what should a mentor do??

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by nicole4, Aug 22, 2008.

  1. nicole4

    nicole4 Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2008
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 22, 2008

    This is my first year teaching. I was assigned a mentor at my school. I am teaching 2nd grade and she is a 6th grade teacher. This was our first week at school and I have not heard from her at all. I know the first week of school is hectic as it has been for me. However as a mentor shouldn't she have come by or at least sent me an email? Our classrooms are on opposite sides of the building so I never see her during the day. She was assigned to me back in July, and we had a luncheon at school for the new teachers and mentors. I was thinking she would have at least came to look at my classroom since this is my first year. I also know she is getting paid to be a mentor. What are your thoughts. Should I be reporting and contacting her? Am I wrong to feel upset that she hasn't not even stopped by to see me?:unsure:
     
  2.  
  3. frogger

    frogger Devotee

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2008
    Messages:
    1,057
    Likes Received:
    2

    Aug 22, 2008

    Yes the mentor should have made contact to you by now or several times. Maybe contact the lead mentor at your school and ask her in a nice way about the role of mentor with you and the mentor/mentee relationship.
     
  4. sophie1

    sophie1 Comrade

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2007
    Messages:
    424
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 22, 2008

    Yes, she should have at least stopped by and asked how you were doing and what can she do to help...
     
  5. inhisgrip20

    inhisgrip20 Comrade

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2007
    Messages:
    383
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 22, 2008

    My first year teaching I was assigned a mentor. He was basically there to answer any questions I had throughout the year... I barely spoke 5 words with him the whole year. You probably won't have much contact with yours either from the looks of it, especially since you guys are so far apart in location and grade levels (as was my mentor and I).

    I wouldn't stress about it too much. If you have any specific questions, contact her. I'm sure she would be happy to help. If anything I'd swing by her room just to say "hey" and while you're there ask what exactly a mentor teacher does (just in casual conversation, like you're really interested.) :)
     
  6. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2007
    Messages:
    1,160
    Likes Received:
    170

    Aug 22, 2008

    Too often mentors are chosen via the mirror-dart board approach to excellence in teaching. At one school I taught at the only "qualification" was ability to raise one's hand at a staff meeting.

    At another school mentors were required to attend training classes after school. These classes had to do with data collection during observations and conferencing techniques. Mentors and mentees took turns demo lessons and observing in classrooms. Pre and post conferences were part of weekly plan.
     
  7. Annie227

    Annie227 Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2007
    Messages:
    200
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 23, 2008

    You shouldn't have to track down your mentor if you have questions - they should be stopping by to check in regularly. Sometimes you can find someone closer to you that will help you (regardless of whether or not they get paid). I'd still recommend asking for a new mentor soon - don't wait until you're overwhelmed.
     
  8. Alisha

    Alisha Cohort

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2008
    Messages:
    525
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 23, 2008

    I agree with all that has been said. Your mentor should be coming to find you, checking in on you, and staying in contact with you. I'm also a first year teacher and am glad that my school has a set mentoring program. We are required to meet with our mentor for a total of an hour a week and half 1 hour new teacher meetings once a month.Check with the person in charge of setting up mentors in your district to see if there is some minimum contact that is expected. (whether there is or isn't I still think it is wrong that your mentor hasn't stopped by)
     
  9. frogger

    frogger Devotee

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2008
    Messages:
    1,057
    Likes Received:
    2

    Aug 23, 2008


    I agree with this!
     
  10. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2007
    Messages:
    2,233
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 23, 2008

    What a slacker! And getting paid for it? Maybe you're better off ignoring the person and picking out someone on your team or nearby to mentor you. Privately. Without anyone knowing. Even the person you picked.
     
  11. maroki

    maroki Comrade

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2006
    Messages:
    490
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 24, 2008

    I had a similar experience my first year teaching. I originally was supposed to teach a 1/2 split, and they assigned me a 2nd grade teacher as a mentor. She was wonderful, and I saw her quite often before school started (she would stop in my room to check on how I was doing). After I got switched to a straight 1st grade, they switched my mentor. She didn't seek me out much, and I felt much more comfortable going to my original mentor, so I kept (unofficially) going to her throughout the year, saving some non-discussion questions for my assigned mentor teacher. (Such as...Where and how do I turn in my conference forms? etc.)

    Your mentor should definitely be seeking you out. If they aren't, see how helpful they are when you approach them with questions. If they aren't helpful even then, try adopting an unofficial mentor to get you through the year. I don't know who oversees mentors at your school; at my school it is just the P, and I talked to him when they switched my mentor and she was less than helpful, and he basically told me to suck it up. I ended up coping by going to my unofficial mentor the rest of the year.
     
  12. 1stGr8

    1stGr8 Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2007
    Messages:
    119
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 24, 2008

    Hmm... at my school they try to assign you a mentor within the same grade. Are there other teachers that teach 2nd? If so, I would become very friendly with them. They are going to be the people to answer most of your questions in regards to curriculum, etc. Also, try reaching out to your mentor and see how he/she responds. My mentor NEVER came to see me, I always had to go see her. I think it is wrong for your mentor to not be proactive (especially since in my district I had to PAY my mentor out of my salary) but see how they respond when you approach them. If it still isn't working out, really reach out to your grade level.
     
  13. cmorris

    cmorris Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2005
    Messages:
    356
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 24, 2008

    :eek::eek::down:
     
  14. lysithea88

    lysithea88 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2008
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 24, 2008

    My mentor has been great! Before I even made it into school the first time, she had already emailed me to introduce herself and ask if I had any questions. She also set up a lunch with the two of us, as well as a few others that she thought it be helpful that I meet right away.

    The school specifically assigned me a mentor that was not on my team. As you probably know, problems can sometimes arise between teammates, and they wanted us newbies to have someone outside the situation that we could go to for advice. It came in really handy, because my team and I had quite a few situations the first year.

    My mentor also gave background on why things are the way they are. It really helped me to understand where others were coming from when they tried to be so controlling (yes, they even told me exactly how to set up my job board).

    She gave me ideas for professional development, as well...provided me with books to read and shared information about workshops she thought I might be interested in.

    Overall, your mentor is supposed to be there to help you in any way you need. If your mentor is not doing that, ask for another one. It might hurt her feelings, but if she's not doing the job she's getting paid to do, then so be it. You need help this first year, not someone who is going to blow you off!
     
  15. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2007
    Messages:
    2,233
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 24, 2008

    WHAT! You had to pay your mentor out of your own salary? That's just bad. And cheap. I wouldn't take it as a mentor. I'm mentoring this year, not getting paid for it, which is not nice either since we used to be paid for doing it.

    Mine is one of the people on my team. I'd have to give her the same advice and same information anyway since I'm team leader this year. So it's really a useless designation for me now.
     
  16. amber1011

    amber1011 Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2008
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 24, 2008

    my mentor talks to me every day (her classroom is across the hall). I would definetly find out what's going on with your's. Mine has provided so many suggestions and answered so many questions of mine. I really hope you find out soon....I don't think i could make it without my mentor!
     
  17. Chevygirl97

    Chevygirl97 Companion

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2007
    Messages:
    157
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 24, 2008

    Mine would just come in and make back-biting comments. "Ohhh. You're going to do it that way? Hmmm...well...I guess it's whatever they get used to." And then smirk on her way out. Super fun.
     
  18. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2003
    Messages:
    6,699
    Likes Received:
    66

    Aug 25, 2008

    I am a mentor and I am required to do certain things for the pay they give. That includes regular meetings, observations, etc. Definitely go to your principal and ask. I have to document everything and yours may be "fudging" the paperwork. If that doesn't help, look around at other teachers at your grade level, maybe one of them would be willing to step in and help. Good luck!!!
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 262 (members: 0, guests: 237, robots: 25)
test