What is the future for Special Education Teachers?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by wadon, Jun 11, 2014.

  1. wadon

    wadon New Member

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    Special Education teachers will still be needed. The regular education teachers will not have the knowledge nor motivation to learn the in and outs of special education. Inclusive of the fact that an IEP must be properly maintained on special education teachers and the services must be rendered in accordance to what is on the IEP. This is a legally binding document that stipulates that this is what we are going to do for this child. Further, this is the targets or educational activities this child will accomplish at this respective level within this respective time. If IEP are not maintained as they should lawsuits can and will follow by parents / and or advocacy groups which can lead to millions lost by school districts and state departments. Thus special education teachers will be needed but their role and scope may change a little. They will be more of inclusion teachers in which they come in and work with students and assist teachers and properly providing the accomodations stipulated in the IEP.
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  3. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    My best guess is that they'll largely end up going the way of the dodo bird once privatization and corporatization really gets running, and the push to full inclusion will only make it easier.
     
  4. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    With the way things are going I expect they will be more of a consultant than actual hands-on teachers. With the exception of severely handicapped students. I expect those students will actually be moved away from traditional school settings. Or rather, all of the other children will move away from them. When this becomes the norm I expect budgeted money would shift and we will separate children by needs.
     
  5. MonicaWinter

    MonicaWinter Rookie

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    Maybe it's just me and the area I'm interested in, but I see TONS of job postings for Special Education teachers! In rural West Virginia, it looks like Special Education teachers will be around for a while!
     
  6. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Wouldn't that be taking a huge step back? Wasn't this how it was done years ago? And that was changed so that those students would be in a more inclusive setting.

    I don't see sped teachers going away. I expect their roles to change. For most districts, this will be like a previous poster said on a more consultant basis or more like co-teaching. In my district at the secondary level, they are more like tutors where students come to their room as needed.
     
  7. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Prior to becoming an administrator, I'd never stepped foot in a SpEd classroom.

    This year, however, I spent lots of time in our special day classroom. The teacher had to attend several professional development seminars; however, substitute teachers never picked up the vacancies! Since her absence wasn't covered by a sub, I stepped in and took over her class for the day (on several occasions, actually).

    Boy, do I have a great deal of respect for what SpEd teachers do! Although she only has 10 kiddos in her class, each has autism, ADHD, specific learning disabilities, etc. In fact, some of the students fit into all three of the aforementioned categories.

    I don't see special education teachers going anywhere in the near future (in CA, at least). They have a very important job that a regular ed teacher isn't equipped to deal with.

    Kudos to the special education teachers out there. I truly appreciate what you do!!!
     
  8. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    It would be returning to how things were way back when. In some of the cases.

    But with school vouchers and charters becoming more common, more and more non-sped students are going to be flocking to those, leaving a greater proportion of sped students behind in the regular public schools. Eventually these schools will have a reputation of being "special education" schools and no one else will attend.

    Just a silly projection based on current politics.
     
  9. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    I think you are somewhat joking here, but in all seriousness this is happening in secondary at my district. I work in a moderately low SES district surrounded by several very high SES, high performing districts. When "school choice" came about and students could start open enrolling elsewhere, many students left our district for the higher SES, better funded neighboring ones. Since sped is funded differently, districts don't have to accept open enrollment students who have an IEP (they are allowed to say their sped programs are full), so they have to stay put in their home district. Although many families will choose to send their students to our elementary schools, they want to move them to the neighboring districts for secondary. The sped population at our elementary schools is at about 10%. The sped population at the middle school is about 35% because so many other students leave and the sped students can't.

    As for the future of special education teachers, I absolutely see those positions going away in the future. With the push towards "full inclusion" and services inside the classroom, I think admins will realize they don't need certified teachers to assist in classrooms. I think it will be more like one certified teacher who is in more of "case management/administrative" role for 100+ students(dealing with paperwork, meetings, and managing paras), and then paras will be in the classroom with the students.
     
  10. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Thank you. It's a little shocking how many people on this thread think special ed teachers can be used as consultants or tutors. Yes there is a lot of paper work/out of the classrooms stuff that comes with teaching special ed. but the brunt of my job is teaching students and managing some extremely unique and often difficult behaviors and learning styles.
     
  11. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Special education teachers are needed now as much as ever. Charter and private schools are allowed to get students tested. The special education teachers I know are just as swamped as ever testing students. They are just testing students from public, charter, and private schools. I have had students tested from my private school before. I believe, although I am not positive, that this started under the No Child Left Behind Act.
     
  12. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    In my area, we as public school employees are responsible for testing private school students for special education. However, the private school has no responsibility to implement an IEP or provide services even if we find a disability, which is why they typically don't even have their own special ed teachers. Same with charters. They either don't offer sped at all, or they only offer mild/mod. They can say they don't have the programming available for more severe needs.
     
  13. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Hey, I'm not saying it is right, I'm just saying that's where I think we're heading.

    And I'm at the high school level. Very few of our students need direct instruction from sped teachers.
     
  14. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    I'm a former special ed teacher. I don't think a special education teacher CAN be used as a consultant or tutor. I just think they ultimately WILL be used liked that until the position largely fades away. There are lots of trends that I don't think CAN be done well, but will happen whether I like them or not.
     
  15. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    This is so nice to hear. Thank you! Our admins won't ever step foot in our classrooms, and, if they do, they're out the door as quickly as possible. Even when we don't have subs to cover us, they just rely our paras to scramble and cover our rooms. And, when a para is out, they never bother to stop in and see if we're doing okay short-handed. I've always wondered why admins don't have to spend a few days in the sped classrooms in the beginning of their admin career. It's so different from what goes on in a regular classroom, and you would think that admins should have some idea of what is going on in ALL of their classrooms! Thanks for taking the time to help out your sped teacher and for sharing your insight you gained with us here! :)
     
  16. PrincessDaisy

    PrincessDaisy Rookie

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    This actually happened in a school I subbed at. In the early 90s, more and more special needs students moved in while more advanced students moved away. It became a "public" school that only took in special needs students. Severe special needs were bused to that school from all over the district.

    That got overturned this year, because busing was too much money. It happened in some areas. I don't think that sort of thing can last.
     
  17. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    In my district, the teachers and admins are wanting sped teachers to become consultants and tutors ON TOP OF being teachers, not instead of. They're just asking us to do more and more, with no extra time in the day. I don't see sped teachers as teachers going away anytime soon in my area - at least not in elementary. I just see them being asked to add on other roles in addition to teaching, meaning that they will probably not be very effective in any of the roles because they're being stretched too thin.
     
  18. benj009

    benj009 New Member

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    Wow. Such pessimistic attitudes toward special education. I'm from NJ and I've seen plenty of special ed positions in the newspaper. I think that it's changing. Jobs in this field are always going to be there. Whether it's in the public or private schools there will be a need for spec educators. Now, what we could see is a shift away from the public school and we could have a greater need in the private sector.

    I remember a few years ago when people were saying that the virtual classroom was going to eliminate teachers. Teaching was going to be done via big screen. It hasn't happened.

    In South Korea they have been experimenting with robot teachers so who knows what the future brings.
     
  19. marid4061

    marid4061 Rookie

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    When our school district went to all inclusion the para-pros lost their jobs since they were not needed in the self-contained classroom. When I was in grad school my professors often talked about education taking the turn where all teachers would have sped endorsements along with whatever other education degree they were seeking. Therefore, no need for another sped teacher in the classroom? We hear talk of just having sped teachers in the building to just write IEP's and hold meetings and consult or pull out the students who need help. Education is forever changing...who knows.
     
  20. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    I've heard the same prediction- that all teachers will have a sped endorsement. I wonder what that would look like at the high school level.

    I can't see me getting one.
     
  21. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Maven

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    The OP looks like he/she copied and pasted from somewhere. If so, where from?
     

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