What does this mean to you?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by TeachCafe, May 18, 2015.

  1. TeachCafe

    TeachCafe Comrade

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    May 18, 2015

    I've began the emailing of principals in my district about open positions.

    No response until this morning with a "at this time we don't have any positions matching your skillset" but that my resume will stay on file if anything comes up. :eek:

    I'm leaving it all to the Lord because I'm doing my part but that comment took me aback.

    What's my skill set exactly? I teach in an autism unit and I'm self contained It's hella watered down and the bare bones but I teach ELA,SS, Sci and Math and we're exactly on target with the grade level Gen ed curriculum just watered down.

    I was specific in saying I wanted to expand my experience and move into general education.

    I'm EC-6 and sped EC-12 certified. IMO, I match anything but PE,Art and Music as far as a teacher at an elementary campus.

    It wasn't a "no positions" but none that match you.

    And that was the P's way of saying "well our autism unit teachers are staying so if one of them resigns I'll call you"

    Is that my first confirmation that I AM only a sped exclusive teacher? I can only do the watered down?:eek::confused::(
    We have a high sped population in the city. People move here and speficilly come to the district for our programs and a LOT don't qualify for the "sped" units and are mainstream. Can someone from a "sped unit" not have the skill sets to fit the 7 out of 24 sped/esl/etc children in a gen ed class?
     
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  3. Bunnie

    Bunnie Devotee

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    May 18, 2015

    They probably view you as a sped teacher since that's what your experience is in. I know a few teachers on here have switched from sped to gen ed but it's not the norm.

    I believe it's normal for a sped teacher to get typecasted into that role for their career in most school districts. Sorry :-(

    But keep trying it's possible.
     
  4. TeachCafe

    TeachCafe Comrade

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    May 18, 2015

    I'm still trying and keeping the faith. I know the teachers at this school and they aren't going anywhere.

    It's so disheartening because I'm in a really really good district and I feel like I've shot myself in the foot as far as the district. I can try another district and the really good ones similar to mine are hard to get into.

    I spoke to my P and HR and both said "it's your first year so it's too early to believe you're pigeonholed where you are" yet P knows I'm miserable and keeps telling me sped is where I'll be next year despite multiple openings at the school

    The amount of autistic gen ed kids at my campus is shocking and the gen ed teachers are struggling with them. I pretty much babysit. Children and paras only there for the extra money working the autism unit and this isn't me. If I stay another year I know I'll becoming a walking sped figure and not a "teacher" of anything else.
     
  5. justwanttoteach

    justwanttoteach Cohort

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    May 18, 2015

    I totally understand what you mean about being pigeonholed. I too am a sped teacher trying to get into gen Ed in my current district. I really like my district and its close to home and really don't want to leave. However, if I can't find a full-time position in my district soon...I'm going to have to.

    Getting to your question: I think the fact that they will keep your stuff on file is a good thing. It is usually cheaper to higher someone already working in n the district than to hire from the outside. It's still early. As things start to settle and the summer starts to come to an end districts typically start to have a better idea of what is or is not needed in the way of teachers. My first year, I didn't get hired until the week after school started. My sister didn't get hired until the week before school started. It happens all the time. Don't count yourself out just yet. In the meantime, apply to anything and everything. Goodluck!
     
  6. TeachCafe

    TeachCafe Comrade

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    May 18, 2015

    The whole "keep your info" sounds placating to me. I was clear as glass in my emails to them about a general ed position yet this P still said my "skill set" so I'm incapable of doing anything else? That's what that sounds like to me.

    I would think in any direction a district would want to keep it's own rather then chancing new people. I already work in the district so I'm on file, they know me AND I live in the heart of the district as in the headquarters are 20 minutes from the house. I am the district...but apparently on sped :eek:
     
  7. justwanttoteach

    justwanttoteach Cohort

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    May 18, 2015

    Unfortunately, special Ed teachers are always needed. Because this population is so challenging to teach, when districts get a hold of a good one they typically don't like to let them go...this is even more true for strong male special education teachers.

    (Not sure if your male or female)

    It might be to your benefit to go outside of your district. Go get some Gen Ed experience and then come back?

    I'm thinking that's what I'm going to have to do....(stomps feet and whines) at this point I'll teach on the moon! I just want to teach!!

    Head up friend something will happen....we have to stay positive
     
  8. ahodge79

    ahodge79 Companion

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    May 18, 2015

    My reaction to that is that it is a standard rejection trying to be polite. They could say that to anyone and don't hold your breath on them keeping your application. Keep looking :) good luck!
     
  9. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    May 18, 2015

    Some districts will give you a shot, but others are going to question your experience with a very different kind of class room. If you are teaching a watered down curriculum and "babysitting", then these could be the reasons you aren't being considered for general education positions. Do you have advanced coursework outside of SPED that would show you have invested more studies into the depth of knowledge that a general ed. teacher would be expected to possess?

    Just wondering if you are looking at the big picture.
     
  10. TeachCafe

    TeachCafe Comrade

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    May 18, 2015

    I'm an ACP so my experience is pretty much the same as most ACP candidates principals question coming from banking to dropping them in a 4th grade classroom. At least I know the logistics of a school and teaching. I'm not fully isolated in that my kids interact with their grade level peers. I have lunch duty with mine, and recess duty.

    I've run interference with general ed students. I've written kids up, had to sit in on the parent/teacher meetings with the APs, principals, general ed teachers and parents because that last write up was the 3rd strike.

    I've stayed where I am because of Obamacare and needing health insurance as a diabetic and needing a paycheck. I don't love what I do at all. I've been fortunate to have saved a lot this year to where I can survive just fine until about November and I'd rather be jobless than sign on in my current position another year. One more year WILL most likely lock me in and the only option is leaving education all together.

    Teaching is more than the MRE - most restrictive environment and I don't believe I need to just give up and bounce out of the education field yet after one year.
     
  11. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    May 18, 2015

    AR teachers do struggle with administrators seeing where the first job is going to fit with the new job in education. I have worked with AR teachers who are in SPED just to find the education job, but once they are there, it is not someplace they care to live. Other AR teachers have exceptionally strong backgrounds in subjects that are core - math and science - and they do fairly well in the job market without the SPED certification. However, I have seen some brilliant scientists who can't run a classroom - it is hard to go back and catch up on the years in the classroom. If you are talking about wanting to go into Elem. Ed., you are up against a tough crowd of competitors, sorry to say. Very well prepared teachers in this field struggle to find good jobs and the competition is fierce. It takes time to learn the routines of elementary education, and many administrators would rather invest their time into "growing their own", fluent in the culture of the school as they want it to be.

    That said, you can change the perception of who you are, but if teaching is just about the benefits, then the effort and work you would need to invest may exceed the rewards. Keep in mind that no one is ever too old to take courses, expand horizons, and seek new challenges. If you want to teach general ed classes, you need to bring something to the table that can't be found from vast numbers of young enthusiastic graduates. Only you would be qualified to find that one thing that would make you unique and valuable beyond the SPED endorsement.

    I wish I could think of better news, but I have seen similar scenarios from the viewpoint of teachers of the handicap who are technically certified to teach all grades and classes, but who lack depth of any knowledge outside of SPED, making them poor candidates for the general ed jobs in their districts. Being a jack of all trades and master of none is not great in education, IMO.

    I have taken inexpensive courses through PBS Teacherline that strengthened what I considered my perceived weaknesses, but then, I like learning and taking courses. The classes were online, could be taken for graduate credit, and ran about six weeks. Perhaps finding something like this to build up the impression that you are still eager and willing to learn more about best practices in teaching would be a way to sway administrations where you are looking.

    Although an AR teacher, I had many years subbing before being able to make the switch. I have a strong science background, love middle school students, and thought that was where I would end up. Best laid plans . . . I am in HS, but pretty much certified in everything that interests me, including elem. ed., MS certification in all subjects, SPED, science/biology K-12, and ESL. I finished a second masters last year, and still I take classes, because I feel that the day I stop learning I may as well stop teaching. This is what works for me, but may not be anything like what you would choose to do.

    Good luck. I would suggest trying some easy, inexpensive grad courses in elementary subject matter that could be used to show eagerness to excel in that field. Who knows - you might find that you hate it, so are no better off.
     
  12. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    May 18, 2015

    I want to offer a little bit of encouragement to those teachers trying to switch from SPED to general ed. I have switched back and forth several times over the last couple of decades...1st to 4th...to SPED...to 5th...to SPED...back to 4th...to SPED...to 3rd...to SPED...So,it can be done...keep the faith!
     
  13. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    May 18, 2015

    If I may ask, where did you start your journey - general ed or SPED?
     
  14. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    May 18, 2015

    Same here, although not for nearly as long. It's only been five years, going on six for me. I started in 3rd, went to sped, moved to 2nd, and will be going back to sped next year. I always thought my first job would be in sped and that I'd be stuck there, but I've lucked out in that administrators have seen me as well-rounded candidate, with some wanting me in regular ed, even when they were well-aware that I had a sped cert and interest in teaching it, and vice versa.
     
  15. TeachCafe

    TeachCafe Comrade

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    May 19, 2015


    I'm honestly not strong teaching secondary math. Honestly any math over 2nd grade. I know it but I don't know how I'd do teaching it because I'd have to reteach it to myself and I would have to have ALL summer to do that and then some.

    I like science but again teaching it on a secondary level is eh. I do think I'd be better teaching it at least biology than math.

    Middle and High School are scary to me. The only thing I'd do it Social Studies because I really love that and I did competitive cheerleading, soccer and softball to where I could be a SS/Coach teacher in any of those.

    But I'd want to teach for a few years to have my own lay of the land before tacking on the responsibility of sponsoring and/or coaching a sport
     

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