What grade/age does your school focus on personal addresses and phone numbers?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Backroads, Feb 17, 2016.

  1. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2010
    Messages:
    3,622
    Likes Received:
    1,920

    Feb 17, 2016

    So today I did a bit of a preassessment on my kiddos for a Me on the Map unit, just looking to see how many of them knew, more or less, their physical place in the world. I was somewhat surprised to discover the majority of them did not know their physical street address. (I also had one kiddo who did not know what planet he was on, but that's neither here nor there). I did my part and decided to give that some attention in coming lessons, but my last school, where I taught first grade, addresses and phone numbers were a huge part of kindergarten curriculum and then slightly reviewed in first. I currently teach 2nd grade. No criticism, just chalking it up to different schools and different ways, but it did get me curious to know when this gets hit at your school, or when your personal philosophy would have it.
     
  2.  
  3. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2005
    Messages:
    5,280
    Likes Received:
    748

    Feb 17, 2016

    Many of my third graders do not know their numbers and addresses. We don't ever touch upon it in our curriculum. We do make a poster using math about themselves so they can learn their birthday if they don't already know it.

    But I'll be the first one to admit, now that I use my cell phone exclusively, I have yet to memorize my mom's cell phone number. My parents' home phone is the same as it was when I lived at home 28 years ago so that I can rattle off in a heartbeat.

    Many of my kids' families change phone numbers often so it might be hard to keep up. Most are semi-stable and don't move every couple of months, but I've had students who do. That would be very confusing for kids.

    There are even some kids I've had who didn't know their middle names, much less how to spell it. (And yes, my best friend who teaches pre-k has had some poor babies who don't even know their first name. How does that even happen? I guess the tv that taught them to talk left out that tidbit.)

    Now I've depressed myself! On to happier thoughts....
     
    Backroads likes this.
  4. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2010
    Messages:
    3,622
    Likes Received:
    1,920

    Feb 17, 2016

    I recall going to a well-baby visit for my daughter at age 1 and the doc wanting to know if she recognized her name. Sad some preschoolers wouldn't know.
     
  5. MLB711

    MLB711 Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2011
    Messages:
    376
    Likes Received:
    53

    Feb 17, 2016

    I remember we had to memorize our name, address, and phone number on our first day of kindergarten and probably had to write it successfully from memory by the end of first. I honestly do not know if the teachers at my school have it in their curriculum.

    In my friends life skills class, the students had to practice writing their name, address, and phone number for HW. All the kids had tracing paper in a sheet cover so they could just practice with dry erase marker and then erase it when finished. I always thought that was a great idea.

    Some of my 7th graders couldn't tell me what county they lived in at the beginning of the year. That made me very sad for them. At least most of them knew their address
     
    Backroads likes this.
  6. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Groupie

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2015
    Messages:
    1,245
    Likes Received:
    433

    Feb 17, 2016

    I've worked at 2 different schools (One in the Chicago suburbs & one in farmland (haha) IL) that had us teach our Pre-Kindergartners their full home addresses and phone numbers (with area code). The majority of them mastered both, several of them learned both parents' cell phone numbers. Only a few of them knew their address but not their phone number & vice versa.
    I observed in a Special Education 4th-5th Grade class (functioning at a 1st/2nd grade level) during grad school and those kids were learning their home addresses.
     
    Backroads likes this.
  7. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2009
    Messages:
    3,424
    Likes Received:
    596

    Feb 18, 2016

    Many of our parents don't want the school to have their correct phone number or address, so this would be a futile activity for us. When I taught kindergarten, I sent home an optional assignment to learn your phone number and address, and encouraged parents to help them, but that's as far as it went. By the time they get to high school many of them change numbers and move so much that they still don't know their address and phone number. I always have kids who have to call home and ask when we do standardized tests.
     
    Backroads likes this.
  8. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2013
    Messages:
    2,985
    Likes Received:
    435

    Feb 18, 2016

    I don't think we do this for any grade at my school. They may do it in Kinder, but they don't know it by 4th.
     
    Backroads likes this.
  9. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2007
    Messages:
    4,461
    Likes Received:
    1,485

    Feb 18, 2016

    We are a K-6 site. You'd be shocked to know the number of upper grade students who don't know their address or phone number!
     
    Backroads likes this.
  10. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Groupie

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2015
    Messages:
    1,245
    Likes Received:
    433

    Feb 18, 2016

    Ahh! Everyday I find out things on this forum that frustrate me. When we were kids, we knew our phone numbers, our relatives numbers, our friends' numbers, and all of their home addresses. I knew my first boyfriend's phone number even though we all had cell phones by then & actually I still remember it to this day. Eventually my parents got cell phones and their numbers changed every 2 years and I memorized them every time.
    This is important stuff, what if the kids get lost? They don't know their address or phone numbers?
    What is this world coming to??? :(
     
    Backroads likes this.
  11. janlee

    janlee Devotee

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2003
    Messages:
    1,157
    Likes Received:
    9

    Feb 18, 2016

    When I taught second grade I would tell my students it was important that they know their address in case they got lost. Many of them knew their address as a POBox. I explained that yes their mail went to the POBox but if they were lost would a policeman be able to put them into that box? Many then wanted to learn their actual street address.
     
    Backroads likes this.
  12. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2010
    Messages:
    3,622
    Likes Received:
    1,920

    Feb 18, 2016

    Interesting spectrum of replies here.

    I suppose I think they'll learn their addresses when they really need to learn them, but that does seem to me like a bit of important information to have about.
     
  13. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2009
    Messages:
    3,424
    Likes Received:
    596

    Feb 18, 2016

    I grew up in a town so small that I didn't have a house number. I still don't know the address to that house, and we still on it.
     
    Backroads likes this.
  14. adeeb

    adeeb Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2014
    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    2

    Feb 18, 2016

    I feel that addresses and phone numbers are basic information that the students should learn and memorize in Kindergarten, if not by first grade at the latest. I'm pretty sure I knew my address and phone number by first grade.

    Kids growing up these days won't know a world without instant internet access almost everywhere, so I feel it is beneficial to stress the importance of memorization. Sure, they can save this information into their phones (I wouldn't be surprised if some first graders had phones these days), but encouraging them to use their brains could help with strengthening their memory. Your phone won't always be accessible, but your brain will always be there, guaranteed! :)
     
    Backroads likes this.
  15. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2010
    Messages:
    3,622
    Likes Received:
    1,920

    Feb 19, 2016

    A few years' back my in laws were slapped with actual street addresses. No one in the community understands what the addresses mean, but it's now on the mail...
     
  16. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2009
    Messages:
    3,424
    Likes Received:
    596

    Feb 19, 2016

    We had to get one, too, when they started using a 911 system. (When I was growing up, we didn't have a 911 system. It just connected you to the police station, but it didn't give them any information about the call or location or anything.) But I don't know it because that happened long after I moved out.
     
    Backroads likes this.
  17. Francess Silveria

    Francess Silveria Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2016
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    2

    Feb 20, 2016

    I too teach second grade and was wondering this...until I realized how hard it would be for them considering nearly a third are in shared custody situations, another has moved twice this school year, two others do no have land-lines (each parent has a cell phone). Which information should they memorize? I've been having them take a greater interest in KNOWING who is supposed to pick them up that day before whoever drops them off in the morning leaves campus. I've been having them ask who to have the office call today if something comes up. I have one little boy who stays with his grandparents sometimes, one parent other times and the other parent at others - all variable at the drop of a hat. And they wonder why he's a handful when it comes to behavior.
     
    Backroads likes this.
  18. Francess Silveria

    Francess Silveria Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2016
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    2

    Feb 20, 2016

    Oh, and we're working on memorizing the school address and phone number.
     
    Backroads likes this.
  19. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2010
    Messages:
    3,622
    Likes Received:
    1,920

    Feb 21, 2016

    Ooh! I like this idea!

    I decided, for now, I would add to the homework for next week, an optional "challenge of memorizing important family addresses and/or phone numbers". After reading this and thinking of my own student population, I'll hold back on grading such things while still noting the importance of knowing such information.
     
  20. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2003
    Messages:
    6,809
    Likes Received:
    190

    Feb 21, 2016

    Don't forget area codes when teaching phone numbers. My cousin's son was learning in pre school & they would teach the 1+area+number.
     
    Backroads likes this.

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. miss-m
Total: 209 (members: 2, guests: 179, robots: 28)
test