What is Life Skills Self-Contained?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by otterpop, Jun 28, 2016.

  1. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2013
    Messages:
    3,836
    Likes Received:
    1,443

    Jun 28, 2016

    Asking for a friend...

    Can anyone provide more information about what a Life Skills Self-Contained teaching position would be like for middle school?

    I know it's special ed, but where does it fall in the spectrum of services? Would these students have more specialized needs than the resource/pull-out kids but be higher functioning than moderate-severe? What would an average day be like for a life skills teacher?

    My friend is an alt-route candidate who has experience in education and subbing SPED. This person enjoys teaching resource classes, which serve students with dyslexia and other learning differences, but I don't know if they would enjoy teaching students with more severe disabilities.

    Thank you for any information you can provide.
     
  2.  
  3. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2013
    Messages:
    3,836
    Likes Received:
    1,443

    Jun 28, 2016

    I wasn't finding much at first, but did just come across this:

    http://www.masters-in-special-education.com/faq/what-is-a-life-skills-teacher/

    which sounds like it would be teaching students about "making your bed, performing all your bathroom routines, making yourself meals, dressing, communication, and many other (tasks)".

    So, maybe not the job my friend is looking for... still interested in others' thoughts though.
     
  4. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    9,668
    Likes Received:
    2,414

    Jun 28, 2016

    Life skills self contained in middle school is going to be more severe. I was just at a grad class last night where we were talking about a life skills program they run. It includes students with OCD and autism primarily, with some with cognitive deficits. Your research is almost exactly what I saw and heard last night.
     
  5. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2008
    Messages:
    2,019
    Likes Received:
    19

    Jun 28, 2016

    When kids spend the day in classes that are not academic (life skills) they fall under mod/sev eligibility. In other words it has been determined that they would not benefit from the core curriculum. They also probably have low adaptive skills so the need for instruction in 'life skills' is greater than the need for core academic instruction.
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2016
  6. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2013
    Messages:
    3,836
    Likes Received:
    1,443

    Jun 28, 2016

    Thank you both. :)
     
  7. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    6,486
    Likes Received:
    1,390

    Jun 28, 2016

    A life skills class also includes some academics on the students cognitive level. Some of the students can learn to read, recognize coins to the point of counting some money, etc. When my son was younger, he spent the majority of his years in school in life skills classes. They took field trips to places like the grocery store, the fire station, etc. They were taught how to do laundry and fold clothes, how to prepare simple foods, etc. He had some of his finest teachers in the middle school/high school classes. But, it isn't for everyone.
     
  8. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Messages:
    4,330
    Likes Received:
    566

    Jun 28, 2016

    What happens in the classroom will depend upon the students. In my experience, these kids will not get a high school diploma but instead an attendance certificate. They may or may not get core course instruction but they won't take regular classes. Instead of Biology and Chemistry, they might have Science class just as elementary kids do.

    Here, these kids take field trips regularly to places they will go when they are older. They are taught how to shop for things and some are even prepared for entry-level positions once they leave.
     
  9. MLB711

    MLB711 Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2011
    Messages:
    376
    Likes Received:
    53

    Jun 28, 2016

    I subbed often in middle school Life Skills and my experience was very similar to what SwanSong described. The students in this class also did jobs around the school. Some students shredded papers in the office. Some helped in the Library by shelving books (if there wasn't a class in there). Some collected the recycling. Another group cleaned up the classrooms (one was a traditional class, the other was an apartment style classroom). Every day they also practiced jobs around the apartment like folding clothes, making the bed, doing laundry, washing dishes, and doing some different pattern-making puzzles. Academics included writing their names/addresses/phone numbers (some from memory and some copying), learning basic sentences and stories, basic math facts, coins and value, telling time, etc. The aides really helped modify activities for their small groups too. Some students could rattle off their times tables while others repeated math facts from cards because that was their ability level.

    Honestly I loved subbing in life skills, especially with the group of teachers I worked with. Good luck to your friend!
     
  10. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2013
    Messages:
    3,836
    Likes Received:
    1,443

    Jun 28, 2016

    Thank you all! I've forwarded your responses to my friend... that's a huge help. I think it may be something they are interested in, too. :)
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. MissCeliaB,
  2. Mrs. K.
Total: 476 (members: 3, guests: 455, robots: 18)
test