What does a prospective high school teacher need to teach? (CA)

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by learn2forget, Nov 24, 2010.

  1. learn2forget

    learn2forget New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 24, 2010

    Hello, I'm currently attending a university in California where I'm earning a BA in Liberal Studies & a minor in Geology. I'm pretty sure that I want to teach at the high school level, but don't fully understand the requirements/process to do so. I was under the impression that a degree & the appropriate test scores for the subject I want to teach would be sufficient, but am now having doubts due to some online sources. Can anyone help me out? I know I could ask administators at school, but would rather talk to actual high school teachers.
    Oh, and I want to teach Earth/planetary science, particularly because of the shortage of teachers in this field.
     
  2.  
  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,606
    Likes Received:
    2,714

    Nov 24, 2010

    You might find better information on your state's Department of Education website.

    In my state, having a college degree is not enough. You need to have a degree in the subject you want to teach. I think, but I'm not sure, that it might be part of the requirements for Highly Qualified status that you have a degree (or enough credits) in the subject area. In my state it doesn't matter what test scores you get. You need to actual college credits in the subject area.
     
  4. KateL

    KateL Habitué

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    810
    Likes Received:
    2

    Nov 24, 2010

    Yes, there are tests that you have to pass (the CBEST and CSET), but you will also need to take a one-year credential program after you finish your BA. You'll need a single-subject credential for teaching high school. Here's the website with the requirements: http://www.ctc.ca.gov/credentials/CREDS/secondary-teaching.html
     
  5. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,171

    Nov 24, 2010

    There's a workaround for CBEST: do the initials "ELM" and "EPT" mean anything to you?
     
  6. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Nov 24, 2010

    OK, I give up.

    "ELM" is a type of tree, and "EPT" means Early Pregnancy Test, though I'm not sure what either has to do with anything:lol:
     
  7. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,171

    Nov 24, 2010

    ELM is the Entry-level Math exam used for placement by many colleges, including (I think) the California State Universities, and EPT is the English Placement Test.

    In general, if people don't know the acronyms, they haven't taken the tests - but if they have taken them and did well enough, they may not need to take CBEST.
     
  8. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Nov 25, 2010

    Sorry, TG, just busting your chops a tiny little bit.

    And I agree-- I would imagine that anyone in CA who is anticipating teaching would be familiar with the acronyms.
     
  9. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,171

    Nov 25, 2010

    Those acronyms, not necessarily: they're a fact about undergrad education (pre-credential program).
     
  10. UCLACareerChngr

    UCLACareerChngr Comrade

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2005
    Messages:
    303
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 25, 2010

    good advice given above, but don't assume that earth science is an automatically needed field...science in broad areas is needed, but in my district it's more chem and physics than bio and earth science. But, certainly it's more likely than some other subjects. Good luck! You definitely need an extra year for your credential, and if you are set on it, make sure that you get any required pre-reqs out of the way too. I changed careers and needed to do a semester of pre-reqs before getting into a credential program. They were all undergrad classes, so you might be able to get those out of the way before you graduate and save yourself some hassle.
     
  11. learn2forget

    learn2forget New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 25, 2010

    teachergroupie:
    I didn't have to take the placement tests (EPT/ELM) because I had high enough results on my SAT scores to opt out. I saw on the given website that passing the CSET tests (which I've already taken one of) IS like earning a single-subject credential. The only thing I'd be missing is the in-class experience, which is where the program comes in. So is it really necessary to take these (in my case) four CSET science tests even if I'm just gonna study the field extensively in masters school & earn a degree anyways?
     
  12. UCLACareerChngr

    UCLACareerChngr Comrade

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2005
    Messages:
    303
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 25, 2010

    rather than asking us, it's always best to get it straight from the horses mouth...in this case, the state department of ed. Barring that, probably someone at your school's credential office...but science is pretty broad, and you need to make sure you have the right credentials to teach as many science subjects as possible, even though some may be outside your major area...in those cases you'd probably need to take other cset tests...each situation is different so one person's experience may not be the same as yours, make sure you get someone at the department of ed or your college to give you a solid recommendation.
     
  13. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,171

    Nov 26, 2010

    You could also try the people at your local county office of education - in particular, the credential analyst(s).

    SAT scores, even very nice ones, aren't accepted in lieu of CBEST, though EPT and ELM scores are. Do yourself a favor and please just get CBEST over with, pronto, if you haven't already done so. Scores are good forever.

    As to the rest... CSET exams (the acronym unpacks to "California Subject Examinations for Teachers") are strictly and solely about the test taker's grasp of the subject matter. For your purposes, the only way to avoid taking them is to have undergone what it pleases the CTC to call "an approved subject-matter preparation program" - and if you're not sure whether your undergrad program is one, it almost certainly isn't.

    (It sounds like you'll do best with the two general-science subtests plus whatever assortment of the four Subtests III (in biology, chemistry, geoscience, and/or physics) will get you what you want. I suspect the Subtest III + Subtest IV route is not a good path for you.)

    In contrast, credential programs as a class are post-bachelor's. They do not impart subject matter; instead, they presuppose that the aspiring science teacher (for example) already knows the science so they can focus on the theory and practice of education in California. Student teaching is certainly a part of any good credential program, but it's by no means the whole game.
     
  14. G00d d00bie

    G00d d00bie Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2010
    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 26, 2010

    Not much. Know the subject and best practices. Also look like you went through a lot of suffering in college to learn how to teach. Maybe explain how hard-wired pathways in the brain are built with increasingly spaced practice sessions.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 175 (members: 0, guests: 158, robots: 17)
test