What does your Inclusion teacher do?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by AnonyMS, Mar 24, 2011.

  1. AnonyMS

    AnonyMS SpEd Para! BASE room aide! RTI Facilitator!

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    Mar 24, 2011

    I teach middle school English/Reading (but just 6th grade). For two classes, I have a co-teacher (Special Ed. Inclusion Teacher). I struggle with what the co-teacher is really supposed to DO in the room. I know they monitor the SPED students (without being obvious... which means they cruise around and offer assistance to anyone who needs it). My struggle is that my co-teacher's native language is (I forgot what it is) and the accent is very strong. So strong that the students do sometimes have a hard time understanding the co-teacher (as do I, at times).

    Besides monitoring, what else does your Inclusion teacher do?

    I cannot send the teacher out of the room with students, the teacher must remain in the room.
     
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  3. MATgrad

    MATgrad Groupie

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    Mar 24, 2011

    As this is a co-teaching situation, you guys should be teaching TOGETHER, planning together, deciding which students will need what accommodations together. I'm not trying to insult you on the whole together thing but my inclusion teachers often complain that they feel like glorified paras because they aren't involved in any of the decision-making for the class. The inclusion teacher should also be keeping the paperwork for IEP goal documentation.
     
  4. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Mar 24, 2011

    Has she asked to be involved in whole group instruction? She should be asking to be included in the whole group instruction if that's what she feels would be helpful. As the inclusion teacher, it would be her responsibility to take the lead on implementing the child's IEP in the classroom when she's there. If she feels like she doesn't need to doing whole group instruction, then I would expect her to be doing something directly related to the IEP, with the kind of "monitoring" she appears to be doing kept at a minimum. If the inclusion teacher spends so little time with the target children out of fear of singling them out, the inclusion model will be extremely inefficient and likely not provide much, if any assistance, to the children actually receiving services. I'm not saying there would be no value added, but resources could certainly be more well spent, in my opinion.
     
  5. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Mar 24, 2011

    I second this. My dad works in a co-teaching/full inclusion school, and his principal says that when he walks in the room he should not be able to tell which is the regular ed. teacher and which is the special ed. teacher. The inclusion teacher is a highly qualified teacher- they should not just be walking around helping students like a para or even pulling them aside to help them with assignments. I'm sure someone is going to jump in here and say "but I offered to let my inclusion teacher teach/plan and she said no!" That's an entirely different situation...as far as what it should look like, both teachers should have equal say in planning and teaching.

    I student taught/did field experiences in several full inclusion schools and I always felt like a para. I was only allowed to walk around and help kids or maybe pull them to the back of the room to help them complete an assignment. I was bored out of my skull and my skills were definitely being wasted! I do all pull-out now and I love it. There has been talk of me getting a para for next year- I told my principal I would love to have one so I can send her into general ed. classrooms to assist the kids and then I can just do all of the pull out lessons. She thought that was a great idea- I can't imagine that so many schools will continue to pay full time salaried teachers to basically do the job of paras.
     
  6. AnonyMS

    AnonyMS SpEd Para! BASE room aide! RTI Facilitator!

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    Mar 24, 2011

    Yes, I agree that anyone who comes in the room should not be able to tell who is the reg. ed. teacher and who is the sped. teacher.

    I am looking for ideas on how to best use the Inclusion teacher so that they are NOT doing the job of a para.

    As far as planning together, we do not have a common planning period.

    An example of my struggle - the co-teacher came to me and offered to do spelling tests by reading the spelling words out loud for the students to write (traditional test). I struggle with this b/c the teacher's accent is SO thick that the students really would have a hard time knowing what word is being said aloud. I'm not sure how the teacher didn't realize this. (btw, we are not doing spelling that way)
     
  7. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Mar 25, 2011

    The accent is hard, but the teacher should be teaching. You could try letting the inclusion teacher give a spelling test....it might not be as bad as you think....

    When I was an inclusion teacher in LA/Lit, I would help set up the stations for the students. I planned for three and the regular education teacher planned for three and then we emailed plans back and forth. I always taught grammar each day and she always taught the reading portion of the class on Mondays and Friday (we used centers the other days so we both taught).
     
  8. karebear76

    karebear76 Habitué

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    Mar 25, 2011

    I am the inclusion specialist for one period a day for math. I mainly do as you describe. I walk around and assist the students. There's no secret who I'm helping. Just can't help it. They all know. I also modify assignments and tests as needed. For example, there is a weekly bulletin board quiz. Students review 20 different concepts daily, then the teacher orally chooses 10 for a quiz on Friday. Students have 10 minutes at most to complete this. Students with IEPs cannot do it orally, or in that time frame. So, I take notes and then create a paper quiz with 10 of the skills of my choosing and students can visualize it without the difficulties of tracking and copying and speed.

    I don't co-plan b/c I feel ackward doing so. The reg ed teacher is departmentalized so by the time I arrive, she has taught the same lesson to three classes. She just does the same thing all day long. So much for differentiation, huh?

    I pull students to read tests orally. I occasionally help reg ed students when they have a question. I taught one day when the teacher had a substitute, but I was following her sub plans, not my own.
     
  9. etcetera

    etcetera Rookie

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    Apr 1, 2011

    Hi, I am a special education teacher in a co-teaching classroom. Here are a couple of different ways I have co-taught.
    1. You could try station teaching: Divide your students into 3 groups (not ability based-but I won't go into all that now-just the basics)-you take a group, co-teacher takes a group, and an independent station. Set a timer and rotate every 2o minutes (ex. At second grade level-I might teach vocab, general ed might have a guided reading group and the independent station might be reading independently or listening to reading on the computer, etc.) This for me is the easiest way to begin co-teaching with someone new.
    2. Currently we are doing a combination of things which is fun and the best co-teaching I have ever done-but it would be really hard with a new partner. We also have a lot of pre-service teachers from the local colleges which helps us do things this way. This is a second grade reading class. I start each day with a brief whole group strategy lesson scaffolded by the gen. ed teacher (she adds in rephrasing, life experiences, writes on the board while I talk, etc.). Then we break up into a combination of small group strategy groups, individual conferencing, progress monitoring and independent reading. We come back together, check-in with the students and switch roles-she does a brief strategy lesson and I scaffold. As I leave-she breaks out again and the students work as she conferences with them individually.
     

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