What should I do?

Discussion in 'General Education Archives' started by Jenny G, Apr 24, 2007.

  1. Jenny G

    Jenny G Companion

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    Apr 24, 2007

    **WARNING - LONG**

    There is a 5th grade student at school that regularly threatens to slap other students. We have a list a mile long of serious things that she has done that are against school rules and has received no punishment for them. We have a serious problem with our principal and discipline in that he does not enforce the rules. Yesterday, this student told the sub in her room to "Shut the F*#% up", refused again to participate in P.E. (after the principal telling me that if she refused again, she would be suspended; apparently he didn't tell her that), and conspired with two other students to steal things from a classroom. Today, when I told her to get out of the bathroom and get to detention, she walked in to detention and said, loudly enough for the entire room to hear, "If she doesn't shut up, I'm going to slap her." This was referring to me. I immediately told my principal and vice principal who asked her to come to the office. Principal talked to her. Her punishment? A letter of apology to me.

    What recourse can I take? My husband wants to beat up my principal now. We have had issues with this principal for a couple of years, but today was the first day that I thought I might not want to come back next year. What will it take for him to do something? Me to actually get slapped, because I don't think he wants the lawsuit should that happen.
     
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  3. Mamacita

    Mamacita Aficionado

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    Apr 24, 2007

    If this child DOES slap you, press charges. Call the police and press charges. And if your school won't call for you, do it yourself. Don't let this child get away with this behavior.

    Chances are, though, that she's all talk and no action, especially in a building with a sissy principal. In which case, just keep sending her to the office and demanding a timestamp if they send her back to you. Xerox a pile of office passes especially for this kid, so all you have to do is date, timestamp, and sign them. Keep a copy of each one.

    I do despise both bullies and wimps, whether they be a student or an adult in the building.
     
  4. samannie

    samannie New Member

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    Apr 24, 2007

    I agree that you should definitely press charges if you are harmed. One of my homeroom students threatened to kill a faculty member in front of witnesses. He was only talked to by the principal. I also had a student threaten to blow the school up, and he was talked to. I heard the threat myself and sent him to the office. I know most kids are probably just talk, but I believe that all threats should be taken very seriously.
     
  5. Jenny G

    Jenny G Companion

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    Apr 24, 2007

    Oh, believe me, should she actually follow through, I will be calling the police. I will also be suing the district, the principal and the girl's parents. I just wondered other ways to handle it.

    She is in the office DAILY about something she has done. Pretty bad things too. And she gets sent back after talking to the principal. Usually with no consequences. Or, she gets sent back because they are too busy in the office and there isn't anyone to talk to her right then.

    I should also add that this isn't one of my students, just in my grade level. I don't think she would be this bad if she was mine, she has no respect for her teacher and that adds to her bad behavior.
     
  6. saintdawg

    saintdawg Rookie

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    Apr 24, 2007

    Does this commonly occur with male principals? Have most abrogated their responsibilities as leaders, educators and, at the risk of being branded a sexist, men? Don't get me wrong, standards are standards and rules are rules and the sex of the enforcer shouldn't matter. My kids' principals have all been women and tough as nails in enforcing their rules. However, it is my belief that too many men for too long have not done their jobs and that is a primary cause of many of the ills of society. One of the formative lessons I received on this was reading "Raising Boys" written by an Australian whose name escapes me at the moment.

    Jenny, if I was your husband I would want to beat up your principal too. Can you go over his head? If his discipline is this lacking it has to show up in the performance numbers somewhere.

    Cheers
     
  7. stephenpe

    stephenpe Connoisseur

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    Apr 25, 2007

    I find that PARENTS can get things done when teachers have little power. If a few go over his head to the county office or school board then things might get rolling. Kids allowed to behave like that girl are poison to a class and even a school. Kids are smart enough to realize when the inmates are in charge.
     
  8. La Profesora

    La Profesora Cohort

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    Apr 25, 2007

    DO NOT EVER ALLOW TERRORISTIC THREATS! No child should be allowed to terrorize you!

    Report everything, with dates and times, keep good records, report it to your lawyer or your union, report it to the superintendent - don't let these kids run the school! That's crap, to have a principal who doesn't take violations of the Student Code of Conduct seriously.

    Suggest to the teachers that they have her removed from their classes. There is something in Texas (not sure if its national) called a "Section 37." This allows a teacher to remove a student from a class immediately and the student can't be returned unless there has been a review board look over the case and decide what is the best setting for the child. Check it out and see if you can work together to have a known "terror" removed.

    good Luck!
     
  9. saintdawg

    saintdawg Rookie

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    Apr 25, 2007

    La Profesora, one of the words that came to mind was "terrorist" but I wasn't sure if that would be appropriate. Your post is very powerful and direct. Thank you for the information on "Section 37." If I get a job one of the first things I will check on is a similar policy.

    Cheers
     
  10. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Apr 25, 2007

    Oh, My Gracious!

    The schools in my area have a ZERO tolerance policy toward violence of any kind. Fighting earns you an automatic suspension of some sort (ISS or sent home). Death threats and Threatening to blow up the school are considered terrorism, and are IMMEDIATELY handled by the police, regardless of the intent of the threat. Possession of a weapon on campus is also grounds for immediate expulsion -- we even had a kindergartener bring a gun for show and tell -- the poor kid didn't know any better, but he was expelled for the school year anyway.
     
  11. 4monthcountdown

    4monthcountdown Comrade

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    Apr 25, 2007

    This girl should not be allowed to remain in the classroom with this kind of behavior. I would definitely be going above the principal with this situation. When parents are sick and tired of being inconvenienced by the suspensions of their children, maybe they'll decide to take control in their homes.
     
  12. GardenDove

    GardenDove Habitué

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    Apr 25, 2007

    Threatening someone verbally like this is legally an assault. This is a crime.

    as·sault(-sôlt)
    n.
    1. A violent physical or verbal attack.
    2.
    a. A military attack, such as one launched against a fortified area or place.
    b. The concluding stage of an attack in which close combat occurs with the enemy.
    3. Law
    a. An unlawful threat or attempt to do bodily injury to another.
    b. The act or an instance of unlawfully threatening or attempting to injure another.

    4.
    a. Law Sexual assault.
    b. The crime of rape.
     
  13. jojo808

    jojo808 Comrade

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    Apr 25, 2007

    I have been in a similiar situation where one student is bullying and verbaly abusive. He was suspended a few times with no change in his behavior. I told students, to talk to their parents about school and about any one who is disrupting their learning. Parents have a lot of power. I would definitely go above the principal's head.
     

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