What makes an applicant STAND OUT?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by frtrd, May 26, 2013.

  1. frtrd

    frtrd Rookie

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    May 26, 2013

    What makes an applicant stand out and get hired?

    GPA? Level of education? Amount (in years) of experience? References? Performance at the interview? Or some other quality?

    What can those entering teacher preparation programs do to make themselves stand out?
     
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  3. Rebel1

    Rebel1 Connoisseur

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    May 26, 2013

    Everything!
    If a teacher is blessed with all that you have mentioned, THEN he/she will be the one to shine!
    It can also depend on what the employers are looking for.
    The very FIRST STEP though is...DRESS TO IMPRESS!:)
    ..then make sure you bring your A game to the interview.
    Rebel1
     
  4. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    May 26, 2013

    Passion.
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    May 26, 2013

    Are you getting interviews?
     
  6. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    May 27, 2013

    On a piece of paper, leadership helps a candidate shine.


    If I were back in college (taking teacher prep classes), I'd be volunteering whenever I could- and for anything and everything. I'd join PTAs, help with fundraisers, make myself visible in my district of choice.
     
  7. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    I think GPA and education are the least important factors to stand out. Education is a must, for example you have to have a BA with credential, having a Masters won't be a deciding factor of who's chosen. It might make a difference in what you majored in, but I still think these are the least important.

    Experience is important, but again, it's not necessarily the deciding factor. Yes, they often choose people with more experience, but first year teachers (or those with only 2-3 years) still get jobs, so obviously they're chosen over others with more experience.
    Where you had experience is probably more important. If you want an inner city public school job and had 10 years private school experience, it won't be worth as much as if you had 2 years experience in the toughest part of town.

    I think references only come in to play later on, after you already shined. Although I hear that some districts call references first, but I don't think it's a deciding factor, it's just to screen, that the candidate has nothing to hide.

    Interview performance: yes, that can make you shine, it can be a deciding factor, but it alone won't do it.

    So in my opinion it goes in steps:
    - education and experience on your resume may grant you an interview. Especially if you have a good cover letter, that can make you stand out.
    - once at the interview, your performance can make you shine. It's not only how well you're dressed or how you speak, it's more about what you have to say (your experience, where, what you've learned, what you can bring to the table)
    - and then your references can clear everything, or maybe the deciding factor between you and someone else, if it's a close call.

    So it's kind of everything, like a puzzle, the pieces fit together for a good fit between school-teacher.
     
  8. InterviewTips

    InterviewTips Rookie

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    Jun 20, 2013

    Answer To What Makes An Applicant STAND OUT?

    So, what is it that makes an applicant stand out and get hired? Is it their GPA? Their level of education? The amount of experience they have? Their references? The performance during the interview? Or is it something else?

    While GPA, education, experience, references, and interview performance are all important attributes. The real key into getting hired is being the person that the company trust the most to do the job and to enjoy being around. It all comes down to feeling comfortable with you as an individual and having you as part of their team. So, to the extent that you can make that easy for them, that you can make it clear to them that you are someone they can be comfortable with, you will be the person selected for the job.

    There are a number of ways to create trust and comfort. Part of it comes down with creating a track record of work. If you can somehow demonstrate your skills and value before being hired, whether that's through a project, a recommendation, an internship, a portfolio of work, but in any way you can show your work, it's something the employer will trust. That will be a huge value added.

    If you can be someone the employer is comfortable with, by creating a relationship with that person. Whether, that’s through the entire job search process, through the interview, through the follow-up after the interview. You will be someone who the employer is more comfortable with.

    So, yes having strong credentials will help you be someone the employer feels comfortable and trusts, and yes having lots of wealth and experience will make an employer trust you more in your ability to do the job.

    The extent if you have all those attributes and go past it, and create that personal connection, that you can demonstrate value to the employer through work itself, you will be in a better position for that job. :thumb:
     
  9. cheeryteacher

    cheeryteacher Enthusiast

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    Jun 20, 2013

    Before the interview I think it's important to have a great cover letter and resume. An applicant (especially a first year) needs to be willing to do whatever it takes to get their info in the principals hands. Emails, going to the school to drop of resumes, whatever it takes.
    A principal searching through applications might look for a few years experience or that you graduated from a certain college (around here there is a certain college that teaches inquiry and our district is trying to get more teachers on board). They might look for buzz words in your cover letter like "balanced literacy" or "responsive classrooms" or whatever their particular district happens to be implementing at the time (this is why it's important to do research and tailor cover letters to the district and school). I would look to see that the applicant included something about my school or district that attracted to the job.

    At the interview I think charisma goes a long way. If the interviewers think you are easy to talk to, then it should be easy for the students to talk to you and build a relationship. Read through the job description and make sure you are prepared to answer questions about everything mentioned. A principal would not put "balanced literacy" in a job description if they weren't going to ask you about it. Be excited about your answers, this is your livelihood and passion after all. Give examples to back up your answers. Examples help you to paint a picture of your class for the interviewer. Bring pictures, data, sample lessons, or whatever and be prepared to use them. I used to make a little packet so if they asked about classroom management I directed them to turn to the classroom management section while I spoke about my experiences. It makes you seem way more put together when you can provide examples and proof. If you are that prepared for an interview, they would have no reason to think you wouldn't be prepared for the job. If you choose to make a packet make 8-10 for each interview. You don't want to get there and not have enough. Do not bring your whole 100 page student teaching binder because very few people want to go through it.

    I hope you can find some useful tidbits in the book I just wrote, lol!
     
  10. SCTeacher23

    SCTeacher23 Comrade

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    Jun 20, 2013

    Besides everything that was said above, I think being just an overall good fit and showing them why you want to work at their school and what you can bring to the table can benefit them. In my experiences, if I've mentioned specific things about their school in my cover letter (showing that I did my homework) and why my philosophies and teaching styles go with theirs has worked very much in my favor. I remember with one of my first interviews ever, I told them I wanted to work in their district because I said I liked that area of town and wanted to move there and they did not like that response. However, in some very recent interviews I had (one of which led to an offer this week), I discussed why I liked their school and how my beliefs were similar to theirs and related my experiences to their philosophies, which they liked.
     

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