What Kind of Employee Incentives would make you stay?

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by Hannah's Place, Apr 2, 2008.

  1. tiffsinny

    tiffsinny Rookie

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    May 28, 2008

    there's no sort of requirement for giving raises here in NY, nor in my former state of MI. the raises that we're supposed to get (but don't) are 3%...which is basically nothing. I get paid 8.25 an hour. People with a degree get a .25-.50 raise. When I'm done here, I'll never work for another nonprofit. I feel there is a gross mismanagement of funds at my job.
     
  2. keep_smiling

    keep_smiling Rookie

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    May 28, 2008

    Taliesin,
    Send me a job application...You seem to get treated very well. Its nice to hear that some people are are treated the way they deserve. You must be a great teacher...good job!
     
  3. Hannah's Place

    Hannah's Place Rookie

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    May 29, 2008

    Well thanks for all the responses, they keep coming!
    I was specifically asking for incentives OTHER than monetary...if there were any that some of you liked/didn't like, etc.
    I am a home based center and cannot no matter how I wish otherwise, afford to pay someone what they are worth. I don't make what I'm worth. We all know this as teachers/care givers/nurses/counselors!! Yes, we wear many hats and do much more than the "average" bear so to speak and few of us make what we are worth. Nevertheless, we are all still in this business for a reason (and it isn't the money) so what are OTHER reasons you stay where you are (please, no responses that are "I have no choice/gas prices/etc" I'm looking for people who like where they are for reasons beyond the paycheck -- if there are any reasons!!! Maybe there aren't any!
    And for the record, I forget who originally asked, but where I am there is no state mandated raise system or rules employers must follow. Only the mandatory minimum wage one can pay.
    Thanks for so many of your replies...there is alot on this topic!
     
  4. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    May 29, 2008

    There are all kinds of ways to boost morale.

    For example, host a meeting beside someone's pool. One company I worked for did this monthly during the hot months.

    Take turns supplying chocolate for a hidden chocolate basket just for staff (voluntary).

    We take turns providing breakfast for the entire staff every single Friday. Yes we eat in front of the children.

    Last year the teachers decided to suprise the aides and have a "you are technically off work but still in the room for pay reasons" day along with a brunch. It was very thoughtful. The same idea could be applied in different ways to different staff. The real morale booster was the SUPRISE part not what they did.
     
  5. Hannah's Place

    Hannah's Place Rookie

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    May 29, 2008

    Some great ideas, CutNGlue...and I have to say...surprises do work. For Teacher Appreciation day I had coffee, bagels and the like all set up pretty and OFF limits to the kiddies (until we teachers were done!). Staff was surprised and touched by it.

    I also do have a pool and Staff is allowed to use every day during nap/lunch/breaks etc. as long as kids are not present outside. Also I do extend the invite to stay after work to "cool off" in the pool. I love the hosting the meeting beside (or in!) the pool.

    Think outside the box, right??
     
  6. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    May 29, 2008

    I think little things count--bathroom for the teacher, a place to vent without fear of being overheard by parents, small gifts, someone covering recess duty for you, bringing in treats for everyone, just notes of appreciation. One principal I worked for made a point of sending (actually mailed it) notes of appreciation to four teachers a week. We were like little kids waiting to see who got them each week. She was sincere in what she wrote and most of us would have placed ourself in front of a train for her.
     
  7. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    May 29, 2008

    I've told this story before but it goes with that notes story...

    When I was hired it was 2 months before I would actually be formally moved to this state and start working. My P not only lined up a temporary roomate for me while I looked for a place for my family to live but she emailed me EVERY SINGLE DAY for two months telling me cute stuff about my class or just something little about herself. Sometimes she would just respond to what I said. Any way you look at it, I felt like the red carpet had been rolled out and now no matter what I think or feel about her at a given moment, all is forgiveable because my first impression wins hands down.
     
  8. tgpii

    tgpii Comrade

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    May 30, 2008

    I am not working at the moment so anything would work for me right now. One thing is make your employees part of a team. I worked at a place were employees were treated like the children. They would talk down to you and treat you like you were dumb. Also, so they you care about the Daycare. If the owner is never there, I know they don't care. Also, one time I had a family death, I ask to leave work early because the wake was over an hour away. They gave me a hard time about it. :sorry:
     
  9. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    May 30, 2008

    I am so happy to know I am not the only family based program trying to support staff and balance the budget. I am happy to see the conversations about morale and teamwork. These are things that are achievable. I really do appreciate my staff, more than words can express-however the dollars couldn't ever match those of larger programs.

    Please keep posting ideas that would keep you coming to work each day.
     
  10. Hannah's Place

    Hannah's Place Rookie

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    May 30, 2008

    Exactly, WAProvider...that is why I posted this!! While finding great help is extremely difficult (that is a whole other thread!), keeping them is vital!
    What most people find hard to understand is that money is so tight that raises/health benefits/etc. are not always possible. Last summer for example, I went without a paycheck in order to pay staff---the whole summer.
    But as to keep to this thread, I am grateful for the honest and unique ideas---keep them coming!
     
  11. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    May 30, 2008

    WaProvider and Hannah's Place...can I ask how many kids you have and are your center's actually inside your home? I had my own in-home for 3 years after I managed a larger center. I had 8 kids total (the state limit) and never had any employees other than a sub (my mom) that came in every once in awhile when I had to be somewhere. If you have more than 8 in WI, you have to get a group center license and can not operate it through your home anymore. In that case you would not be considered a home based program any longer in WI, but a regular group center.

    Hope you don't mind me asking. I'm just curious because home based centers around here rarely have regular employees, and if they have any it is no more than 1 assistant. When people ask about incentives for employees, usually they think of a large group center, and not a home program (around here, that is).
     
  12. Hannah's Place

    Hannah's Place Rookie

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    May 31, 2008

    JenPooh,
    No I don't mind. My home based center is just that, out of my home. I have two employees, one full time, one part time (she is a college girl and only works during fall/winter). I am allowed by my state to have 6 full time kids, 3 before/after school and I cannot have more than 2 under the age of 2 if I am alone. I chose to have employees not because I wanted to make less money (haha) but because I believe in the low ratios, its easier to teach different age groups with someone else to run another activity for the rest of the kids at the same time, and I didn't want to talk to myself at the end of the day!! Parents love it and while most women don't have "home daycare" employees, I run it more like a school and treat it as such all the while having the benefits of it being "in home".
    I posted this thread because I have had problems this year with my employees. One stopped showing up for work (she had been a great employee but had personal issues that took over) and then I had so much trouble replacing her. That is what prompted this question. I have a close friend who is a Kindergarten teacher (and also a parent of my school) who loves my program so much she wants to open a center with me because it is unique. Not sure about that, but for now this works for me.
    Now that you all have WAY too much information, I'll end by saying thanks for all of your input, it really helps!
     
  13. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    May 31, 2008

    We are small, but not any less important

    ;)Speaking for myself, my program is not tiny but it isn't large either.

    We are in Washington State (hence the WA Provider) and we have at any one time 12 children. Our program is popular because we have the mixed age groups that are the gift of family care. We serve birth to 12 and actually work with each ages topics in age appropriate ways (in small groups functioning inside the whole). Due to the perceived quality of the program we have an extensive waiting list. So as soon as one of our 12 goes to school there is a child ready to have the 9-3p time. We see up to 20 children a day, with no more than 12 at any time.

    I am also the president of our local Family Child Care Associaiton, which takes me to meetings often. So I usually run my full time staff, one part time staff and myself. That makes us have a 4:1 child to staff ratio.

    I usually have my employees start young (and in the afternoon) and then grow into the 40hr spot. I love my staff, and I have quite low turn over. But since I have such a limited group the monies that come in are tight. We have thought of opening a center (smallest centers in Wa are 12 people as well-then they go up from there) but we would have to give up the diversity of the mixed age time we have now. We could only hope for some preschool mixing and some school age mixing but not all of the ages together.

    So that is us.
     
  14. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    May 31, 2008

    That makes sense. I did things more or less how you do. I operated like a school. I only took kids ages 2-6 though in order to be able to facilitate a preschool program. Getting an assistant wasn't in my budget, but on certain days it sure would have been nice. :haha: I think parents really liked the fact that I wasn't a "babysitter" and that I ran an actual program. That was probably one reason why I never really had turnover and I always had a waiting list. I always liked the fact that I was unique compared to others in my area. It helped me always remain competetive. Most never did a "program", but I refused to just be a "babysitter". I'm pretty proud of the fact that all my kiddies went to K knowing how to read. ;):cool:
     

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