What do you use as behavior consequences besides taking away recess?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by waterfall, Jul 4, 2012.

  1. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    I am looking for ideas for a behavior system next year. My team told me they didn't do anything consistently across the grade level and that the previous admin was too lenient so they didn't bother sending kids to the office- there will actually be a new principal next year, so that may not be the case anymore, but I need ideas for keeping everything done in the classroom just in case. I don't typically like to use the office anyway as I feel it takes away from my authority but liked having it as an option for severe circumstances. TBH, my previous students were SO well behaved, I feel like I've lost a lot of my classroom management skills that I built up in student teaching. We did have some behavior problems in the school in general, but it just happened to be that the students in sped were the sweetest kids in the whole building. I was just thinking that for probably about 90% of the kids, I never had to even redirect/refocus them or anything (even as simple as "get back to work" or "what are we supposed to be doing right now") in two years! So I'm looking to develop something really solid that I can be consistent with. I feel like all of the "usual" consequences always get a bad rap for some reason or another (can't take away recess b/c they need to move, can't make them write b/c that makes them hate writing, can't separate them from the group b/c that takes away their learning, etc.) So what do you use that works for you? I'm not saying I'm totally against taking away recess, but I feel like that shouldn't be the only consequence for everything.
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    I'm not sure how separating a child takes away fom learning. A disruptive child in a group is compromising the others' learning...sometimes a kid just needs a little cool down and time alone until ready to do the right thing and rejoin the group.

    For me, it's about building a proactive and cooperative climate from day one....teach procedures, set expectations, create a class code of conduct together.

    Consequences should be related, relevant and allow kids to reflect upon their choices.
     
  4. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    The consequence really depends on the behavior. Most of the time, the consequence does take place during recess. I keep them in for maybe 5 minutes at most, so they still have most of their recess to run around. Just missing even a few minutes is torture for some kids!
     
  5. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    A consequence can also be practicing to do what was done wrong right. Praticing identifying feelings prior to misbehaving, practicing the right way to approach a task, etc. Consequences do not have to be just punishments.

    Depending on the problem and the child, often it is a lot faster to fix the problem then to keep "consequencing" it out of them until they figure it out on their own.

    Most practice of lacking skills should be done apart from when the student is upset. They won't be learning then because they will still be in fight or flight mode.
     
  6. janlee

    janlee Devotee

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    I have a positive learning chart where students earn stickers for completing homework, doing good deeds for others, praising their classmates, hearing from other staff members how well behaved the student or students were and completing extra credit work. If someone misbehaves or does not follow one of the classroom rules they remove a sticker from the chart, thus one less chance of winning a reward at the end of the week if their name is picked from the "positive learning pig".
     
  7. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Jul 4, 2012

    I seldom take away a child's entire recess. I save that for very serious transgressions and in those cases, the recess is usually spent in another room or the VP's office.

    What I do is keep students in for maybe a few minutes - five at the most. The amount of time depends on the degree of documented (i.e. "checkmarks") off task or disruptive behavior.

    Keep in mind that young students put a high premium on being "first." Especially when it comes to getting out to the playground. If they know that in order to do that, they need to meet certain standards of behavior and learning, even simply keeping a child back for 30 seconds can have a powerful effect. More importantly, by just taking a small part of recess, students still have time to engage in the physical activity that recess is intended to provide.
     
  8. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Jul 4, 2012

    We don't have recess, so that consequence is out for me. my classroom is set up in groups and I find it most effective to have the transgressor seat their desk away from the group.
     
  9. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    The consequence needs to be relevant to the behavior. I have my students practice certain routines if they are having a hard time following them. I encourage students to come up with a solution to the problem. I always give a chance for them to fix it before I take it to another level.
     
  10. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    We have 30 minutes recess and the most I take away is 10 minutes. First offense= lose 5 mins. recess; second offense = 10 mins. recess and note home; third offense = move seat away from rest of class; fourth offense = loss of group/fun activities; fifth offense = time out in another classroom.

    You can also take away certain privileges (like using crayons if they colored on the floor or playing with recess 'toys' if they hit someone with a ball, etc.)
     
  11. TeacherShelly

    TeacherShelly Aficionado

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    Jul 4, 2012

    :yeahthat:
    ITA
     
  12. applecore

    applecore Devotee

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    Jul 4, 2012

    No office visits allowed for us either. I run a tight ship and set the bar high for expectations and respect. If there's a student who needs some reminders, here's a few things I do that are basic and have worked for the past 3 years...and have been adapted by my team (thankfully).

    5 minute time out at recess...spent chatting with me; oh how much they really don't like spending a whole five minutes of their 15 inside talking with me! There's times when it's been like 2 minutes instead of 5...but who's counting? :)

    Sent out to the hall for a time out at the desk and chair waiting to receive a student who needs a break from me or the class; happens every year that I get a student or two who just need to be asked to leave the room and recollect their thoughts. I've actually had kids come to me and ASK to go out to the hall for a break! These are my kids who need a break from humans though...can't say I blame them. I just have to remember they're out there--not that I've forgotten anyone (on purpose).

    Last resorts are calling the counselor and the P down to have a chat with the student(s); reserved for brawling and bullying.
     
  13. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    I have been trying very hard to concentrate on positive reinforcement of good behaviors, which does help minimize the "bad" behaviors. That being said, there still need to be consequences for actions (good or bad), and that is a lesson I teach in my class. There are a number of (usually random) consequences for good behavior - I have a punch card that, once all punches are earned, grants the student the right to something from my treasure box. On hot weeks, I will often give "freeze pops" (as they leave for the day :) ) to students who have maintained an a-b average in conduct (we have to assess daily grades). I also have been known to show movies on Friday afternoon, complete with Capri Suns and popcorn, and if you had not had a good week (or in some cases a good day on Friday), you spent that time in another teacher's classroom. (We sometimes trade off when we/the student need a break.)


    I try to stick to "logical" consequences as much as possible - if you misuse crayons, you lose the privilege of having them (for a while), the same with other supplies and ESPECIALLY the computers - that's a killer for the kiddos. If I have to take away computer time, they KNOW they're in trouble. If I find that I need to take recess time away (it's usually the "little wigglers" who end up with that consequence, and they NEED to move), I usually have them run/walk the length of the playground along the fence closest to the school. That way, they get the exercise without being able to play. Just some ideas.
     
  14. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    What do you do if a student doesn't bring in homework? I didn't assign hw in my previous position, but in gen ed the policy was you had to stay in and do at recess, and probably 50% of the kids in each class had to stay in every single day, since with only a 20 minute recess it took them at least that long to finish the assignment. I don't really like that- but not sure what to do instead!

    I have been in schools were teachers were not allowed to take away recess, so I kind of wondered what you did instead in that circumstance. That wasn't mentioned to me when I went to see my grade level team, so I assume that's not the case, but we are getting a new principal so anything could change.

    I have worked in schools where kids who missed recess had to walk around a big square or line or something, and I liked that b/c they still had to move. If this isn't already in place in my school though, I don't feel like I could just tell my kids to go out there and do it and have it enforced, and I'll be honest, if I don't have recess duty, I don't want to give up my lunch to go stand outside anyway and make sure my kids are walking around the square or whatever.

    In my previous school, we actually weren't allowed to send kids in the hallway b/c they would "miss learning." In my full size room with only 4-5 kids at a time, I could send them to the back of the room and they'd still feel "separated" but in a gen ed class with 30 kids, that's not going to work.

    The only discipline problem I ever really had was a 4th grader who would occasionally pester the kids around him, and sending him to the back until he was ready to participate worked fine. Then I had a couple of 5th graders who would just goof off and I would tell them that if now wasn't a good time for them to get the assignment done, they could do at recess. If they were working the whole time and just didn't finish it, I gave them time in class. If they didn't finish it b/c they were goofing off, they had to come in and do it. I think I only had to do this about 3 times the entire year. All of my other students were angels plus they really liked being pulled out so that tended to keep them on their best behavior.

    I'm not sure if we have planners, but if we do I'm going to steal an idea from my 3rd grade CT that I liked. She had the color flip system for behavior and if kids had stayed on green the whole day, at the end of the day she went around and put a stamp in their planner. Parents knew that if there was a stamp there, they'd had no problems that day. If they didn't get a stamp, she just wrote in the reason. I'm not expecting a lot of parent support, but I think kids like the stamps either way, and it's still a good information system for the few parents that do check it.
     
  15. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Jul 4, 2012

    Requiring a student to walk up and down a line or around a square outline for all of recess seems a little....hmmmm, not sure...militant? I imagine some parents wouldn't much care for that either.

    It's always tough determing how to balance everything.
     
  16. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    It wasn't the whole recess- only 5 minutes or whatever. I liked it a lot b/c it totally negates the typical complaint which is that kids who tend to get in trouble a lot are the most "squirmy" who need the time to move at recess. I wouldn't implement it unless it was a school policy though.
     
  17. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    My students' recess is my hour duty free...I will rarely ask my lunch para to sit a kid for five minutes, but it's EXTREMELY rare...I don't give up my lunch for minor msbehaviors.
     
  18. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Oh, got it! :)
     
  19. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    I totally agree with you about not wanting to always use sending them to the office. I can't just send a child out anyways, I have to call the AP to come get them. I ONLY do that if the child is a threat to me, themselves or others.

    I know you don't like the usual "making them write" but I do use a reflection paper. It doesn't require them to write more than a few sentences. I write what they did, or my view of it. They get to explain their side of the story and list one way they might handle it better next time. Maybe have a few choices they could pick from and circle one and then draw a picture showing how they'd handle, rather than writing. But I make them do it for homework so it is a little extra homework and so that parents can see it and sign off on it. I think some of the kids like having the chance to explain what they did and why they did it.

    Also, sometimes a consequence in my class would be, oh you didn't go back to your seat and follow directions or start your work right away, so everyone is going to get a ticket, except for you. (Tickets are redeemed for prizes on Friday.) I don't say anything, but usually not getting the ticket is consequence enough. Once they see me handing them out they usually rush to get their stuff out, but by then it's too late and they don't get the ticket.

    Finally, at the end of this school year I started taking away privileges. We did a fun science project with candy, two kids sat at a table by themselves doing a work sheet that related to the topic because they lost the privilege of participating in the activity. We used plaster of paris to make volcanoes, one kid had to sit and do a worksheet about volcanoes. Sitting in the classroom and watching the other kids participate in sometime fun was a pretty big consequence. I also took away a field trip from a child in an extreme case.
     
  20. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    I started to keep two kids in that rarely did their homework. But keeping them in didn't make a difference. It wasn't like it suddenly occurred to them to start doing their homework so they wouldn't miss recess. Then it seemed pointless for me and for them. What was I going to do, keep them in EVERY single day?

    So I let it go. I had absolutely no home support from either kid's families. So instead I just made special homework sheets where I recorded each and every assignment that they missed so that I could show it to the parents at parent teacher conferences. One kid's mom never came, the other mom then started yelling at her son saying she did his homework every night with him why did he make her look like a liar? (I went through this kids' books everyday she NEVER did his homework with him.) I was pretty much at a loss of what to do, but at least I had everything on record so if at the end of the year the principal wanted to ask me why these students did poorly on state tests or didn't progress as much as other students.

    This year my co-teacher and I discussed possibly having one day a week where students would have to stay in if they missed a certain number of assignments. So for example, if you miss 1 or 2 assignments, you get a pass, a warning, etc. After 3 in a week you will have to stay in on Thursday and work on missed assignments. Whatever they get done, they get done. Same problem next week, you stay in on Thursday. That way we're not completely ignoring the fact that some students are doing it and others are not, but we don't have to give up our lunch everyday.
     
  21. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    At my GS's school, if you got your homework done, you got an extra recess on Friday. I know this because about 6 months into the school year, my GS said he got an extra recess--for the first time all year. I like this idea because it is done in a positive manner. Those students who could not get their homework done did not feel picked on. (My GS never does any homework. That is another story.)
     
  22. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    One year (I think I was teaching 3rd grade), I would catch students being good. Their number was then put into a bag. When I needed an errand run I would pull a number out of the bag. The child with that number got to run the errrand. On Fridays I would pull 3-5 (I don't remember) numbers. Those students would get to go to the prize box.

    I put numbers on poker chips.
     
  23. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    I have also been known to pick up my phone in the middle of class and make a parent call - good or bad! "Good" calls are great positive reinforcement. For my "bad" calls, the kiddos have to explain to mom/dad why "we" have called them. I try not to make too many "bad" calls, though.
     
  24. Matt633

    Matt633 Comrade

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    I use a classroom economy. We have police officers who debit someone who is breaking a class rule. Their consequence is less pay at the end of the week! I also reserve the right to debit/credit. Credits would be extra reward for doing something positive. Last year, I had to add FREE TIME to the top of the board and erased a letter when there was whole class behavior problems. Each letter was worth 5 minutes of free-time Friday time.
     
  25. Toast

    Toast Companion

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    Jul 7, 2012

    I too dislike taking away recess because I feel I need my lunch break to be more productive in the afternoon. As selfish as it sounds, I need a break and when I take away recess, I am actually punishing myself!

    Some consequences I have assigned for certain actions include:

    1. Little pumpkin colored on carpet in expo marker:

    He spent fun Friday wiping down the classroom with unscented baby wipes instead of doing PAT time.

    2. No homework:

    Last in line to lunch, classroom job taken away for a week, name taken out of bucket to be picked for the coveted silent reading books in my classroom (Wimpy Kid, 39 Clues, etc)

    3. Disruptive in class?

    Instead of participating in fun project, Little Pumpkin got to read articles about said topic instead.

    Also, when a kid is chatty during class, often all I have to do is stop what I am doing, stand very still and give him/her an emotionless bored look. I won't even say anything or act mad, I will just stand and wait with the bored look. I usually let it last about 30 seconds to make sure they are a little uncomfortable under the attention. 9 times out of 10 it works and I don't have to do anything else.


    4. Disruptive in computer lab?

    Little pumpkin can read about using a computer instead of actually using it.

    I have also had students work on missing work and over due homework during computer lab time too instead of getting to use a computer.
     
  26. leighbball

    leighbball Virtuoso

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    I agree!
     
  27. Lotte

    Lotte Companion

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    Jul 9, 2012

    Taking away recess time is not something I would do at all, as the kids who end up doing things they shouldn't often really need to vent ouside to be able to focus inside.

    It all depends on the behaviour. I don't use the office either as they're not strict enough to be able to keep the kids from doing it again.

    --I say I expect better from them and that I'm really disappointed with their behavior. -That it'll be difficult to trust them later on if they behave badly, which in turn will prevent me from doing fun things with them.
    --They might not get free play.
    --If there's a problem between two students, they'll be taken to another room to talk through their issues
    --They might excuse themselves in writing.
    --They might sit at their desk, resting their head in their arms untill they're ready to join the rest of the group (They will be asked several times to please come and join and that we miss them in our group -if we're meeting on the carpet)
    --They will have a chance to explain themselves to a teacher, and off course say sorry.
    --If it's several kids misbehaving we'll do secret friends to try to focus on positive behaviors. (The no-cost version where good behaviors are them means of showing friendship -money must not be spent)
    --The class might be motivated by the chance to earn a popcorn party for good behavior? (Which will never take place more than max 3 times in a year) Using food as incentive is something I really try to avoid but a popcorn party once each semester is as far as I'll go.(absolutely no cakes or candy!)
    --Usually positive reinforcements work really well. Or some sort of system like marbles where the kids earn a special thing in the end; extra play time, hiking trip, extra computer time or (If it was on the plan anyway..) a movie.
    --This year I'll try the 100 chart, as explained on Pinterest (-draw a number and color it in on the chart if the kids behave. 10 colored spaces in a row might give a small prize like 10 minutes extra recess, or they might save up to bigger prizes -but again- all prices are cost free.
    --They might call their parents and explain what they did (in front of me, off course) for severe things and if they continue, the kids will be called to a meeting with their parents and me.

    I think it's important to set the tone of behavior management early on in the year. If you want to give the kids pencils, erasers, candy, cakes and other things you pay for, that's up to you, but if you from the beginning don't do that, but instead keep prizes at a no cost level, like opportunity to
    -draw
    -free write
    -sudoku/crosswords
    -extra recess (you watch them)
    -extra computer time
    -reading a book they love
    -free play
    -being able to sit next to a friend of their choice for one lesson
    -watch a movie (one that has to do with the topic)
    -go for a walk in the neighbourhood
    -bring in their favorite music to listen to..
    :2cents: this is a very good option too! ​
     

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