it happening. I plan on asking tomorrow, but I am not sure that I will be able to give prior warning unless the district does itself.
     
  5. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    This is supposed to happen to us this week and I think it is being poorly managed. First of all, we are a deaf school without a proper alerting system. The secretary coming to our rooms to tell us we are in a lockdown doesn't prepare us for anything. If anything were to happen, there really would be no way to alert us correctly so what is the point of doing this exercise? In our new building we will possibly have an alerting LED system and it makes more sense to wait and practice it there. As it is I found out from a teacher that they know the secretary will come and tell them but that's about it. Otherwise we all just got an email stating that it will happen sometime in the next week. No one has said anything to the children and if that teacher hadn't have said anything, I wouldn't have known even that (aide).
     
  6. TeacherGrl7

    TeacherGrl7 Devotee

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    Wow, cutNglue, that is crazy! In a lockdown situation, I can't imagine having someone walking the halls to alert everyone is a safe practice! Hopefully in your new building they will be properly equipped for things like that.

    As much as this is a pain, and very scary for the children and stressful for us as teachers, they are a necessary evil. Every school should be practicing for things like this, as far as I am concerned. I hope your drill goes okay this week!!
     
  7. sevenplus

    sevenplus Connoisseur

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    I have to say that the "tricking" part just sounds wrong. What kind of message are they sending to the little ones to pull a fire alarm? They have been taught to LEAVE the building immediately, and now you are going to say "stay put?" I understand the importance of being safe in that kind of situation, but fully inform teachers of the procedures then do a very brief (couple of minutes) practice with the students so they know where to go and to say quiet, and then move on.

    We've had a couple of real lockdowns in our school. One was more than an hour long. I had a class full of kindergartners huddled in our coatroom while a police incident (guns drawn hunting for a fugitive who was NOT in our building but in some apartments adjacent to the school) occurred right outside our classroom windows. Fortunately, no one in my room had to go to the bathroom, but a 2nd-grader did end up peeing in a trash can in her room. I ended up letting the students lie down best they could. It was really crowded and they were kind of overlapping each other but they managed well. I did play a book on tape at one point on a very low volume. It was a great story for visualizing as they sat/lay there in the dark. A few of them ended up falling asleep eventually.

    I also spent a long time in a bathroom when I taught pre-K. There was a bad storm and the tornado sirens were going off. That was easier in one way because we didn't have to be quiet, but harder because they knew there was a bad storm and some were really scared.
     
  8. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    I'm not against having a drill. I just think this is a false one. If we can't create a better system than having someone individually go to each and every room then there really isn't a point to the lockdowns. A lockdown is supposed to practice a safe procedure. So in effect we may end up scaring the kids, who haven't been notified, with a badly executed plan. At best the kids won't see the word lockdown and never know the difference. At worse, the staff who hasn't even been prepped will scare them because they won't have said something appropriate for the situation. Either way, we won't be practicing a real lockdown because in reality if someone bad entered the building, we're all in trouble if we have to wait for a single person to come tell us one by one. I'm against doing it just to satisfy some mandate. If we are going to do it, get serious about it and do it right.
     
  9. TeacherGrl7

    TeacherGrl7 Devotee

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    From a teacher standpoint, I completely agree. The children need to know (1) where to go, (2) to sit quietly, and (3) to listen to my directions above anything else that they hear. I can practice and discuss all of these without an official drill. We can practice the tricks before school with a 15 minute staff lockdown in which they call the rooms, pull the alarms, and make sure we all know to ignore everything.

    Looking at it from a security standpoint, however, I see why they feel that we need to go start to finish, as if it really was happening. If an intruder comes in, they WILL pull the fire alarm in the hopes that they will get someone to leave their room and be put in a vulnerable situation. And the only way to fully prepare for that is to have the teachers deal with it in reality- keeping children quiet, making sure everyone is where they need to be, and keeping our heads straight through all of the child chaos to still remember to ignore everything except the official "lockdown is over" announcement.

    Whether I agree with it or not, it is what it is and it's my job to make it as painless as possible for my kids.


    PS- Cut, I didn't mean to imply that you were against the practicing, I apologize if I was not clear! I just meant to make a generalized statement, not at all aimed at you. :)
     
  10. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    I wasn't insulted. :) I just used to to further drive my point home (hopefully). Do it right or what's the point.
     
  11. sevenplus

    sevenplus Connoisseur

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    Do they make that announcement over the PA? Because who is to say that the intruder isn't standing there with a gun to the secretary's head telling her to make the announcement?

    I agree that it is important to practice (and I'm not arguing with you at all). I just think that we need to limit what to subject students to. This is preschool! There is no need to practice all possible scenarios.

    Fire drill. Lockdown drill. Tornado drill. Shelter in place. Reverse evacuation. The list goes on and on - at least in my district. What is MOST important in an emergency is that the children know that they need to be quiet and listen carefully to any directions a teacher gives. Fire alarm = GET OUT. Pulling a fire alarm for any other situation and telling the children to stay in the building is flat-out confusing.

    But, you're right. It is what it is. Sometimes the decisions made by administration make me go :dizzy: though.
     
  12. jennyd

    jennyd Companion

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    Mar 8, 2009

    We've just recently started practicing the same sorts of things...unfortunate that there's a need to practice them at all, but such is life.

    Anyway, as stressful as the practice is, my principal has pointed out it's good for them to practice when there's no real danger and you can explain things, so if you should ever really need to lock down, the kids won't be as scared because they've gone through the steps before. Just like fire drills aren't really a big deal for most kids because we practice them so much.

    In the younger grades instead of saying we were practicing for an intruder (we didn't want to give them nightmares!) we used the scenario of a dog or other animal getting into the school. It made sense to them that they'd have to shut the doors so the dog couldn't get in, and be quiet so the dog wouldn't be distracted and could listen to whomever was trying to help it get out of the building.

    Hope that helps!
     
  13. Miss J. Pre-K

    Miss J. Pre-K Comrade

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    When I worked in an infant-toddler classroom, we had to climb stairs up into a narrow booth for our drills. We took every bucket of toys we could while corraling kids. We called it a "bear hunt" drill because we told the kids there was a bear loose, and they were familiar with the song "Going on a Bear Hunt". It's a scary thing to consider, but I'm glad we did it, because we did have to go into real lockdown a few weeks later. (It turned out to be a false alarm, but those are two hours I never want to repeat.)
     
  14. A_Pre-K_Teacher

    A_Pre-K_Teacher Rookie

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    "Hide-n-seek"

    When we do lock down drills I tell my students that it's to protect us against strangers that come to the school, a stranger that the principal doesn't know. I tell them we need to play hide-n-seek while we wait for the principal to tell us it's okay for this person to be at school. The thought of playing hide-n-seek and wanting to be super quiet always helps my students sit quietly longer than you would think.
     
  15. TeacherGrl7

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    They do make the announcement over the PA, but there is a catch. There is one very specific announcement to be made, and that is the only wording that can end the lockdown. If there IS an intruder with a gun to her head, she will say a similar phrase, but NOT our actual direction to end the lockdown. This is something else that I assume they will be testing in the practice drill- that we listen for the exact lockdown release, and not a variation on it.


    I should point out, this is not only a preschool building. I am in an elementary school that houses Pre-K to fifth grade. The lockdown is for the entire building, I just happen to have the littlest ones.
     
  16. TeacherGrl7

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    I like the ideas of telling them it could be a dog in the building, and the hide and seek. I might use one of those to help explain it to them. Thanks!
     
  17. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    My preschool had many "real" lockdowns due to being on the bike path and next to a public park. The children were afraid, no matter what we did to prepare them.
     
  18. Maxadoodle

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    Boy, all this makes me worried about my preschool. We are in an older church building without means to communicate with others in the building. The doors to our rooms are always locked, but since the church is open to all, we would never know if someone had a gun or not.
     
  19. McKennaL

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    I like the idea of a book on tape. For 2nd grade up... maybe have puzzle/word search/etc packets in that corner for that reason only... and for the older kids. packs of playing cards for playing games you have already taught.

    How TIGHT is this huddle? I am a little clostrophobic... and never been in a situation like this.
     
  20. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    I tried to put my 2 cents in yesterday, but the net went down on my end...

    When I subbed in a K room as Title , the 1, reg teacher took them past the book shelf in their room (before hand the kids were instructed to take 1 book, didn't matter which one, but take 1). They all proceeded to the back & grabbed their book I was pretty amazed at how quick & quiet they were. They all sat looking at their books & when they were done they exchanged with someone next to them quietly... This was done without much noise.

    Not that this is a funny situation...very serious... I just giggled because here we are all walking in the dark to get to the "safe spot" & all their little shoes were lighting up different colors!!!

    When I did teach first we did talk about it first, we practiced what had to be done for a couple of days before the drill, so we all knew our roles. Meaning I had a cart on wheels & the children next to it grabbed that as they went to our "safe spot" as I closed blinds & doors then adjusted the cart. It's hard to have that safe spot when you're exposed with windows & then have to think about the door with the window in it as well. Also planning on how to put your desks so you can have your "safe spot."

    I wish you luck... let us know how it goes.
     
  21. Prekfreak

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    Lockdown drills and the real thing happen semi frequently where we are at as well. We have never actually had to do the "hide" part of the drill, just lock the doors.
    I tell my kids that sometimes there are bad people in this world and that if for some reason they are being mean that we need to hide from them. We hide under the tables, lights out and blinds closed. This was in my old building. My new building is a little different but would virtually be the same thing but we don't have windows and we would probably go down in the basement in a serious situation.
     
  22. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    They told us today that we just pull the shades down, lock the doors and go on teaching.
     
  23. sevenplus

    sevenplus Connoisseur

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    That would be a Level 2 lockdown for us. Level 3 is when we hide within the classroom with doors and windows locked.
     
  24. TeacherGrl7

    TeacherGrl7 Devotee

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    Hmm I am going to have to measure my space tomorrow to see how close we really will be. The rule is that you must be against the same wall as the door so that you cannot be seen through the window. Unfortunately, it's not as if we have blank clear walls that we can stretch out against. There is a big shelving unit right next to my door that is about 5 feet across the wall, and too heavy to move, followed by 2 tables with our computer on top of them which jut out about 3 feet from the wall, and our bathroom is on the same wall as the door so THAT takes up the last several feet.

    My assistant and I have accumulated enough small carpet mats between the two of us so that the children can each grab one to sit on (our real carpet is right in the view of the doorway). They are used to this because I keep several in the room for the listening center. I will basically be putting them down as close to each other as they can be and hoping for the best- 18 little bodies and 2 big bodies. I have faith in them that they can sit quietly and nicely and listen to my directions, thank goodness none of that is a concern of mine. I am only concerned about them being scared and crying- I only have 1 lap!

    I would like to find a very soothing book to either read to them myself, or put in the CD player. Unfortunately their favorite kinds of books are funny books, and I don't think that will work out so well! LoL I did think that maybe a few bedtime stories would work too (hey, if they fall asleep, all the better for me). I just need to find one.
     
  25. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Okay, we had our lockdown today. I just happened to be on the bottom floor in the office. Here I am thinking that if it were a true lockdown, just like with the firedrill, you go with the escape (or in this case a containment) in the area you are currently in. Nope. I was told to go upstairs and go back to my class.

    Then the secretary put on a bright orange safety vest an went to tell everyone that it was a lockdown. I had already done our room. I didn't have a key. Good thing I wasn't subbing that day.

    Then I had a hilarious thought. How are they supposed to tell us it is over (we can't hear). Umm...the secretary had to go get the master key and unlock every single room.
     
  26. SwOcean Gal

    SwOcean Gal Devotee

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    in my preschool we have a bag with all sorts of materials in it. Most useful to have at hand are those wiki sticks at least 2 for each student then you can challenge them to make letters etc quietly! It worked wonders for our 3-4s in addition to a new book the kids never heard before- it was Eric Carles slowly went the sloth or something like that. we also have snack bars and I think some juice boxes. That was all we needed for the 20 minutes although we wished we had more books! But the wiki sticks kept the kids occupied. We did take them away after the drill though so it would be novel in case we needed to do it again. However, we did keep the book out in the library and put a different set of books in our bag. Good luck! Mats are a must! makes it much easier! good luck!
     
  27. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    Your lockdown practice doesn't sound like a real lock down. If it were you don't go back out into a hallway. You go into the closest room and lock the door.
     
  28. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    One of my programs was in a church. It, too, was open to the public. For security, we installed locks on the outer door, and on the door to the center. People had to ring and state who they were, and we buzzed them in. Otherwise, we had unwelcome visitors.
     
  29. TeacherGrl7

    TeacherGrl7 Devotee

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    Wow, Cut, it hardly seems worth it to have done that practice! Hope it goes much smoother and safer in your new building!

    I like the wiki stick idea! I have some, and I have been waiting to use them as a reward or something special. This might be just the thing!
     
  30. sarzacsmom

    sarzacsmom Groupie

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    my concern with plaing a tape player or what eve quietly is that you would have to have it close enough to you that you can all hear it and if the bad guy happens to hear it he'll have a good idea of yoru location in the room. I'm heading our disaster plan committee and my recommendation for the windows in the doors is black cloth that is velcroed over the top of the window and rolls up and attaches with another strip of velcro so that in a lockdown we can simply undo the second velcro piece and let it fall down over the window and ahve another piece of velcro to stick the bottom to. I'm also recommending that we replace all our shades with total ligth blocking ones and have velcro strips on the sides so they will stay tight to the trim.
     
  31. sevenplus

    sevenplus Connoisseur

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    I hear what you are saying, but I think it completely depends on the situation. When we had one of our real lockdowns, there was no "bad guy" trying to find people in our school building. The police had guns drawn outside our building searching for someone in an adjacent apartment building. We didn't have to be completely quiet, just in a safe location and all accounted for. They did evacuate the classrooms next to mine since they were closest to the action, but we just had to stay put. It lasted more than an hour and I did use a book on tape and it really helped.


    I do not use a tape player or an other kind of entertainment/distraction during our drills, because they are typically less than 10 minutes and I expect my students to be able to sit quietly for that long, especially in an emergency situation.
     
  32. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    All of the real lockdowns we've been in have been of this type. Yes, there were police...LOTS of police...with guns drawn, but the cause was something happening in the neighborhood. We were all confined to our classrooms, but the kids could talk and make noise.

    Of course, there IS reason to know about the other type of lockdown, but chances are, if you have any kind of lockdown it will be of the other type.
     
  33. TeacherGrl7

    TeacherGrl7 Devotee

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    I really wish that we had this. I have been in districts before where they had a curtain hanging over the door window that could be dropped down in an emergency. It is so cheap to do, I don't see why anyone would not! It is so much easier than cramming your class into a small square of the classroom.
     
  34. GlendaLL

    GlendaLL Aficionado

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    Talk about cheap - there's one high school that I go to that has classroom doors with long narrow windows. All of the teachers keep a rolled up piece of paper attached to the top of the window. Then the teachers use a paper clip to keep it rolled up. When they have a lockdown, all they have to do is release the paper clip. The paper unrolls and covers the window.
     
  35. puff5655

    puff5655 Cohort

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    This subject came up on another listserv. One teacher calls it a "skunk drill" and explains to the children that they are practicing for what they would do if a skunk got into the building.. which makes it much less scary for them.

    I don't think there's any reason to tell them what it's REALLY for. You don't want kids who are scared to come to school because of what could happen there.
     
  36. sarzacsmom

    sarzacsmom Groupie

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    My concern with the paper is that if it stays rolled up for a long time it will curl on the bottom when released and may not completley cover the window allowing for an intruder to still peek in. I am approaching all of these scenerios as real events and try to find the flaws so I don't have to look back after the fact and say if only we had done this different everyone would still be okay---- i think as the head of the disaster/emergency plan that is how I need to be thinking.
     
  37. GlendaLL

    GlendaLL Aficionado

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    Just make the paper roll longer than the window.
     
  38. sarzacsmom

    sarzacsmom Groupie

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    I'm still going with the fabric--that way I don't have to worry about it getting ripped or rolling or anything.drop it down and velcro it and be done with it. I'm more concerned with some the classroom doors that have split doors (top and bottom). I have a window sash lock on mine becaue soemtiems I wnat both halves closed at the same time, but others don't. I am recommending dead bolt type locks on them--- so they can't jsut be pushed open easily. Even my window sash lock won't hold a strong push i don't think, as the screw aren't long enough.

    My other main concerns are no communication available between classrooms and no communication with the play ground. I was wondering if anyone has heard of a system of lights that could be installed in each classroom and they would flash red, or green or something like that.
     
  39. BASAM

    BASAM Comrade

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    We have Level 1-just doors that lead outisde the building are locked business inside the schools goes on like normal

    Level 2-Classroom doors are locked business inside the class goes on like usual, no in and out of classroom

    Level 3-Lock classroom door, huddle in corner away from camera, lights off, voices off, door window covered (we have to keep a piece of paper'cloth ready to go in our emergency bin, which is near the door) , blinds completely open (on 2nd floor and in extreme case if swat needed to see in they could)

    We had a real Level 3 a few weeks ago and the kids did great. We drill several times a year, so to them it is routine.
     
  40. SpaceAngel

    SpaceAngel Comrade

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    We just did a lockdown drill at the daycare/preschool where I work. In our room, we tell the kids that we need to practice, just like a fire drill, in case someone the directors (we use their names, of course) doesnt know tries to come into our school. Our rooms mostly join to one another, and don't lock, but bathroom doors do in most rooms, and in our room we have two big locking closets as well. So, we just have our group's assigned spot, go in, lock the doors (sometimes they have us turn out the lights so none can be seen under the crack). We tell hte kids we need to be very quiet so Miss Sue can't find us. They actually think it is kind of fun.

    We never really had a real lockdown. Once last summer, there was an instance of a bank nearby being robbed and helicopters being used to find the suspect. My group was on the playground, when I noticed the copters I took them in and let the office know somehting was going on. When they determined what it was, no groups could leave their homebase, and office staff manned all doors until we got the all clear from the police. It was pretty low key, the kids didn't even know something was going on. We sat at the carpet and read stories.
     

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