What size is your facility?

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by sarzacsmom, Sep 13, 2008.

  1. sarzacsmom

    sarzacsmom Groupie

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    Sep 13, 2008

    I've been on this forum for a while now and it seems like most everyone is either in a public school type setting with very large classes or a very small private setting---- I could be totally wrong---I am just curious to what the size and set up of the various facilities represented here are---

    the center I work at is based out of a church, but except for Bible story twice a week we do not follow a "christian" curriculum (we don''t do halloween or Santa though). We are licensed for a total of 101 children ages 6 weeks to 12 years, though we average around 65 or so children most of the time (some years we have a very large summer camp program for school age children which brings the numbers up closer to 100). The classrooms are broken down to infants, 3 toddler rooms ( divided by ages) 2 preschool rooms ( 3s and 4s) pre K and Kindergarten. We have 18 staff counting the director, 14 of us are qualified as lead teachers and 4 as assistant teachers---they are the floaters and cover lucnhes as well. Our ratios are according to state guidelines and are : infants 1:4, toddler one 1:5, toddler two 1;5, toddler 3 1:6. preschool 3s 1:8, preschool 4s 1:9, prek 1:10 and kindergarten 1 :15 We currently have around 65 children enrolled. We are open 6am to 6pm but have a 10 hour rule.
     
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  3. K3 teacher

    K3 teacher Companion

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    Sep 13, 2008

    I am in a public school system.

    Our PreK program consits of 4 1/2 sessions of K3 with up to 15 kiddos in each session. 2 1/2 sessions of K4 with up to 18 kids. One full day K4 session - 18 kids. We can have 150 3 and 4 year olds in our program. This year we have about 145.

    We also have 2 1/2 day Head Start sessions, 2 Intermeidate Unit preschool classrooms - 3 1/2 day sessions, and a YMCA program for 8 toddlers, over 30 preschoolers (when they are not in K3 or K4) and after school care through 4th grade.

    Not including the Y staff, we have 8 teachers and 12 paras. We have an Early Childhood Coordinator, a Principal and and Dean of Students. We are all in our own hallway. The rest of the school has 6-7 classrooms of each grade level K-4th.


    So, I guess I come from a fairly large facility. I am curious, though, to what the situtations are else where.
     
  4. MsWK

    MsWK Habitué

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    Sep 13, 2008

    We've got about 150 kids infants-K.

    2 infant rooms: 8 infants each, 2 (sometimes 3) teachers in each room
    2 toddler rooms: 9 toddlers each, 3 teachers in each room
    2 twos rooms: 12 twos each, 3 teachers in each room
    2 threes rooms, 2 fours rooms: 12 children in each room, 2 teachers in each room
    1 K with 20 children and 2 teachers
     
  5. LA-4

    LA-4 Rookie

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    Sep 13, 2008

    Public School for me

    I teach public school pre-k. We have 5 classes with 20 students in each class at my school. Each class has a teacher and a para giving us a 1:10 ratio. My name is actually the name of the funding for our public school pre-k, LA-4. Most of our public school pre-k's are funded through this grant although we do have some classes funded through title I and other programs.
     
  6. Maxadoodle

    Maxadoodle Comrade

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    My preschool is in a church, but we do not teach a Christian curriculum either. We do Halloween and Santa. The Sunday School uses our rooms, which is OK as long as everything is put away again. We have two 2-1/2's (M & F); five 3's (T-W-R); five 4's (M-T-W-R); and one 4's (M-T-W-R-F). Each classroom has one teacher and one assistant. And I must say, I think my assistant is the best in the world!
     
  7. sarzacsmom

    sarzacsmom Groupie

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    Sep 13, 2008

    I should have added that our facility is full time only-- all of our kids are enrolled for full days five days a week. The only exception is our summer camp and school vacation programs for the school agers. We also offer before school, after school and both but it is for five days a week. Many of our familes recevie tuition assistance in the formof title 20, but we are a non-profit self supporting center --we do apply for grants when we can find them and do accept donations as well as doing fund raisers
     
  8. vbubbles1874

    vbubbles1874 Companion

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    Sep 13, 2008

    We are licensed for 152: 6 weeks - 12 years. There are about 14 full-time teachers & 4 part-time (pm staff).
    2:10 infants
    2:11 creepers
    2:13 toddlers
    2:15 2's
    1:15 3's
    1:18 4's
    2:30 PreK (my class-we only have 24)
    1:14 Private K (only 11 enrolled)

    Most of our classes are full, and we do need some more afternoon staff. Alot of us leave at 2:30, so there is alot of moving kids around in the pm. We had a couple of girls come in for orientation and then not show up for work. One girl worked one day, called in and then no showed for 2 days. We still don't know what happened to her.
     
  9. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    Sep 13, 2008

    Our school is preschool - grade 6 with about 150 students.

    We have:

    2 half day 3/4 classes (preschool)
    2 half day 4/5 classes (pre k)
    2 K classes (elementary)
    1 1/2 class
    1 2/3 class
    1 3/4 class
    1 5/6 class

    Our ratio for the 3/4 is 10:1
    for other preschool classes and K is 13:1
    for first and up 16:1

    Right now we are short 2 classrooms!!! We have combo classes right now, but we have enough rooms that we could have a 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 in the elementary building. We have always traditionally done multi-age though. Two rooms are empty right now!!!!!
     
  10. sarzacsmom

    sarzacsmom Groupie

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    Wow -- an infant ration of 2 teachers to 10 infants-- and 15 two year olds to one teacher! Does that mean 1 adult to 10 infants and one adult to every 15 2 year olds or is that jsut how many teachers and then you have aids also--- if that is total adults to children ratios that seems way high to me--- liek i said our state regualtions only allow a total of 4 infants to 1 adult!
     
  11. vbubbles1874

    vbubbles1874 Companion

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    Sep 14, 2008

    Texas state ratios
    1 teacher to 5 infants with a max group size of 10 and 2 teachers.
    Texas is ranked 48th out of 50 when it comes to childcare licensing. They have the worst state ratios I have ever seen. 1 teacher to 18 4 year olds with a max group size of 35 to 2 teachers. Could you imagine 35 4-5 year olds in 1 room?
     
  12. sarzacsmom

    sarzacsmom Groupie

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    Sep 14, 2008

    I am quickly learning that NH is prety tight with the regs for child care licensing---and my director is even more so--- like the state regs require that there be at least one cpr and first aid certified staff memeber on duty at all times. My director requires that every member of her staff be Infant, child and adult certified in CPR, First Aid and Water Safety. They are paid trainings for us and are renewed as a group every two years. OUr field trip ratios are smaller than our classroom ratios. My classroom ratio is 1 :8 but my field trip ratio is 1:6. but I'm not complaining-- I think it's a good thing for the most part. There are a few stupid rules but more good than bad. The new one that kind of bugs us is that the children can't wipe down their own sleeping mats. We used to spray them down with the bleach and water solution and the children would get the paper towels and dry them off (the state and the poison control center have both stated that the bleach and water solution is LESS concentrated than swimming pool water), and even though Chlorox Anywhere solution is okay for us to use and leave on the toys and everything else even the state approves of tha), we can't allow the children to wipe that off either. They can touch it with their hands but not with a paper towel! But mostly it's good things and you find a way to make it work.
     
  13. sarzacsmom

    sarzacsmom Groupie

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    Sep 14, 2008

    When I looked up the stte rankings I found that Nh is listed as 43rd-- which is not that great, it's inthe bottom 10--but when I looked through the criteria I found that two of the biggest reasons is that because we have a lot of rural area with low population density we have alot of home providers that are not licensed because they don't care for enough children to be required to by our state regs-- Ihave hard that that rule si changing, and I also saw that one of the criteria is to require 24 hours of training per year. NH has only required 6 and has only recently bumped it up to 12. They are increasing it a little each year or two to give centers and the trainers the opportunity to design training programs but the goal is to make it 24. My director has had to go to several meeting about the upcoming changes and has actually implemented many of them in our center already so that we will ahead of the regulations effective dates.
     
  14. forkids

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    Sep 14, 2008

    I am in a public school system. Our Pre-K classes from the whole county have been combined into a Pre-K center. We occupy one whole wing of a larger school building. We have 16 classes with 1 teacher/1 para/20 students, for a total of 320 Pre-K students/16 teachers/16 paras. We also have a site director and 3 Resource Coordinators. We follow the same operating schedule as the rest of the school system.
     
  15. PennStateCutie

    PennStateCutie Companion

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    Sep 14, 2008

    I am in a church-based system. We have two actual preschool classrooms/teachers (3s come 2 days a week, 4s come 3 days a week) and two daycare teachers (1 for the 3s and 1 for the 4s). Our daycare classes can have up to 10 where the preschool classes have never had more than 8, so we have at most 36 kids on any given day). We also do before & after-school daycare & there are about 25 kids enrolled in that program. Included in that is a half-day kindergarten program (daycare for kids in half-day kindergarten) with 8 kids, so that bumps us up to 40-some kids in the bldg in the morning, and a total of 75 kids total enrolled in any of the programs.
     
  16. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Speaking up for the tiny programs

    I am one of the tiny but powerful programs on the site. I have a BA and Masters level continuing ed credits in ECE along w/ the trainings like First Aid and CPR and so on. I am both the director, the lead teacher, and anyone else.

    We are inside the family home child care licensing realm-but we are what used to be called a mini center. We have 12 children at any one time, but my waitlist is 2 years long-so there are several people who opt to time share w/a school age child and attend only 8:30-3:30p. We usually see 15 children in our mixed age program each day.

    We must meet all licensing for centers at all times w/in our home program. Since NACCRRA's list of child care ranking show WA state as 2nd in the country I feel validated in saying that meeting these rules in a home is not an easy challange.

    We employ staff at all times, as I am also president of our local Association and I work on many national and state committees in the name of family child care. Our ratios of no more than 4 children: 1 staff person are the lowest in town.

    We serve, in our mixed age room, birth to 12, and we are mandated to meet the learning needs of each child at all times and at all stages. We have special needs children often after school and before kindergarten due to our lower ratios and we much also document how we are meeting needs in those instances. I serve as a feeder school for my local elmentary school and they really appreciate the children that enroll in their program after finishing here.

    In WA state this is not an easy place to be-family care. But we couldn't imagine teaching any other way than this now.

    We (my staff and fellow providers and myself) have tried to open a center in our area, but we couldn't imagine giving up the teaching of the family at one time. When you move to centers the mixed age time in our area is greatly reduced. We are still considering.

    I was very validated to see in NAEYC's journal this month there was an article on mixed age classes serving families all at one time.

    So I hope you can see we are small, but not less engaging. :up:
     
  17. teresaro

    teresaro Rookie

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    size of class

    I am in a parochial school that started a 4K program this year. I have 16 students and the other PreK teacher has 17. Neither of us has a full-time aide, but a work-study student comes in to help on Tues./Thurs. The preschool teacher has 7 Mon./Wed./Fri students and 7 Tues./thurs. students for 1/2 day. The PreK has 11 full-day and 13 full-day, respectively.
     
  18. sarzacsmom

    sarzacsmom Groupie

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    I fully believe that having a variety of provider types is the key to providing for a community. Not all settings are approriate for all children and families. I applaud the teachers in the centers and the teachers in the home settings--- each comes withit's own unique set of challenges and rewards and communities could not thrive without all of them. Kudos to all of us!!
     
  19. tracer330

    tracer330 Rookie

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    Oct 1, 2008

    i work at a private child care center for children 6 weeks through 5 years; i'm not actually sure how many we are licensed for; and i'm not positive if all of the classrooms; but the ratios and number of classrooms are as follows:

    2 infant rooms, 6 infants each, 2 teachers in each room (1:3)

    2 toddler rooms, 6 todds each, 2 teachers in each room (1:3)

    three 2's rooms, two with 12 kids and two teachers, one with 6 kids and one teacher (1:6)

    one 3's room, two teachers with 20 kids (1:10)

    one preK prep room, two teachers with 20 kids (1:10)

    one preK room, two teachers with 20 kids (1:10)
     
  20. keep_smiling

    keep_smiling Rookie

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    Oct 2, 2008

    I work in a privite child care center. Licenced for 32 children. We have 5 staff members. I am the lead preschool teacher and I have a co-teacher that takes them for 2hrs. a day for phy ed, health and science activities. Our center is a converted 4 bedroom house with a small gym added on about 5 years ago. We have an infant rm., toddler rm., gym, and preschool rm.
     
  21. anna9868

    anna9868 Habitué

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    Oct 3, 2008

    I work at YMCA half a day preschool. I don't know the total number of children, but approximate numbers are:

    2 classes - Mommy&Me, 2d/wk
    6 - 2-3 year old (I teach one), 2d/wk or 3d/wk, ratio: 1-6
    4 - 3-4 year olds, 3d/wk or 5d/wk, ratio: 1-8
    2 - 4-5 year olds, 3d/wk or 5d/wk, ratio: ?

    What's interesting is that most of the classes are not full, like I have 4 out of 6 possible students. This place is about 30 min away from where I live. In my area, though, most preschool spots are taken by spring if not earlier!
     
  22. anna9868

    anna9868 Habitué

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    I heard that too when we lived in Houston. Another thing I was surprised about looking at preschools in Houston area was that so many of them called themselves Montessori. However, when I talked to them and looked at their facility, they had nothing from Montessori in them :(
     
  23. anna9868

    anna9868 Habitué

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    I'm just curious why would Head start or YMCA have sessions in public schools and not in their own facilities?

    Also, what is the purpose of Intermediate Unit? I know I worked for one here in PA when I was a sub. But I heard they many other things as well
     
  24. snorkelbum

    snorkelbum Rookie

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    Oct 3, 2008

    i'm in FL. i work in a year round program.. we have age 2 thru 5. and before and after school care... 7:00 till 6:00

    we have 86 in preschool and about 55 in after school care.....

    we have 11 kids in todds... 15 in 3&4's and 16 in prek.2 teachers in each room...(or 1 teacher & 1 asst.) it is in a church building but we don't do a religious curr..........
     
  25. Minnie Mouse

    Minnie Mouse Rookie

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    Title I funded public school pre-k program here. We have 4 pre-k classes at our school with a total school enrollment of about 750 kids in grades pre-k through 6.
     
  26. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Why weren't the Montessori? I was under the impression you couldn't call yourself that, if you weren't? How did these estabishments feel that they were meeting the criteria?
     
  27. anna9868

    anna9868 Habitué

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    Yea, I wondered about the same thing, only I I didn't ask. At that time I was looking at schools as a parent. And I didn't see what I knew about Montessori in those schools: they didn't have mixed age groups, and I didn't see them concentrate on life skills.
    Maybe they had something else from Montessori, who knows!
     
  28. vannapk

    vannapk Groupie

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    Oct 4, 2008

    I work for a large, urban school district in Dallas. Our pre-k program is Title 1 funded and our students must qualify for our free program based on language or income.

    We have 60 classes of full-day pre-k (7:50am - 3:10pm).

    There are no class size requirements for public pre-k in TX so we have some classes with 30 or more students, our smallest class has 17 students.

    We have pre-k classrooms on 13 different campuses, 2 of those are pre-k only campuses, all the others are on regular campuses.

    We have half-time assistants, so that means they are in each classroom for 2 hours and 45 minutes each day.
     

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