What happens if you fail student teaching?

Discussion in 'Debate & Marathon Threads Archive' started by Razzle82, Aug 10, 2010.

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  1. applecore

    applecore Devotee

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    Aug 11, 2010

    I'm sure you will do wonderful with student teaching if you have made it thus far in your program. Have faith!

    We were told in the beginning "worst case senarios" that would make us have to drop out of ST and take it up the next semester available (meaning, we had to work around their schedule since we needed to make up the time). It was a "fall back" for 2 people I know from my cohort that had no choice but to do this...and they both did very well. Grant it, it was tough financially, but it worked out.

    Best wishes!
     
  2. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    Aug 11, 2010

    :yeahthat:

    I was told by my university that I needed to be at school whenever my CT was. I didn't wait for school to begin, I met my CT at the annual meeting for ALL school district personnel at the beginning of the school year. I introduced myself to her, then attended two workshops with her that afternoon. I arrived at our school the next morning to help her (and other middle school teachers) finish getting their rooms ready for the students. So I was at the school working for a week before the students even began coming. Once the school year started, I arrived every morning by 7:30am (and sometimes earlier) and I stayed until at least 4:00pm. When my CT offered remediation, I stayed for that as well. It was very rare that I left school before her in the afternoon. More often, I stayed a little later grading papers or looking over the material for the next day. Then, when I got home, I would do my lesson plans and daily reflections on my PC. The daily reflections came in VERY handy when I had to have a parent/teacher/principal/student meeting regarding a kid that decided he just didn't like me and told his parents I was "picking on him" in class. At the meeting, I was able to hand them a two-page list documenting just SOME of the things their darling had done in my classroom, complete with dates and times because I had it all documented in my daily reflections. The parents made the student apologize to all the teachers and principal. :cool:

    During my ST, I asked for 1 day off so I could take my mother to a doctor's appointment out of town, but even then, I usually put in 1-2 hours every night browsing the internet for ideas and lessons I could use in the classroom.

    Teaching is very hard work that requires a LOT of extra hours to really do right. That's just the way it is. If you look at some of the vents veteran teachers have, many of them involve coworkers who show up just before classes start and try to beat the buses out of the parking lot in the afternoon. They don't want to spend a minute more at the school than they have to. Unfortunately, teaching doesn't work this way. Extra hours are part of the job.

    If all you're willing to do is the minimum required, then you are going to difficulty in any job you do. No boss or supervisor wants the employee that puts in the least amount of time they can. They're looking for the ones that do whatever they can to help the company. In schools, this means they are looking for the teachers that will work on committees, coach sports, sponsor a club, organize field trips, help decorate (and CLEAN UP) the school for special events, etc.
     
  3. MrsHoot

    MrsHoot Comrade

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    Aug 11, 2010

    Just to add my 2 cents about timing, etc, I student taught 3 years ago and I had one awesome CT and one all right one. The awesome CT worked a lot longer hours. We were supposed to be there for the same amount of hours as our CT. I struggled with that a little bit, because I was there for 10-11 hours some days. Honestly, I was staying after, got my things done, and then would end up waiting around for her to leave. Even as a first year teacher, I did not work 11 hour days. (Unless there were conferences of course) Then again, I do a lot of work at home instead of staying at school. =)

    That being said, my second CT was on her last year before retirement and worked the bare minimum. I was almost always there before and after her. Obviously the length of time varies from person to person, but it still is hard work! I also needed to write very detailed lessons and was extra prepared. But it is all in the practice of becoming a better teacher.

    If you're nervous now, imagine how nervous you will be in your first real teaching job! You'll be glad that you had student teaching to prepare you, but you will feel like there's no way you should have classroom on your own yet, lol. =)

    I wouldn't worry about failing, just get ready to work hard in your classroom!!
     
  4. jenglish97

    jenglish97 Devotee

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    Ms.I ~ No problem... I felt it was a good example to share with everyone and how I tried and the ST tried or had difficulty.
     
  5. plurple

    plurple Rookie

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    Aug 11, 2010

    HAHAHAHAHAHA.

    So YOUR schools required you to be there the whole time. Mine didn't and when I found this out my master teacher was a complete BITCH and still refused to budge an inch. This lady was extremely f'n mean to me. So how can you call it BS when you only read a few sentences about my experience? HA, HA, HA.

    And btw, I am NOT a brand new teacher. I just have not taught GEOMETRY yet. Don't think you did me any favors, Alice, because you haven't.

    All I know, is if I'm ever a CT, and my ST comes to me practically in tears and drained and isn't even sure they want to teach anymore, I will do WHAT I CAN to help the ST, and NOT sit there and get ****** at them because I might "THINK" they want to do less.

    The point of sharing MY story was to point out to the OP to be sure of what is expected of them, which I said in my post. You can go ahead and take my story personally... I'm off these boards for good.

    Idiots.
     
  6. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Aug 11, 2010

    Best wishes.
     
  7. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Here's what happened to me and why it took me two years beyond graduation before I was credentialed.

    In California, most people take a year to a year and a half of post-baccalaureate work to get their credential. No masters, just a credential. Very few programs allow you to do it while an undergraduate.

    For the three semester program, you do a semester of observation, a semester of teaching 1 period, and a semester of three periods. I got my initial credential, by the way, as a single subject social studies teacher. My first two semesters went very well.

    For my third semester, I had the 8th grade class from hell. Social Studies/Language Arts core. A mix of low SES, high-risk students along with affluent GATE and GATE wannabee students. The high risk kids did all they could to prevent any learning from taking place in the class. And the parents of the GATE and GATE wannabee students did not like the fact that their kids were in this class and had a student teacher. So when things went south, they started complaining to the principal.

    Moreover, I took over the class from the first day of school. All of the GATE and GATE wannabee kids thought they were going to have my CT as their regular teacher. So did their parents. Everyone adored her, since they had all had her for seventh grade.

    The school was being remodeled. The classroom was a trailer. Not a portable, but a trailer. With the hitch still on it. Wood paneling, like those used on construction sites. The staff restroom was a portapotty. There were also no books, curriculum, or supplies. If I had been smart, I would have said on the first day "I can't teach here, reassign me or I'm taking the semester off."

    But I wasn't that smart. I thought I could do it, but I couldn't.

    About 6 weeks in, I have a meeting with the principal and the vp (who was also the CT for my other one period class, an ELL 9th grade history class that was actually going OK, but he had no way of knowing because he was almost never there). Anyway, they tell me that I'm on the verge of being let go, that I'm really not a very good teacher, and so on.

    Two weeks later, my university supervisor (who was actually married to my 8th grade French teacher who had given me a D in 1974) observed me for the final time and told me I was done. I would have cried if he had told me I was done for good, but he told me I'd be allowed back next semester to finish and added that he didn't think I had it in me to be a teacher. At that point, I didn't really care what he said I was actually just glad to be out of that educational pit disguised as a middle school.

    I'm not making this up. When I got in my car, the song playing in my head was "Hate and War" by the Clash - If someone locks me out, I kick my way back in. That became my motto. I went home, called my Air Force Reserve boss, and told him to put me on the flying schedule for everything he could find in the next three months.

    There was still one more big dump that CSUS had to take on me, however. Instead of giving me an incomplete for the semester - which would have allowed me to re-do my student teaching free of charge - the professor chose to fail me. I appealed for a grade change on the basis that you can't fail someone less than half way through the semester. They denied it because I was re-taking the class so the grade would be deleted. So I had to pay another $800 the following semester. And that time, my university supervisor actually was the wife who had been my 8th grade French teacher. Uber freak out, but then I remembered the song by the Clash and everything work out OK.
     
  8. English Guy '09

    English Guy '09 Rookie

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    Aug 11, 2010

    Way to persevere! Also, isn't music grand?! It's amazing how much a song can lift you up after having a bad day.
     
  9. MissJill

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    Aug 11, 2010

    I cannot believe that plurple even posted what she did.
    What school would actually allow you to NOT be there full time?
     
  10. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Aug 11, 2010

    I think plurple's point, though not exactly expressed in an appropriate matter, is a valid one.

    One of the unspoken, underlying problems in the teaching profession is student teacher abuse.

    People lose sight of the fact that student teachers are college students who are not being paid and who often still have to go out and work at other jobs in order to pay for books, tuition, and room and board. Student teachers also have to other classes they have to attend and for which they have to prepare.

    A student teacher is receiving college credit for a certain number of hours. To require them to exceed those hours for any reason that does not directly related to their teacher education is unfair and unethical. And to simply say that they need to experience everything a teacher does throughout the day is not acceptable.

    Student teachers should not have to do bus duty, yard duty, or any other extra duties that teachers normally do as part of their contract that are not part of teaching. Those are things that are generally specific to a school site, and not part of general teacher training. They should also not have to attend staff meetings if the majority of the meeting is about housekeeping matters that relate only to people who are actually permanent at the school. One of the biggest "why am I here?" moments of my life was when I was a student teacher and spent an hour and a half after school listening to the principal talk about health benefits and next year's placements.

    Now, if you want your ST to observe other teachers, or to observe you teaching, that's fine. If you want your ST to spend extra time doing things like one-on-one assessments, that's fine too. Those things directly relate to teaching and the knowledge gained transfers to other sites.
     
  11. MissJill

    MissJill Cohort

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    I disagree with you, but maybe because my school made it so that student teaching and a seminar class were the only things we had our last semester.

    I believe the student teachers should absolutely do all the extra things that you listed, how else are they going to know what teaching is really like. Those faculty meetings are crucial, and when I was student teaching I actually got quite a few professional development hours.

    My philosophy is to get the most out of every experience and doing things half assed is not going to get you the full experience.

    I came in early, I stayed late, I planned every lesson, reviewed every lesson with my CT, and I took over for as much time as my CT was comfortable with. Since my school had us do our clinical hours with the same CT she was already comfortable with me and I taught from the first day of school until winter break. I attended all professional development days, faculty meetings, faculty parties, and extra duties. I think that this helped me when I eventually landed a job because I was prepared for everything.
     
  12. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    Aug 11, 2010

    I had 2 student teacher placements. One CT was great. She was nurturing and sympathetic but also had high standards. The other one was an apathetic curmudgeon. I had to do his lunch duty so I didn't have extra 1:1 time with him to plan. I just hung in there and made the best of it. I ended up taking a lot of work home because I got a ride with someone to the school and had to get there when she got there and leave when she wanted to leave. I did not have the luxury of staying at the school extra time because I also had other classes to get to after school. Every student teacher experience is different and not every situation will be ideal.
     
  13. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    But you did those extra things voluntarily or as required by your university, not the school you were teaching at.

    It pisses me off when I see student teachers after school with orange vests doing crossing guard duty. Schools have the responsibility to teach those parts of the job to newly hired teachers and not make them a requirement for student teaching.

    As for staff meetings, one of the jobs of the CT should be to determine ahead of time the agenda for a staff meeting and decide whether or not the ST needs to be there. That's what I did when I was a CT. If 80% of the meeting is devoted to things like scheduling, next year's events, or personnel matters, then the ST should be excused.

    Bottom line is that schools are in no position to require anything from student teachers that is not implicit in the course syllabus for student teaching.
     
  14. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    Different school districts may have the responsibility for training new hires how to do crossing guard duty, but student teachers need to realize this IS part of being a teacher, regardless of which district you work at. You might not actually do crossing guard duty, but you WILL be expected to do your share of lunch, recess, hall and traffic duty during the year, in addition to planning lessons, grading papers and contacting parents. It IS part of the job and the main purpose of student teaching is to help determine if the student will be capable of handling the job or even wants to continue pursuing the career once they learn everything that is involved.

    During my ST, we took the middle school kids on a "reward" field trip at the end of the 1st 6 weeks. When the teachers learned I was a fully-licensed bus driver (meaning I could drive the big activity buses in addition to the regular school buses), they naturally assumed I would drive on the trip. I was happy to do it, but when I asked the P if I would get paid for it (since this was a different activity than student teaching), he said he believed the teachers assumed I would be driving for free and hadn't included the cost of a driver in the fund request. At the time, I had NO JOB at all, so ANY money I could earn was desperately needed. It rankled me a little, but I decided the benefit of helping the school and building future connections was more important than 1 day of pay.

    My CT was also very good about after-school meetings and developmental workshops. She would find out what the agenda was for the meeting and told me several times I did NOT have to attend if I didn't want to. I did attend some anyway, but decided to skip a few that dealt with issues like you described. I was VERY happy to skip a workshop we had at our school. I couldn't get professional development hours for it and the CT said she really didn't think they would be covering anything vital, so I could go on home that day if I wanted to.

    I understand the point was trying to make and I realize some ST "abuse" does happen every year. But the way (s)he stated it made it sound like "I'm only going to do what I absolutely have to and nothing else." Any 1st year teacher can tell you that will NOT get you in the good graces of your admin or coworkers and could very well cost you a job in the tough market we have right now.
     
  15. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I think there are 2 separate issues: What you can realistically demand of a student teacher and what they should realistically demand of themselves.

    As to the first: in an ideal world, I think colleges should require that Student teachers would do a round robin of the duties required of teachers in that district. So they would do a few weeks of bus duty (WITH the CTs there, not "instead of") followed by a few weeks of cafeteria duty and so on. They would get a good idea of what teachers are required to do-- after all, that's what student teaching is supposed to be, right???? But they wouldn't be seen as free labor, since the CT, as a licensed professional and not a college student, would be on hand in case of a problem. (Realstically, I would imagine that "issues" are more likely to happen outside a regular classroom. Speaking as a mom, the only call we got from my kids' elementary school this year was when Julia got hurt at recess and needed immediate dental work.)

    As to the second point: I think that a saavy student teacher should go above and beyond in trying to get as varied a student teaching experience as possible. Mostly because working as a professional is MUCH easier when it's something you've already been exposed to before. But also because it's bound to be a HUGE help at interview time. Whether it will give glowing recommendations from schools or enable you to bring it up at interview time, having varied experiences can't possibly hurt you when job hunting. Sarge mentioned that schools should teach newbie teachers how those jobs are to be done; how much stronger a candidate you would be if you could say you had already done it a ___ school. Sure, the system is bound to be slightly different. But a principal could assume that you at least had a handle on the basics.
     
  16. indigo-angel

    indigo-angel Companion

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    Aug 11, 2010

    OP, you've gotten a ton of insightful advice here. However, I would caution against the notion of being able to make mistakes with your Mentor as your safety net. On your very first day or meeting with your Mentor, discuss exactly what she expects from you. I feel confident in categorizing Mentors into three groups: 1) a mentor who will allow you the freedom to do as you please within reason. S/he will serve as a guide or resource, but really wants you to get the full experience and may not micromanage you; 2) a mentor teacher who expcts you to do things exactly the way s/he does and will hold you accountable for doing so; 3) a mentor whose philosophy is "sink or swim" and won't provide you much support.

    Please keep in mind that you are being evaluated on your performance and you are a guest in the class.
    In the first week, also begin interactig with the students because you'll learn names faster that way and they get used to your presence. If you're lucky, you might have the opportunity to observe in the class before you start.

    Lastly, don't be nervous or afraid going in. Figure out early on how you can be successful with your mentor and go from there.
    Best Wishes!
     
  17. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    FWIW, my school is going to have a student teacher IN THE SPRING (not in my class, in 2 other elem. classes), and she called her CT to ask if it would be ok if she came in before school and on the first couple of days even though it wasn't her semester yet, just because she wanted to learn about the preparation and first days of school.

    That's dedication. Is she getting paid, recognized, or acknowledged in any way? Nope.

    Well, unless you count every teacher who was impressed by her desire, AND our principal. Hmm, I wonder whose name will come up next time there is a J-O-B available?
     
  18. Mrs. R.

    Mrs. R. Connoisseur

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    Wow... That is just unnecessary and uncalled for.
     
  19. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Once again, I'll side with Alice here. I never required my Student teachers to do extra duties outside of teaching. However, I did most definitely require them to get there before school started and stay after school. I needed to go over her lesson plans with her, give her ideas, and feedback. Also I needed to see how she was evaluating students in MY classroom. She also needed to be there to assist students who needed help. I would not require her to become a coach, a crossing guard, etc. However, I will require her to do what is required of her to be a good teacher, whether it is in her contracted hours or not.
     
  20. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Aug 11, 2010

    Also FWIW, when I was student teaching, I was so desperate to impress every single person in that school that I would have scrubbed the toilets at midnight if they asked me to.
     
  21. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    I agree that extra dedication and commitment during student teaching can go a long way towards getting a job later on. One of the things I did on my own was attending sporting events for the kids and cheering them on; volleyball, basketball, softball and baseball. I didn't go to all the games, but I went to as many as I could. It really helped developed a bond with the students when they saw I cared about them outside of the classroom. My CT and another middle school teacher (whose son was one of my students and played sports) both mentioned this commitment to the students in their recommendation letters.

    I agree student teachers should not be viewed (or treated) as free labor. I wouldn't dream of a school "requiring" an ST to coach a team. I also wouldn't agree to making them work as a crossing guard, unless that was a rotating duty shared by all the teachers. In that case, then yes, the student teacher should take a turn as well.
     
  22. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I really can't relate to the issue of student teachers being treated as slave labour. All of our student teachers come to us with clear expectations from their program as to what they should and shouldn't be doing. While they can volunteer to go above and beyond (and most do), we can't expect them to do more. It saddens me to think that there are teachers out there who host student teachers in an effort to off-load some of their work. I've encountered the opposite--teachers who are reluctant to host student teachers because of the extra work involved.
     
  23. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    I think it's especially bad in CA where the credential is a totally separate program from the BA degree. Most people don't even do them at the same college.

    And the way financial aid worked when I went through, you weren't an undergrad, and you weren't a grad student (because it didn't lead to an MA.) So basically you got no grants and had to rely on student loans where the interest started accruing immediately. In order to not have to go insanely into debt, most of us tried to hold down part time jobs while we were student teaching.

    Therefore, we were reluctant to commit to anything beyond our required three periods a day.

    And the university did everything they could to keep us from getting any money for anything. For example, a lot of us had our emergency 30 day substitute credentials. Therefore, if our CT was out sick, we could actually sub for them as far as the Dept. of Education was concerned. But the universities had a long standing rule that prohibited us from getting paid in any way for student teaching. Thus, when I was in the third semester and my CT was out for a day, they paid a substitute to come in, take roll, and then go to the teachers lounge while I taught the class for nothing.
     
  24. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    That situation is really unfortunate for all concerned, Sarge.
     
  25. DallasTeacher

    DallasTeacher Companion

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    Wow, I'm in shock over what I've been reading. I've had 7 ST and NONE stayed after school, except on a very, very rare basis. They were NOT assigned duties and they did NOT take over my c/r. I was the teacher of record and while they did plan and teach one lesson a week, it was not the come and stay beeing written about. In fact, this is the first time I've ever heard pf staying as late as the CT. I run track after school, actually last period since last year and have an after-school kick-boxing program. Never would I expect a ST to stay. Crazy.
     
  26. FarFromHome

    FarFromHome Connoisseur

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    They only teach one lesson a week?? I started off slow, but ended up taking over the whole class. I thought that was what all student teachers did.
     
  27. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Obviously different programs have very different requirements. Most of the student teachers we have at my school are in either their second or third student teaching placement (out of three) and are, by the end of the placement, teaching for at least half of every day. By close to the end of their third placement, they are planning and teaching the entire day.

    The most important thing about student teaching, regardless of the expectations of the program, is to gain as many varied experiences as possible and to learn everything you can.
     
  28. magister

    magister Rookie

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    My ST lasted three months with me going solo for two weeks at the end. You have to be really incompetent to fail ST. No one wants you to fail. Do the work. Fill out the forms. I'd say if you get a B or anything less, you'd better reevaluate your career choice because there's no reason for it.

    After ST and getting a real job, I realized that ST was not the crux of my career, so no need to stress about it. I heard about a ST at my school who was horrible, didn't know what was going on or anything. She somehow managed to get a job later on.
     
  29. DallasTeacher

    DallasTeacher Companion

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    I can't imagine turning my class over to an uncertified individual for two. Maybe they taught two lessons/days of the week the last week or so, but definitely not three days. There was co-teaching occurring almost the entire time. As a parent I would be very distressed to learn that my boys had been taught for two weeks straight by a student teacher. Also ST in my district are NOT to be left unattended with students. In my district, teachers are not crossing guards, bus drivers, nor do we have cafeteria duty. We have two planning periods daily, one state mandated and the other our dept/pod time. My ST have been in my classroom anywhere from 5 weeks to 8 weeks, depending on whether they were undergrads or graduate students.
     
  30. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

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    The student teacher I had this past spring met with me before the semester started, was there every day as long as I was unless I told her to leave (I tend to stay late and putter,) and took over all five of my classes for four weeks. I watched her teach, gave her advice, and gently corrected mistakes. As a parent, I think I would have been distressed to find that my child was being taught by a first-year teacher who had not had this level of experience during student teaching. Different states, different philosophies.
     
  31. cmorris

    cmorris Comrade

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    During my ST, we started out observing and slowly built up to our "solo week." Then the cooperating teacher gradually took the class back over after that. I was periodically left alone once she knew I could handle it. Of course, my university required very detailed plans (2-3 pages for every lesson of the day) and my CT looked over it. We always discussed it, and she shared her expertise and resources.

    I'm floored that some student teachers do not have at least a solo week. That was a great experience for me to have. She was especially impressed with my math lessons, so that is when she would usually leave so I could get a feel for teaching without someone observing me all the time.
     
  32. Ms. I

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    Aug 11, 2010

    My univ was on the qtr system & we were req to ST all by ourselves for the last 2 wks of the qtr. I ST 4x's as I've mentioned bef because I hv 2 creds (mult subj & mild/mod disabilities). Regarding doing it all myself, I had it pretty easy all 4x's.

    Somehow, the 2 terms I was working on the mult subj cred, I only really was on my own for 1 wk. I guess my CTs weren't familiar w/ how it went. For the 2 qtrs I ST for my mild/mod cred, both my CTs felt that doing that all on my own for 2 wks was a little harsh since spec ed was diff frm gen ed & they both just let me be a little more independent towards the end.

    Of the 4 CTs I've had, 1 was one-of-a-kind STELLAR, 1 was pretty good, another was OK, & the other was eh. I got good evaluations from them all.
     
  33. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    Aug 11, 2010

    Running track and an after-school kick-boxing program are entirely different and - as I stated before - clearly outside the expectations a CT should have for the ST. Now if you are staying late to grade papers, work on lesson plans, conference with parents or do remediation, then YES, the ST should be included in that.

    As for the different ST requirements, I have to admit I'm shocked as well that some STs do 1 lesson per week. I observed for two weeks, then took over 7th grade the 3rd week and 8th grade the 4th week. I taught both grades solo for 10 weeks each. The CT normally stayed in the room to supervise and (occasionally) offer guidance or help, but there were also times when she left me in the room on my own.

    I felt a little nervous about that at first, but my uni supervisor said that showed she obviously trusted me with her students.
     
  34. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Aug 11, 2010

    I don't think you can fail student teaching and get a credential. I think there was a poster here a long while ago who that actually happened to but I can't recall what happened. It's pretty hard not to pass, though, I think, so I would do just my best and not worry about that.
     
  35. DallasTeacher

    DallasTeacher Companion

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    Aug 11, 2010

    1 lesson would be an entire day or two depending on whether we were on a block schedule. It seems some states set up ST as "free" labor. STs can't stay late if they have a class on campus. I've seen the long and detailed lessons plans required, along with other course work. Our STs mainly are required to be on the campus during normal school hours. Some of what I've read is nonsense. Sorry, my opinion.
     
  36. cmorris

    cmorris Comrade

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    Aug 11, 2010

    The university I attended would not let you take additional course work during student teaching, and they strongly discouraged working another job because of the time required.
     
  37. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Aug 11, 2010

    So only the independently wealthy can be teachers there?
     
  38. cmorris

    cmorris Comrade

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    Aug 11, 2010

    I have never been wealthy, but most of my classmates and I just took out the maximum of student loans allowed and lived off of that. I honestly have no idea how those with families did it.
     
  39. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    Aug 11, 2010

    I know someone who changed her major because ST is a year, she is a single mother, and the university will not allow her to work during ST.
    It was the same at my school, though I think some people would sneak and work a few hours because they understandably needed income, but I remember people struggling with the "you are not allowed to work" issue.

    I don't agree with that policy at all..
     
  40. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

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    Aug 11, 2010

    One student teacher failed last year at our school. She had to do a month over again. Two weeks with the classroom teacher, then two weeks on her own. I don't know if she had to pay for it. But I do know that she didn't take the whole semester over again.
     
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