What is the difference between these 2 - teaching strategies?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by McKennaL, Jul 27, 2011.

  1. McKennaL

    McKennaL Groupie

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    Jul 27, 2011

    Ok... working on my ESL endorsement. And I am reading an article about Effective Writing Instruction. ELLs or Native Speakers... most of these teaching techniques are the same (just good common sense).

    But this article mentions two instructional strategies that... I really can't tell apart. can you help me?

    This is exactly what it says about the two:

    SHARED WRITING
    *Teachers act as a scribe and demonstrate the writing process in front of the students.
    *Teachers emphasize the composing process and aolicit assistance from the students so they can work together to plan the writing content
    * Shared writing is collaborative processes between teachers and students.
    *Students begin to get in on the craft of writing.

    _OR_

    INTERACTIVE WRITING
    *A dynamic collaborative literacy event in which the children compose together with the teacher
    *Students and the teacher determine certain words, phrases, the organization and text layout.
    *Students move beyond shared writing and participate in the writing process.

    Ok... now forgive me - but that sounds like tomayto/tomahto.

    What do YOU think?
     
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  3. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Jul 27, 2011

    I agree, there isn't much difference at all. It seems though that maybe the "shared writing" is more teacher driven because it even specifies that the teacher is acting as "scribe" and it's the beginning of crafting writing. Interactive writing might be with a little less teacher control.

    I dunno! LOL
     
  4. smurfette

    smurfette Habitué

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    Jul 27, 2011

    Agree with bandnerd. I see interactive writing as letting the students pick up the pen, where in shared writing, the teacher has the pen the whole time and does think-alouds.
     
  5. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Jul 27, 2011

    Shared writing is much more teacher controlled. The students offer ideas, but the teacher may change the sentence around to make it fit, think-aloud about adding a transition word, etc.

    In interactive writing, the students are usually coming up to the board and writing. The students are changing sentences around. The teacher might say something like, "How does this sound so far? Do you think we need to change anything?" The students are the ones making changes or not making changes.
     
  6. McKennaL

    McKennaL Groupie

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    Jul 27, 2011

    Thanks so much... I am seeing what you are saying.

    Love this forum...ALWAYS can count on you folks!
     
  7. smurfette

    smurfette Habitué

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    Jul 27, 2011

    I didn't understand the difference at first, either, and used them interchangeably. I asked the exact same question you asked to our reading specialist a few years ago.
     
  8. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jul 27, 2011

    I was just writing about teaching writing to ESLs on my blog. How funny. Thanks Mopar for clearing that up!

    McKenna, a lot of the strategies for teaching EL students are common sense, but they are good to think about. Otherwise, we might miss their importance (I just did a post on my blog about illustrations as a pre-thinking strategy for ELS).
     
  9. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jul 27, 2011

    I suspect part of McKenna's point is that strategies that work well with ELs often work extremely well with EOs, too - they're not so much common sense as simply good teaching.
     
  10. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    I really think the strategies used for ELS should be used for all students. Agreed! They're really just good teaching strategies.
     
  11. katie11

    katie11 Rookie

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    Jul 29, 2011


    i agree with this that shared writing helps in collaboration between teachers and students. Teachers have a great control over it.
     

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