What does a principal look for in teachers?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by meeper22, Jul 11, 2010.

  1. meeper22

    meeper22 Companion

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2009
    Messages:
    102
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 11, 2010

    I want to be able to find a teaching job but now in Florida, they have just done more lay-offs. Now I don't know how to get a better shot at a teaching job. All these other teachers will have experience and degrees.

    All I've got is a year as a substitute and the Elementary Ed. certification and a Bachelor's in Psychology with a minor in Criminal Justice. Can someone tell me what a principal looks for that would get him or her to call you up for an interview? I am planning to take the 6-12 math exam and the Professional Ed. exam. Still waiting for results of General Knowledge.

    Also, I am interested in getting an Ed.D in School Psychology but can someone tell me what a guidance counselor does on an average day and what a school psychologist does in an average day?
     
  2.  
  3. TeacherApr

    TeacherApr Groupie

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2007
    Messages:
    1,256
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jul 11, 2010

    I would think it depends on the Principal as all of them have such different expectations. However, I think generally, someone who is confident about themselves personally and professionally (or can at least fake it in an interview) is a universal thing. Also, someone who is willing to go above and beyond.
     
  4. Southern JC

    Southern JC Companion

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2007
    Messages:
    144
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jul 12, 2010

    Of the course the required certifications, but also someone who appears professional and confident. Do not doubt yourself, go into any interview believing that you are the best person for the job and work at convincing the P. Think about the possible questions you'll be asked during the interview (principals seem to have similar general questions) and also google the school or ask around to get as much information about the school. You can use this information during the interview to your advantage. Discussing things (briefly) like the school's mission statement, community activities, graduation rates, etc. will show that you are prepared and serious about the job. The principal will be impressed and it might help with the decision of choosing you.
     
  5. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2004
    Messages:
    2,974
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 12, 2010

    1) Dedication. I can tell based upon a teacher's sample lessons we ask for if they are canned or original. Do not bring in canned lessons. A lesson is not a crossword puzzle either.
    2) Something that sets you apart. Additional certifications, a knack for Special Ed. or technology. Past experience with a sport or an extra curricular. It has to be something.
    3) Content knowledge. Content Knowledge. Content Knowledge.
    4) And in this day and age I hate to say it....but lack of teaching experience because we can afford to pay you less.
     
  6. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2008
    Messages:
    2,489
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 13, 2010

    1. Based on my own experiences here in FL last year, you need to be tenacious. Don't sit around waiting for the phone to ring - chances are in FL, it's not going to. Make up a packet and drop it off at the school. True, some schools don't like that. It's also how I got my job last year.

    2. Learn everything you can about the schools you are applying to. Is it a prep school? Magnet school? School of the arts? Any particular models they are using? Get on their websites and make sure you know their philosophies.

    3. Know your content; look at the Job Search forum and check out the Interview Question thread. Practice answering interview questions with a friend.

    4.When you do land an interview, dress professionally (and I mean a suit. It's hotter than heck right now, but do it anyway).

    5. I'm a terrible interviewee, so I had a portfolio. The only thing that was ever checked out was my unit lesson plan, but I could SHOW it if I needed to.

    6. SHOW A WILLINGNESS TO LEARN. You're a new teacher - appear confident, but when the P asks you about professional development, say "Yes, please. Lots of it." Your advantage over veteran teachers is that you can be molded (I guess that's how I want to say it) to the school's philosophy and style.

    Also... I know the tests are expensive now, but have you considered taking the 6-12 Psychology? Lots of high schools have AP/IB/AICE classes in Psych.
     
  7. meeper22

    meeper22 Companion

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2009
    Messages:
    102
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 13, 2010

    Well that's one good thing to know, have a sample lesson plan.

    Psychology, thought about it somewhat. I haven't seen jobs though for a psychology teacher in high schools on the Broward website. Most schools I've been to don't even have a Psych class offered to students. I'd have to grade essays too though and I don't think I could get my personal beliefs out of the way to grade someone's paper fairly. Why I didn't pursue a career with law.

    I just figured Math would help land me a job at any school, plus with Elementary schools since some have their 4th and 5th grade classes prep for middle school by having a middle school schedule. Math is sort of more natural to me, I can understand it if it's taught to me clearly. I just feel I'd be better teaching Math than Psych.

    Didn't realize principals liked fresh teachers more than experienced teachers. That's news to me. Jobs I've applied for asked for experience and principals want someone they can mold. I just find that funny. Thanks for all of your help. I think once I see job openings, I'll go for Elementary and see what happens.
     
  8. ms.

    ms. Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2009
    Messages:
    292
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 13, 2010

    I was told I was hired based on:

    1. Classroom Management Experience

    2. Classroom Experience: While I have never taught as a contracted teacher, I have hundreds of hours of teaching/school related experience.

    3. Other: knowledge of tools to differentiate learning, communication, and research based teaching strategies.
     
  9. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Messages:
    5,471
    Likes Received:
    982

    Jul 13, 2010

    The most important thing is to learn about the school and the area where you want to work. Districts and principals look for different things. It's always going to be important to have strong classroom management skills and to know your content.

    We also want people who want to become a part of the school. We don't have a lot of turnover, and we like that. We don't want people who are just looking for a job. We want people who are willing to make a long-term committment to making our school the best it can be. We want people who can work well with others, who are flexible, and who aren't afraid to take leadership roles within the building.

    Yes, you want to sell yourself at an interview, but don't lie. WE have had a few instances of people who talked themselves up a lot, but were able to do NONE of it in the classroom. On the other hand, we've had some people who knew that they were weak or uninformed in some areas, but they were willing to work to improve in those areas. They did well.
     
  10. allisonbeth

    allisonbeth Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2005
    Messages:
    251
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 13, 2010

    We always look out for someone who knows and loves our school (maybe an old student, a sub, a coach, a volunteer, etc). The person should indicate that she would like to work for OUR SCHOOL...either through the cover letter, an email to principal, or a quick trip to our office. When we look for someone who is new to teaching, we want someone who has shown a love of working with students (through camps, daycare, volunteer activities, etc).
     
  11. blazer

    blazer Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2009
    Messages:
    1,635
    Likes Received:
    353

    Jul 13, 2010

    If it for a shortage subject like Science, Maths, languages then a pulse is usually enough.
     
  12. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2008
    Messages:
    2,489
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 13, 2010

    Honestly, it does depend in the P. Some want experience; some want someone with no preconceived notion of what school should look like.

    How settled are you in Broward? There's a lot of openings north of you.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. TeacherNY,
  2. MissCeliaB,
  3. MrsC,
  4. Eric Matyas
Total: 509 (members: 5, guests: 481, robots: 23)
test