what is RTI?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by jessiiteach, Sep 8, 2011.

  1. jessiiteach

    jessiiteach Companion

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    I keep hearing about RTI but searching the internet to find out what it is exactly didn't really help.
     
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  3. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Response to Intervention. A process to monitor and track the progress of kids who are currently receiving intervention services, and make decisions for their education.
     
  4. jessiiteach

    jessiiteach Companion

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    So is it something a school purchases? Or does it vary from school to school?
     
  5. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    No, it's not a program in and of itself. It is a system that schools adopt.

    Here, read this.
     
  6. Sheila

    Sheila Comrade

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    Road To Insanity:D
     
  7. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    a tiered process to monitor and assess kids who aren't successful in the regular classroom academically or behaviorally. Tier 1 is basically regular good instruction that all kids receive, tier II is the teacher providing extra instruction or an extra behvaior plan, Tier III is the teacher continuing regular instruction and the extra stuff, plus a third person specially trained to help "tutor" in whichever area they need. The third tier for behavior tends to be behavior consult/observation and that kind of thing.
     
  8. knitter63

    knitter63 Groupie

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    :rofl:
     
  9. frogger

    frogger Devotee

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    I so agree!
     
  10. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    I was hired as a tier two teacher to work with the students who needed extra math help. I did not have a program. I tested and worked with the students in the beginning of the year to figure out what concepts they are missing/need to work on. My math "program" was heavily hands on with many real life problems thrown in. I worked with no more than 6 students at a time.

    I think it's a great program if you hire extra people to help the teachers out and you all collaborate and work together. The school also hired a tier two reading teacher. :) She worked up to 12 students at a time and had a miserable year. I told her she needed to half that and she had a much better year. :)
     
  11. Hitchcock fan

    Hitchcock fan Companion

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    We call it POI, or Pyramid of Intervention, at my school. I think it makes more sense, because it's easier to visualize students being at different levels (or piers) of service.
     
  12. a_apple_z_zebra

    a_apple_z_zebra Rookie

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    Sep 17, 2011

    RTI is also a means to determine if a student would likely qualify for special education services.
     
  13. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    RTI--I think it is a small step forward for an intervention system. One concern is that it seems like we are so busy labeling and spending $$$ on students who have some difficulty in reading, we forget this isn't all that is needed.

    Yes, this is very important to help struggling readers. I also think though that some schools are forgetting the importance of challenging the good readers. Also, I find that children are incredibly sensitive to labeling. I find teachers can be incredibly creative in finding ways to help the slightly lower readers without being so overt as RTI can be.

    I like more things than I dislike about RTI. However, I do feel it is good for a school to allow teachers to use their creativity to deal with the implications that this program has on students.

    Kevin
     
  14. msufan

    msufan Comrade

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    Sep 18, 2011

    RTI is a way to prevent students from entering special ed, which saves the district $$$, by requiring teachers to document all sorts of various things they've done to accommodate that student's needs before any kind of additional help can even be considered.

    Or maybe that's just my view... :whistle:
     
  15. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    That's too bad. At my school, RTI was a GREAT resource for our struggling math and reading students. I may be biased since I was hired to be the math RtI teacher, but it was a GREAT program (biased again because I started from scratch).

    I did work with a lot of students who were on IEPs and I did have four students who may need special ed services, but they still learned a LOT when they were with me in their small group.

    In fact, I had MANY students that I worked with by the end of the year who were now ahead of some of their classmates and reached proficient or even advanced status. Proud math teacher here! :D
     
  16. Sam Aye M

    Sam Aye M Mr. Know-It-All

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    Sep 18, 2011

    The IRIS Center has a good introduction to RTI. It can be found here:

    http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/resources.html
     
  17. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

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    Peachy- I wish that we had someone like you on staff. Our math and reading interventionists do not really help with documentation. It all falls on the gen. ed. teacher. It is a lot of paperwork. I am great at keeping notes on my kids. I keep copies of their work. But I have yet to find and easy efficient way to document progress over time that is not time consuming, and tedious. I do it because I know some kids need the interventions to eventually get them the help that they desperately need. But it is a difficult process.
     
  18. Curiouscat

    Curiouscat Comrade

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    RTI is a lot of extra paperwork for me! sorry, but it is true. I have to have a packet in a file folder for each child. Every time I work with the child I have to document what I did and for how long. If someone else works with the child (that does not happen often) they have to fill it in and give it back to me. Before I work with the child I have to fill in 4 pages of information. We think it is designed to discourage us from having children tested for special educ. Services.
     
  19. Lynnnn725

    Lynnnn725 Connoisseur

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    RTI is a ton of paperwork for me as well. I feel like I have to write down the same information 458749857 times for the same child. And then I have to do the same thing online! I have a lot of children this year - about 10- that I will be using RTI and I'm not looking forward to the paperwork.
    However, I do understand that it is a way to help eliminate unnecessary testing and a way to make sure we've done everything possible before testing.
    I've been named as one of the RTI reps for my school and I go to one of 5 trainings tomorrow. I hope I get some useful information.
     
  20. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    I feel the same way. I think RtI is a great idea but flawed in many schools. I got many students through tier 3 that would have been tested and labeled with a disability had we done the discrepancy model and tested/identified them right then and there. However, after a few months of intervention they were right up to grade level and moved on.

    I always hear people talking about RtI saving money...I think it seems the opposite in my district. Our program is flawed like anything else, and it seems to me that we have kids in RtI FOREVER (1-2 years, not kidding) before we finally get the approval to officially test them and identify them for an IEP. That's not the spirit of RtI. So for those 2 years that the student is not on an IEP, the district is receiving no additional funding for them, since they don't count as a student in special ed. However, they are spending just as much time with me and other specialists as a sped student would...so they are using all of our resources yet we get no funding for them. For example, I have a girl literally going on her 3rd year in RtI this year, and was just yet again turned down by our district "diversity team" to test her and get her on an IEP because her dominant language is still Spanish. So she will yet again be taking up a lot of my time and services, while we get no funding for her.
     
  21. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    That's frustrating. In my school district, it was the opposite, in a way. We would look First at all of our students who had an IEP and work figure out what needs they had. We would place them in my math or reading or both. THEN, we would place around them other students that needed help or were struggling around the IEP students to form groups of similar needs. It worked out, but was hard work to get it all to work.

    And our RtI groups were always changing. I would have one kid in there for a month and then exit him because he fulfilled his goal, and then later on have him back in because he has a new goal to work on.

    I'll be honest, though. Part of the reason why RtI was so successful was because I did my research on this program and had to be firm about it when I first started my job. For example, they wanted me to have 12 kids at one time (or more). I had to put my foot down and say, no, that's not what RtI is about. Also, moving kids in and out based on their needs. I had to be on top of exiting students when they were ready.
     

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