What *exactly* are your responsibilities?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by 16lp, Feb 22, 2015.

  1. 16lp

    16lp Rookie

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    Feb 22, 2015

    I mean, yes, we teach, we write IEP's, attend meetings etc. But are you in charge of setting up the meetings, contacting parents, getting everyone together? Do you have to administer, score and interpret all academic tests for initials and triennials? Are you responsible for all the paperwork and tracking down parents who won't sign, don't show up, etc? Do you have to deal with students that are more mod/severe even though your credential is mild/mod? There are a host of other duties I'm leaving out I know...

    I'm wondering because I see a great disparity between districts (I am currently in a cohort of folks in the MA program and most of us are working in the field) that astounds me. So how much do you have to do?
     
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  3. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Feb 22, 2015

    Pretty much yes to everything you listed.
    -Schedule meetings, send NOMs, remind parents and staff members of meetings
    -Administer, write the report, and explaining all formal academic testing for Tris and Initials (in a previous district, the psychs did this, here the psychs only do cognitive and I'm in charge of everything else)
    -Attend all RtI meetings, give suggestions for interventions, and many times end up being the "bad guy" explaining why the kid doesn't qualify for sped testing
    -Get information from classroom teachers for present levels for all IEPs (which is like pulling teeth with most of our teachers)
    -Write behavior plans (I do formal ones for IEPs with the psych, but for kids not labeled ED, I'm in charge of anything they need for the classroom)
    -Complete classroom observations for evaluation reports
    -Complete RtI summaries, attach progress monitoring graphs and explain graphs for initials
    -Respond to severe behavior issues (to be fair, they do call the psych first, but if she is not available or needs help, I'm next in line, and no one cares if it's my lunch/planning or I have kids)
    -Case manage all of my students- if they have academic hours, I'm automatically the case manager. I'm also case manager for ED kids even if they don't have academic needs because they psych can't be on an IEP alone.
    -Additional paperwork after each IEP meeting (IEP checklist ensuring everything is done correctly and a fact sheet with all of the most important information on each kid for the district, plus getting all of the necessary information about the new IEP to the classroom teacher)

    I'm sure there are things I'm forgetting. And yes, I definitely have mod/severe kids on my caseload. If they're truly severe, they do get moved, but it takes months and 234322 hoops that I have to jump through first. I had a K student at the beginning of the year that was nonverbal, not potty trained, and essentially at the level of a 1 year old. He was moved in late November, basically after my director told the severe needs program to get their act together and accept him right away. The moderate kids closer to the severe spectrum tend to stay until at least 3rd-4th grade, and then we may get them moved, again if we jump through all of the hoops and do all of the paperwork.
     
  4. LisaLisa

    LisaLisa Companion

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    Feb 23, 2015

    Yes. Yes. Yes.
    In the beginning we could assign some paperwork tasks to aides to do. Nothing too formal, just the busywork including addressing and stuffing envelopes, making copies, filing, etc. Now I do it all. I don't have a big caseload so it's fine but I imagine some teachers still delegate this type of work to someone else.
    I'm wondering who else would do it in another district?
    One issue is the matter of confidentiality, seeing addresses and personal information on forms.
     
  5. 16lp

    16lp Rookie

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    Feb 23, 2015

    About half of the people I'm in class with have a secretary at their school site that schedules all meetings, sets up assessment plans, sends home the plans,, meeting notices, final IEP's, handles getting all the signatures, etc. You just show up to the meeting. :wow:
     
  6. teachsph2008

    teachsph2008 Companion

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    Feb 23, 2015

    We don't do any formal testing. That's the job of diagnosticians.
     
  7. karebear76

    karebear76 Habitué

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    Feb 24, 2015

    As a teacher, my responsibility is writing IEP goals and monitoring the progress. Part of that is to schedule the meeting, invite required team members, document attempted contacts, facilitate the meeting, and track down/reschedule no shows. I then have to distribute copies as needed and file original. Regarding evaluations, our school counselor is responsible for collaborating with psychologist to set meeting dates, then she does invitations, facilitates the planning meetings, does all follow up or rescheduling. The psych does all formal assessments, regular ed teacher has to provide classroom based, intervention specialist provides data from interventions. I just have to attend and share my part. I currently am filling in for the counselor, so I do all of that. I have a sub in my classroom handling the academics. I couldn't imagine doing it all. No wonder we lose special ed teachers so quickly! I would burn out and find another profession.
     
  8. 16lp

    16lp Rookie

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    Feb 24, 2015

    Yeah, top that with being in school full time for my credential and 4 kids and I'm feeling rather beat.
     

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