What is the lowest level of math your high school offers

Discussion in 'High School' started by EpicBacon, Jan 10, 2011.

  1. EpicBacon

    EpicBacon Rookie

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    Jan 10, 2011

    Special education courses do not count.

    My high school has an Intro to Pre Algebra class, some seniors are in it! The sad thing is, my son took a class academically equivalent to that in sixth grade.

    So it got me curious, what is the lowest level of math your high school has to offer?
     
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  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jan 11, 2011

    Well, our middle schoolers take middle school math; we're grades 6-12.

    But as a college prep high school, all freshmen who haven't advanced into geometry (32 out of about 600) take Algebra I. We offer it in 3 different tracks, but everyone takes Algebra.

    Realize though, that not everyone is gifted when it comes to math. If pre-algebra is the level they're on, then that's where they've got to be taught.
     
  4. EpicBacon

    EpicBacon Rookie

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    Jan 13, 2011

    Yes, but it'll be difficult to graduate being at that level at that time.
     
  5. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    We offer Algebra 1A, which is basically the first semester of Algebra 1 spread out over the whole year. It gives the teacher time to review missing skills.
     
  6. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    Jan 13, 2011

    I think we have pre-algebra.

    It seems like we have 2 "tracks"

    Track 1:
    Algebra I
    Geometry
    Advanced Math
    Calculus

    Track 2:
    PreAlgebra
    Algebra
    Geometry
    Business Math

    I'm in a different dept, so I might not have that quite right.

    I wish we did some sort of statistics class.
     
  7. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    What did last year's Seniors do?
     
  8. Chrissteeena

    Chrissteeena Companion

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    Jan 13, 2011

    The lowest level of math that the H.S. I went to offered was Sequential I; broken up into three years. It was a full year of Basic, a full year of Intermediate and then a full year of Advanced. After you finished the Advanced level, you would take the regents.
     
  9. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    For those of you not from NY State:

    Sequential Math was a 20 year experiment by NY. In each of 3 consecutive years, students learned a little about algebra, geometry, trig, probablility, statistics and logic.

    NY gave Regents-- statewide exams-- at the end of Sequentilal I, Sequential II and Sequential III.

    So Christeena is saying that the lowest level kids took 3 years to complete what the average kids did in one.
     
  10. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Jan 13, 2011

    Algebra I
     
  11. midwestteacher

    midwestteacher Cohort

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    Jan 14, 2011

    We offer:
    Pre-Algebra
    Algebra I
    Algebra II
    Math Analysis
    Calculus
    Geometry
    Consumer Math

    It is aggravating when lazy seniors sign up for Pre-Algebra because they don't want to have to work. Most of them have already taken Algebra I and just need another math credit. They can take Pre-Algebra in junior high and since it isn't on their high school transcript, they can take it again.
     
  12. EpicBacon

    EpicBacon Rookie

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    Jan 14, 2011

    That answer varies since everyone is at a different level. There is a number of Seniors in Intro to Pre-Algebra and there is a number of Seniors in AP Calculus. In our state, we have something called a modified diploma; where if you fail to reach the standards for graduation you'll receive a different diploma that only lets you to go to a two year college.
     
  13. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jan 14, 2011

    I'm sorry, I wasn't clear.

    I meant the seniors who took that lowest level math class.

    After they get their Associate's from a 2 year college, they can transfer, right? You can do that in NY; it's how my sister and I both got our degrees.
     
  14. EpicBacon

    EpicBacon Rookie

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    Jan 15, 2011

    Yeah you could transfer, but receiving a modified diploma will make you have to spend an extra two years in college just to get into a university. Also I don't think having the special diploma looks good when you're applying.

    Another thing to consider is that you don't get instantly accepted into the community campus, if you're modified than you'll have to pass a challenging entrance exam, and kids with this diploma aren't the smartest.

    I sort of feel sorry for the school really, they're trying so hard to get the kids to pass. A decent amount of people said the lowest type of mathematics education offered is Pre-Algebra, for us that's what the academically average freshmen are taking. There are half days every single Friday for students who don't have to make up work, if you have to make up work you stay until the regular day is finished.

    As you can see, drastic measures are being made to get people to pass. It's working for some, but not everyone.

    Plus, our governor is considering putting less on the state's budget into education and I dread what will happen when the campus has budget cuts.

    My son is a pretty smart guy, I've actually been thinking that him attending there is going to look bad when applying for colleges. He is a lot more smarter than I was at his age and I went to a university with ease. It'd be really unfair if that happened to him.

    Sorry, that's probably MUCH more of an answer than you wanted, but once I started with this I went on to venting.
     
  15. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Jan 15, 2011

    Texas is now on a 4x4 plan which means every student entering high school has to have 4 years of science, math, English and social studies regardless of academic placement.

    The lowest track for math:
    Algebra I
    Math Models (a cross between Alg. I and Geom, so I'm told)
    Geometry
    Algebra II (although they are developing a business math in the district to replace this option)

    The very highest track (offered only to a precious few district wide):
    Geometry
    Algebra II
    Cal
    Trig
     
  16. alschoolteacher

    alschoolteacher Companion

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    Jan 15, 2011

    The high school I went to and that my brother-in-law currently attends has several different tracks. The lowest is...
    Algebra 1 A, Algebra 1 B, Geometry, Algebra 2
    The highest (besides the few who leave campus to take college courses) is...
    Unified Geometry, Algebra 2, Trig/Advanced Math, AP Calculus
    I took a different track and ended with Alg. 2/Trig.
     
  17. EpicBacon

    EpicBacon Rookie

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    Oh wow, only three electives for all of high school then. o_O

    Or do you guys have more than seven periods over there?
     
  18. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Our students take 8 classes a year, so they will graduate with 36 credits. There are 22 or 23 required courses (4 math, 4 English, 4 science, 4 social studies, 2 foreign language, 1 or 2 arts depending on what they are, 2 P.E./health/ROTC, 1 computer) so that will leave them with 13 or so credits worth of electives. Ours is called the Louisiana Core 4, though after sophomore year you can opt out of it and decide to go the career track, though in order to receive one of these diplomas you must take an actual career course and graduate with career training. I think this diploma only allows you to attend a community college, but I'm not sure.
     
  19. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Jan 15, 2011

    We only have 7 periods a day, so yeah, they have almost no chances for electives. :( A lot of schools are moving to what's called a "zero" period for year long/4 year programs like band, choir, athletics... It's basically a class offered an hour before or after the official start of day. The kids still receive credit for them, but they are only an option if you can provide your own transportation to and from them.

    There are LOTS of concerns/complaints about the 4X4, especially in science. We're struggling enough with finding science teachers as it is, and now they are going to require every student to take physics?! Yeah. Where are they going to find the teachers for that?
     
  20. EpicBacon

    EpicBacon Rookie

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    Jan 15, 2011



    I don't think science and history are that important really. You forget 80% of it later in life, and you don't really need anything beyond basic knowledge of the subject.
     
  21. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Our fourth science doesn't have to be physics. It can be bio 2 or chem 2 or environmental science or any number of science electives. A few of the career courses count as well, like the ones in the medical careers program or the engineering ones. I think it's ridiculous to expect that every student will be interested in taking physics.
     
  22. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    I think science and history are important, and I don't really think there's anything wrong with requiring 4 years of each, but I do wish there were more options. I *don't* think that every student needs physics...
     
  23. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Celia, I think we posted at the same time! LOL. Our schools don't have to offer physics either, but because of budget constraints and lab restrictions, etc., some schools (like mine) can *only* offer that.
     
  24. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    I agree that science and history are important as well. Students really should have more choices in these areas. I would have loved a class in Ancient Greece when I was in high school...however, when I got to college I was able to find such courses!
     
  25. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    We are really lucky that we are able to offer neat electives, like forensic science, film studies, mythology, poetry, African american history, military history, novels, etc.
     
  26. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    That's amazing! I really think that the classes should be offered to the students based on what the students really want to learn. If you have a group interested in sports---why not offer a class in history that revolves around the history of sports and how sports have changed through the years or even been effected by history.

    It just seems like a great way to keep students interested!
     
  27. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Mopar, wouldn't that be amazing? If they actually allowed us the freedom to teach kids about things in which they might be interested? LOL. It's sad that we only have the "cookie cutter" model of education. :(

    Sorry, OP, for the thread jack! Go math! LOL
     
  28. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Oh don't I know! I know even in sixth grade they would be more energized!
     

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