What do you think of five-year programs that include a Master's Degree?

Discussion in 'General Education Archives' started by 1stferg, Oct 12, 2005.

  1. 1stferg

    1stferg Comrade

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    Oct 12, 2005

    I just read the post for on-line degrees and I started thinking about the five-year degees.

    I don't know how common they are but our local university has offered a five-year degree in education that includes the Master's Degree. The kids never really get a BA or BS. The classes they take in the first four years are a lot like what I took for my undergrad. However they spend a lot more time in the public school. The fifth year is student teaching for one semester and classes and "relieving teachers for meetings and testing etc" for the other semester. I can't remember what you call it. The regular teacher is still in the building but the student teacher is in charge of the classroom while the reg. teacher is at a meeting, training, staff dev., testing kids or something else. It is supposed to give the student teacher more time alone with the class.

    Then they graduate with a Master's in Education but they have very little independent teaching experience.
     
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  3. dmmiller360

    dmmiller360 Rookie

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    Oct 13, 2005

    HI, I'm not a teacher, in school right now to become a teacher in VA. In the schools here that offer a five year program where you get a Masters, you also earn a bachelors in your program (most of early education K-6) as well, you just do another year past your bachelors and end up with a Masters. They are full-time programs (where you take a full load of Master level classes). I have not seen any where you do not have class work involved at the Masters level (I'm not sure if that was what you were saying, that the program your talking about is just more practical and no further college, Master level, classes?). Maybe it's different in West VA then in VA.

    I can't really comment on what I think about it, I'm not in the program, and if I decide to get my Masters will take the traditional route and go part-time while working (going part time now). Just wanted to let you know how it works here in Virginia.

    Debra
     
  4. smilesjd

    smilesjd Rookie

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    Oct 13, 2005

    I would have loved to take a program like that and be done all at once! It sounds like an interesting program, BUT i never would have taken it. Around here they will not hire you if you already have a masters degree, you'd be to expensive. Also, it takes away from being a "life long learner." They like to see you teach and go part time for your masters.
     
  5. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    Oct 13, 2005

    Comparing my BME/BSE degree with the 5 year Masters offered at the University in the next town, I'm glad I did my track. Lot's of schools are more comfortable hiring 0 experienced teachers with a bachelors degree than a masters degree. It's all about money. Talking with the students over from the other school, I felt more prepared for the classroom. Then again it could have been the type of education I recieved.
     
  6. Carmen13

    Carmen13 Groupie

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    Oct 18, 2005

    Over here, a teaching degree for grades 7-12 is 5 years, and it includes a final thesis-monograph. A MS degree is generally 2 years and a PhD is 4 years.
    Things will change though. I don't regret having studying 5 years to graduate to be a teacher, because I feel confident and prepared in the subject I teach. What I regret is the teacher's unemployment over here being high, and some unfair things going on in the education system, but not worth to mention...
     
  7. happybird

    happybird Rookie

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    Oct 18, 2005

    My University

    At my university (N. California), you go for 4 years and get your B.A. (99% of us that want to teach elementary school- up to 6th- are a diversified major (focus early elementary). Then the last year (grad student) is 1/2 a year of student teaching (2 8-week placements at different grade levels, I think we solo teach 4 weeks in each- not positive). Then the other 1/2 of the year is grad classes, formation of a thesis, etc. Throughout the 5 years (starting in freshman fall) there are fieldwork requirements
     
  8. sdhudgins

    sdhudgins Comrade

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    Oct 18, 2005

    SHEESH the program I went through was 4 1/2 for a BA.. I would've LOVED to get a masters for only a semester more!!!
     
  9. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    Oct 19, 2005

    Interesting. I went through two programs in 5 1/2 years, but that was because of other circumstances. My BSE was a 4 year program and my BME was a 4 1/2 year program. I'm trying to get into a college that offers a masters in the area I want but I'm getting the run around. This is a college that normally does a 5 year track. I'm getting pretty frustrated with them.
     
  10. Miss Jana

    Miss Jana Rookie

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    Oct 19, 2005

    I know this isn't exactly what you are talking about, but I'm in a Master's Degree program here in Texas right now. It's a special one called Masters of Arts in Teaching. As long as you have the requirements to get in, they will accept any prior Bachelor's Degree. I personally had an undergrad degree in Early Childhood Education, but some people are coming in from business and other disciplines. I'm sure it's extremely difficult for them in this program if they haven't had a lot of exposure to child development, or the way schools work. I'm thankful I had the degree I had before getting into this program, it's made it a lot easier.

    We have several practicums in the classroom in each semester, and we are required to do a semester of student teaching, or a year of internship at a school.

    The only thing that's hard for me is that many of the classes are online. Even though they require high participation in online group discussion, I don't care for being out of the classroom. Online learning is in it's infancy right now, so hopefully, it'll just get better and better. It's the wave of the future, so it's not going away. I'm an auditory learner, so you can imagine it's difficult having to research material where I have to read most everything, and not get a chance to hear instruction, or talk with people. But I tape record my readings, and dictate notes and that helps a lot. Being in the school classroom observing and participating is the best part and teaches me the most as far as practical teaching goes.

    Thanks for listening to my share,
    Jana
     
  11. 1stferg

    1stferg Comrade

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    Oct 20, 2005

    It is interesting to see the variety of options available. Being stuck in my own little corner of the world I did not realize there were so many ways to arrive at the same place, that being teaching in your own classroom. Thanks for sharing!
     

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