What if . . .

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Tyler B., Dec 2, 2013.

  1. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Groupie

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    Dec 2, 2013

    all the teachers from the highest performing school in the district, most likely found in an affluent part of town, were transferred to the lowest performing school - nearly always found in a low income area?

    A recent study examined something like this when they gave a $20,000 incentive to older, experienced teachers to teach in low performing, low income schools (which were heavily populated by new teachers).

    What happened? The more experienced teachers got better results.

    Across the country, districts are doing away with incentives for masters degrees and raises based on experience. These districts often hire Teach for America teachers who, with a degree and 5 weeks of training, attempt to better the performance of experienced teachers. This study casts more doubt on these efforts at improving education.
     
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  3. CindyBlue

    CindyBlue Cohort

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    Dec 2, 2013

    This could mean they only had three years of experience (to get on the charts as a "high performing teacher"), right? And in middle schools, there was "no evidence that the intervention raised test scores."
    As an older, more experienced teacher, I think that teaching experience is very helpful. I'd sure like to see a study that really backs this up!
     
  4. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    I honestly can't understand how this could even be debatable. Other than looking pretty, what doesn't improve with experience? This is only my fourth year teaching but I have so many more skills and ideas to draw upon than I did as a newbie. I'm not any smarter; I've just been there.
     
  5. Honest_Teacher

    Honest_Teacher Comrade

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    I don't see anything about the "more experienced teachers getting better results."

    I see teachers who were judged to be highly effective teachers based on value-added measures being incentivized to move to lower-performing schools and getting results. How did they gauge which teachers were highly effective? Hint: it wasn't based on years of experience or education level.

    "High-performing teachers were defined as those with the highest value added scores over three years, where value added is a measure of teachers’ estimated impact on student test scores, taking into account their students background and prior achievement."
     
  6. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    I think it's the experience that's doing the talking here, not the fact that the teachers are from higher performing districts. I think when you look at standardized test scores many teachers in affluent neighborhoods aren't doing anything spectacular to get those scores, its a matter of the socioeconomic make up of the district. Yes replacing more experienced teachers with less experienced teachers will make a different. But replacing teachers from an affluent neighborhood with equally experienced teacher from the lower performing district wouldn't make much of a difference I don't think
     
  7. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Dec 3, 2013

    Tyler, I would definitely point out that you've made the point that better teachers in lower performing, poverty-stricken schools can improve student achievement dramatically :).
     
  8. Honest_Teacher

    Honest_Teacher Comrade

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    It's a value-added measure. It compares student growth in one year vs. his growth in all of his past years.

    The SES of the school does not matter.
     
  9. Honest_Teacher

    Honest_Teacher Comrade

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    But I thought poverty was the sole cause of low student achievement?! :eek:
     
  10. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Dec 3, 2013

    So I just typed out a really long response to this, but I just realized you may be saying this in a joking way teasing the opposing view about the view that poverty is the sole determinant of student achievement. You're not thinking I believe poverty is the sole determinant, right?
     

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