What do you think?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by tuankiet153, May 31, 2020.

?

Do you agree?

Poll closed Jun 7, 2020.
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  1. tuankiet153

    tuankiet153 Rookie

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    May 31, 2020

    It seems too much easy to be a teacher in the U.S, especially Texas. No matter what subject and what school you graduated from as long as you hold a bachelor degree and pass the state test, "boom" you are a certified teacher. I am not going against all. I know a lot of people whose major is not mathematics but their proficiency in math better than who majors in math. But at least you have minimum required credits in math to be eligible for a math teacher position. Assuming that you have a child who is in middle school now, one day you figure out that his/her teacher cannot answer his/her questions, and after an investigation you find out his/her teacher held a bachelor degree which is not math, but something else. What do you think? Do you expect your child to be taught by a qualified math teacher or disqualified math teacher? Ex: In my country, in order to be a qualified math teacher, you have to hold at least a bachelor degree in mathematics. If you hold a bachelor degree in mathematics, you are not qualified for physics teacher positions. You are ONLY qualified for a position in which you major.
     
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  3. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Jun 1, 2020

    This information is not correct. If you hold a bachelor's degree in say, psychology, there is no one state test you can take to become an elementary school, middle school, or high school teacher in Texas. I can provide you with the links to credentialing in Texas to prove that.

    Your information, and therefore your point, are specious.

    If you are going to knock the US education system or the credentialing process in Texas (or any state,) at least make sure you have your facts correct!
     
  4. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Phenom

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    Jun 1, 2020

    Looks like Rainstorm made it rain facts!

    [​IMG]
     
  5. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Phenom

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    Jun 1, 2020

    I just have to say that you are far from the truth with regards to the American educational system in the US. I had to get a Bachelors degree and Masters degree in Math, I had to pass the California Basic Skills Test (CBEST), the Single Subject Subtests for Math [CSET’s: I (Algebra and Number Theory), II (Geometry and Probability and Statistics), and III (Calculus and History of Math)], the Praxis 5161, Preliminary Technology Subtests I and II (which covers educational law as it pertains to accessible use of technology in the classroom and how I can assess which technological tools/aids are appropriate), and the US Constitution exam. I also had to enroll in a 1-year teaching credential program and taught full-time in said program. I had to observe a credentialed math teacher for 72 hours (so 87 50-minute classes in total) in which I had to write copious amounts of notes for things such as the seating arrangement of students, how students were grouped depending on the activity, things the teacher and students said, the different teaching strategies that were used, the layout of the classroom, how the teacher differentiated instruction, how the teacher handled classroom management, etc.

    I then had to enroll in what was formerly known as BTSA (now called Induction) to clear my Preliminary credential, which was yet another year of essentially the same thing, just online and in person at the local district office and school district.

    What’s more, I have to do professional development every other year at the bare minimum and am nearing a Masters + 45 by this summer’s end.

    I teach and have taught (regular core and/or advanced): Prealgebra, Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2, Financial Algebra (Applied Math), Trigonometry, Statistics, AP Statistics, Precalculus Honors, AP Calculus AB, AP Calculus BC, and Calc 3. This coming year I will be exclusively teaching AP Calc BC and Calc 3/Linear Algebra at the high school level.

    That being said, math programs in CA are *quite* rigorous, at least at the high school level, even for people who don’t have math degrees as applicants are required to take several math courses AND numerous math certification exams at the bare minimum.

    Know the facts before making sweeping statements.
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2020
    Linguist92021 likes this.
  6. CherryOak

    CherryOak Companion

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    Jun 1, 2020

    Yes and no. I actually like a system that affords options. I am certified in middle math via testing/add-on, not coursework. I would have gone for the 5161 if I liked high school, but I don't. I like the option to test into other fields as long as the passing score is held high and requires knowledge well beyond the level being taught. People are capable of learning or already knowing content without college courses. In the end, as long as the test min is high enough for someone passing to not get the question wrong, I think it's fine to offer options. Content is but one piece of the puzzle.
     
    a2z likes this.
  7. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    Jun 4, 2020

    Yeah, I would love to know where this guy got his information. Some disgruntled parent probably was ranting about "unqualified" teachers and now they're on a rampage about how easy teachers have it :roll:
     
    futuremathsprof likes this.

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