What school setting you want to teach in and why?

Discussion in 'Student & Preservice Teachers' started by BigMeany, Nov 27, 2014.

  1. BigMeany

    BigMeany Rookie

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    I am a Preservice Teacher. Many of my friends say they would go where ever they can. But JUST not in an urban school. My personal preference is I prefer to be in a urban, title I, low-income boundary school. That is my highest preference, I prefer not to be in a Suburban, Rural, Private, or Montessori school; it is not appealing to me, I want to be in schools; where there is this preconceived notion that all students there are misbehaved, have attitudes, low-performing, fighting, low-income students and that is not always the case. I went to an urban school, I did VERY well, and it is mind-boggling and blood-boiling; that others can put down urban schools like they have no value to society. Anyway that is neither here, nor there. My question is being reinstated what type of school you rather teach at and why? Urban, Suburban, Rural, Private or Montessori. Put your :2cents: in....
     
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I teach in an urban/inner-city/low-income school. It's not at all where I pictured myself, but it was the first opportunity that presented itself. I was surprised to find that I could be successful in such a setting, because it is so far removed from the type of setting I myself experienced. The burnout rate is very high in these sorts of schools, though, even for teachers like me who have found their niche. It's not easy to teach in this type of setting.

    (I was really distracted by your use of punctuation. You might want to work on that.)
     
  4. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    I've worked in an urban, rural, suburban, and Montessori schools, but they were all title 1 schools. Each school has its own challenges and rewards.

    I guess I should work at a private school so I can say I've done it all. :lol:
     
  5. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    I'm at an online school that tends to serve a high-poverty population (at least 80% of our students tend to come from "disadvantaged" households). We teach students from every county in the state, so it's a mix of urban, suburban, and rural that I have never seen anywhere else. I love it because these students, for whatever reason, cannot manage in a traditional setting. I make sure they are offered an individualized, caring, thorough education.
     
  6. HistoryVA

    HistoryVA Devotee

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    I would like to try teaching at a smaller, suburban school. I've been at a very large, urban, low-income school since I started. I would love to see the difference.
     
  7. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    I teach at a very small rural school. I absolutely love it. We are considered a moderate poverty school. Quite a few of my kids are first generation college. I taught at a private school for awhile and hated it. I think it was just that school though. I did my student teaching at an early college high school that was only for inner city, first gen college students. I loved that!
     
  8. BigMeany

    BigMeany Rookie

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    That is cool! But I don't work at anywhere, but an urban school. This based on where I am located also. Because all states school systems aren't ran the same. I couldn't work at a private school. I rather not work at one or a montessori. The suburban schools where I am from have a majority of students that fall under the umbrella of high income. Also, I am in the city. None of our schools here are classified as rural under our school board. I won't go searching for them either. I just prefer to stick with the urban students.
     
  9. BigMeany

    BigMeany Rookie

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    That is true. It is one I forgot to mention also. I have one classmate that stated they might try online. I forgot their reason; but to them it had a lot of validity to why that would be a choice for them. I don't think I would do online either. It's not that anything is wrong with other type of school settings. I don't feel the need to be there.
     
  10. BigMeany

    BigMeany Rookie

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    I graduated from an urban high school. I think I've stated that before I don't remember my post verbatim. But I know a private school setting wouldn't be for me at all; even if my Mother owned it. That is just not my type lol. I am going to do my student teaching at an Urban school and also apply to teach at an Urban school. A lot of my former educators are principals at urban schools. So, that makes me much happier; because I network with them so much. That I have people to go to and show them my portfolio, get hired and placed in a urban school. I don't want to get stuck where I don't want to be. Because I wouldn't be happy at all, I would only tolerate it.
     
  11. BigMeany

    BigMeany Rookie

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    I also appreciate everyone comments that weren't shady. The teachers that are active teachers and preservice teachers. Thank you for replying. This post wasn't snarky. I didn't expect and I don't respect shady comments. But thanks to the others that replied after that first reply.
     
  12. BigMeany

    BigMeany Rookie

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    I originally replied to your post. But, we have nothing to talk about. I didn't ask for shady remarks. So have a nice day and be safe.
     
  13. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Advice on working on your writing skills isn't shady at all. You do need to work on your punctuation and grammar. Caesar teaches grammar. I'd listen to her.
     
  14. ready2learn

    ready2learn Comrade

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    I teach at a suburban school. I love it there. It is actually a unique mix because the school is very suburban now, but 5 years ago it would have been considered rural. This creates a problem of overcrowding, but it is good to see the mix of rural and suburban. I grew up in a rural school and started my teaching career in a rural school. The school I grew up in was great, but there were too many challenges at the school I started my career at for me to be really happy.

    Good luck in whatever type of school you end up in!
     
  15. HistoryVA

    HistoryVA Devotee

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    I agree. As someone attempting to become a teacher, now is the time for you to correct these skills. Sentence fragments won't help you get a job. Take well-intended advice when offered.

    Also, "Shady" means "suspicious" or "underhanded." Since the poster was very straight-forward, that's probably not the word you intended to use over and over again.
     
  16. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    BigMeany...you asked what in which type of school members prefer to teach, yet you don't seem incredibly interested in their answers. You seem to just want to put forth your opinion of urban schools.

    And yes, while putting forth those ideas, your grammar, syntax and punctuation undermine your effort to clearly communicate your passion. We ALL make errors here, typos (my first gen iPad couple with Chardonnay has resulted in a few errors of my own!:blush:), but your calling out a member for being 'shady' coupled with those errors and disregard for members' answers to your original question are not putting you in good stead. :sorry:

    That said, I ST in a Title 1 urban school. I've also taught in two different private Catholic schools. I've taught for the past 15 years in a high SES suburban district. I like teaching in a district where professional development is valued, teachers have some autonomy in making decisions on how to best utilize resources and lesson design to meet student needs, and where, despite tough negotiations and state politics, we are still well compensated.
     
  17. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Oh, so THAT'S what it is :) Just kidding !!! :love:

    I hope you guys forgive me for my everlasting errors though. Especially with syntax. My chardonnay usually doesn't allow me to fix those lol.
     
  18. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    I taught at an inner city school for one year, and I will never go back. I felt that the biggest part of the job was behavior management and teaching came second. I now work in a title 1 school with about 75% of students getting free/reduced lunch and a pretty high minority population. However, it's not an "inner city" school and that makes all the difference. We have issues with behavior but it's not out of control like my inner city school was, and our test scores are a bit better, to the point where at least the state is not breathing down our necks. Teachers in my state can now lose their jobs for poor test scores. In light of that, I don't know how the inner city schools are going to attract teachers at all.
     
  19. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Virtuoso

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    I work at a small, rural high-poverty school.

    We have five schools. (a pre-k/k, a 1/2, a 3-5, a 6-8, and a 9-12) There are between 125-200 kids in each grade.

    At least 75% of our teachers are from this town or have ties here somehow. I love it here. We are rural, but I can be in a major city in a little under an hour.

    The cost of living here is low. I was a homeowner at 28. I have a nice house with a big yard. I support myself comfortably.

    My commute to work is 4 miles of rural highway.

    I can't imagine teaching anywhere else.
     
  20. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I work at a suburban, JK-grade 8 school with just shy of 700 students. We are very culturally diverse; we have families from well over 40 countries and many of our students are first-generation Canadians. I love my students, admin and my colleagues. I especially appreciate that I don't need to "teach" about diversity--we live it.
     
  21. BigMeany

    BigMeany Rookie

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    If it was required of me to be doing a paper for which I would be graded on; then I would worry about grammar. So therefore; I am not going to dignify anymore of your post with a response. Goodbye!
     
  22. BigMeany

    BigMeany Rookie

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    Yet I didn't ask his or her opinion what grammatical errors, syntax errors and punctuation errors I made in my post. I simply asked one question and that's all needed to be answered. Am I correct? We went into a whole new world; which I did not care to listen to that opinion. As a result, your rant will be considered pointless also. My post has nothing do with being compensated. I am still trying to figure out what that has do with anything. That also could have been left off. What you've stated doesn't have anything to do with why I want to be in an urban school and doesn't compare to what I am talking about. I could have sworn I posted this for preservice teachers, but in the future I will make that disclaimer. I appreciated your post though, good day.
     
  23. BigMeany

    BigMeany Rookie

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    Thank for your post; so the setting you are in now; is the setting that makes you happy. That was my whole point of asking the question.
     
  24. BigMeany

    BigMeany Rookie

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    As I've stated before, if I needed help with writing skills. I clearly wouldn't have made it as far as I am now. Furthermore, I don't care to hear the opinions of him, you and her. Also, Ms. Dictionary Dot Com, that was not the context I was using "SHADY" in. I was using a slang term "SHADY" or "Throwing shade". My Problems are very much so corrected. I do not need someone telling me how to write in a forum.
     
  25. comaba

    comaba Cohort

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    If I'm not mistaken, preservice refers to those who are currently student teaching or in a field practicum. That's not you, is it?

    Furthermore, if you only want preservice teachers to respond, say so. I don't think anyone who responded is in that category.

    Finally, the advice regarding your writing skills was given kindly. In my opinion, it was much needed.
     
  26. comaba

    comaba Cohort

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    And why are you identifying yourself as a high school teacher when you're still waiting to be admitted to the college of education?
     
  27. MikeTeachesMath

    MikeTeachesMath Devotee

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    "Shady" and "throwing shade" are not interchangeable. Also, a teacher should know how to use a semicolon.
     
  28. HistoryVA

    HistoryVA Devotee

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    :yeahthat:


    Love, "Ms Dictionary Dot Com"
     
  29. HistoryVA

    HistoryVA Devotee

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    See, now THAT actually IS shady! :whistle:
     
  30. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Hmmmm...You asked:
    And again it seems you don't really care where or why members want to/do teach where they choose. Compensation is a factor professional educators consider...as are PD offerings, district demographics, class size, etc etc.
    Members here tend to respond to posts that interest them. Forum choice doesn't necessarily limit who might want to respond. No disclaimer required. A variety of insights, experiences and opinions make a conversation more interesting. And like any conversation, threads take twists and turns the op may not have anticipated, BigMeany.:2cents:
     
  31. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    :dizzy:

    Look up rules for a semicolon. Urban students need teachers with a strong grasp on grammar and punctuation. If you care at all for your future students, you will improve your own skills before attempting to teach them. Regardless of your content area, all teachers should be able to write coherently.

    Goodbye and good luck.
     
  32. ShortTeach

    ShortTeach Rookie

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    Of course we all have preferences. However, I wouldn't limit yourself to just urban schools. Even though this area tends to have the most positions available, you're still going to have a more difficult time finding a job if you set strict boundaries on where you'll go.

    I would prefer a suburban school. I attended a very diverse suburban school that had about a 60% free and reduced lunch rate. The demographic breakdown was pretty much 33% white, 33% African American and 33% Hispanic. Unfortunately my high school was also a pretty poor learning environment.
    Now I am student teaching in a suburban school. This school is super unique, though. The demographic breakdown is about 65% African American, 15% white and 15% Hispanic. It also has a free and reduced lunch rate on the higher end of the spectrum, but has a very good rating with the state and an amazing graduation rate.
    I find myself very comfortable in these environments. I get to work with all different types of people from different backgrounds and cultures. Every day is as much of a learning experience for myself as it is for the students. That being said, I would also be very open to a rural school because it would be completely different from what I am used to.

    BigMeany, I am new to the forum, so I can only speak to what I have read while lurking around. The other people on this forum seem to have a genuine interest in helping others. At the end of the day, I think that is why many people found this site; teachers are either seeking help or seeking to provide advice or commiserate with peers. As a hopeful teacher it might be wise to remain open to their advice as most of these folks have probably been around the block a couple times and you still have a lot to learn. At the very least, it might be a good idea to try to avoid making a bad impression and leaving people with a sour taste in their mouths here. Your grammar is sub par :sorry: and I understand that message boards are far from academic or professional, but that kind of grammar in a cover letter or resume will kill potential jobs. Not to mention, as teachers we should want to better ourselves and set a good example for our students. :thumb:

    I tried to put that as kindly as possible and I am not "throwing shade" your way. Just some advice. :angel:
     

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