What do you guys think of this?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Shanoo, Oct 20, 2011.

  1. Shanoo

    Shanoo Habitué

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    Oct 20, 2011

    I have a student in my room who is very disruptive. On top of that, he's confrontational, argumentative, and lacks the ability to take responsibility for his actions. When asked to stop doing something disruptive (repeatedly singing the jingle for an applesauce commercial, for example), he argues that he wasn't doing anything wrong, says that I'm not being fair, and then escalates the behaviour. This is an all day (or period) every day kind of thing. I looked in his file and this is not new - it's something that has been going on for years. And, yes, he has been evaluated.

    It all came to a head the day before yesterday when he was continuously disruptive. After numerous (too many, even) warnings, I told him that I needed him to work in the hall. He refused. An "arguement" ensued (me repeating that he needed to work in the hall and the reasons why, him coming up with every excuse in the book as to why it was unfair, he didn't do anything wrong, etc.). To make a long story short, putting him in the hall didn't stop the behaviour and when I called the office to let them know he would be on his way, he picked up a chair and threw it against the wall, screaming bloody murder. Someone in the office came to get him.

    I'm at the point where I don't know what to do with the situation. I've tried all of the suggestions in his file to no success. Yesterday was touchy because I didn't know how to react to him. I was able to reflect and this is what I've come up with. Any advice, comments or suggestions would be greatly appreciated:

    I've noticed that his behaviours escalate when he has an audience. Talking to him one on one is...not great, but ok. So, I've decided to ignore all but his major behaviours. Today, for example, he talked, sang, made noise, tried to have me catch him using his cell phone, etc. And I ignored them. He was given a warning for yelling "I love b**bies" during my instruction and he was asked to stay in his seat twice and to lower his voice 3 times. For the other incidents, I focused more on his peers. When he did something distracting and his friend turned around to watch, I reminded his friend to stay on task. When he made a noise another student tried to copy him, I gave the other student a warning. When he told inappropriate jokes and the students laughed, I told them they needed to quiet down. By the end of the class, for the most part, the others were staying on task and he was alone at the back of the room making weird noises for no one but himself. At the end of class, I pulled him aside and told him that he was being placed on the next level of our school's behaviour policy for his disruptive behaviours. He nodded, said ok, and left the room.

    My hope is that if I'm consistent enough with the other students, they will quickly lose interest in his actions, thereby getting rid of his audience and, hopefully, his behaviours will simmer down.

    What do you guys think? I really am at the end of my rope here.
     
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  3. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Oct 20, 2011

    That's a very effective technique and I'm pretty sure it's recognized as an established, acceptable way of dealing with such behavior. You are basically eliminating the opportunity for him to get negative attention.

    Now's the time to move in with positve attention.
     
  4. Shanoo

    Shanoo Habitué

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    Oct 20, 2011

    Really? Even if his attempted disruptions are really, really disruptive and loud? It's hard because one the one hand, I KNOW he's doing it for my reaction, but on the other hand, I'm scared that someone is going to see it as me having no control.
     
  5. Ms.SLS

    Ms.SLS Cohort

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    Oct 20, 2011

    I've got a similar student, and have been trying the same thing with him. So far its been working so-so...
     
  6. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Oct 20, 2011

    If he has been evaluated, what information does that give? There are many strategies to shape behavior but a lot depends on the why. He may also need specific types of strategies or more support and services than he is currently receiving.
     
  7. sunbeachgirl

    sunbeachgirl Rookie

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    Oct 20, 2011

    I am in an almost identical situation. My student refuses to do ANY work. Some days he will sit there and not do anything but sleep. I let him because at least he's not bothering the others in my class.
    A few days ago I pushed a little too hard...trying to get him to work and he blew up at me. He started swearing and saying horrible things to me. I don't understand how the school can sit by and let this happen continually while the student doesn't get any educational benefit.
     
  8. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    Oct 21, 2011

    Kudos to your continued attempts to work with this child and find a way to minimize his actions and disruptions. It sounds like you may have found a good strategy for removing the reward he gets from other students for his behavior.

    Still, I would have a hard time myself dealing with his continued interruptions.

    One thing to realize is that his actions are, in large part, a learned behavior. He has gotten away with doing this throughout school and has learned how to argue with the teacher when any consequences are threatened or actually given out. We had a student in our school last year that was very similar and most of the teachers tried to take the same general approach you are using. I, however, had a different approach since I didn't have the student on a regular basis.

    First things first....I am the authority (or "boss") in the room...not him. I don't care if you like or agree with what I tell you to do, you will still do it - period. No argument. No discussion. With your student, I would probably give the assignment each day, then send him straight to the hallway since he isn't going to do any work anyway. Yes, he is going to act even more outrageously - at first - when you do this, because you've taken his audience away completely. But you have to try to weather the storm. It's much like having your own child sleep in their own room for the first time. Of course they are going to cry loudly and yell for you, until they realize that won't get them what they want. You can go in the room to comfort your child and assure them you are still there, but then remind them they WILL be sleeping in their room. The same with this kid. You can check on him to see how he's doing on the assignment and let him know he can return to the room when he completes the work and/or improves his behavior. Until then, he will stay in the hallway (or a room in the office if he is too disruptive in the hall).

    When he says "That's not fair, I didn't do anything wrong", DO NOT ARGUE WITH HIM! Do not even honor his outburst with a response. He KNOWS what he is doing and he does know it is wrong, but he has learned he can argue about it and get away with it. So don't even give him a chance to argue with you. Just remove him from the room and allow him back in when he decides to act right.

    Of course, this will also require the cooperation and support of admin, since you may have to send him down to the office and you both need to agree on how his behavior will be handled ahead of time. Unless you are both on the same page, you will be better off handling the situation yourself.
     
  9. Shanoo

    Shanoo Habitué

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    Oct 21, 2011

    The evaluation was done a few years ago and it said that he was acting out because he was bored. That he needed more challenging work.

    Well, I stayed up last night and came up with a project for him that involved mapping, writing and breaking codes, etc. I gave it to him today in class, he looked at it and tossed the duo-tang on the floor. Fine. Whatever. It only took me 2 hours to make. No biggie.

    Class started out ok. While we were correcting homework, he was relatively quiet and participated somewhat. When it came time to do some actual work, it hit the fan. I kept up with my strategy from yesterday and the other kids really seem to be benefitting from it. He, however, is on to me. He stood up in class today and loudly asked if anyone "actually likes the NBA". A few of the boys turned around to answer him (he sits in the back of the room) and I quickly asked them to turn around and get back to work. The student looked at me, then went to the front of the room to ask again, thereby getting rid of the need for his friends to turn around and get in trouble.

    At the end of class, I asked to speak with him and told him that, as per our school's behaviour plan, due to the disruptions he caused today, he would be serving detention with me on Monday at lunch. He lost it, told me it wasn't fair, said that he just wasn't going to come and aggressively pushed a desk on his way out the door.

    We've got a parent meeting coming up next week. We'll see what comes of that.
     
  10. Learner4Life

    Learner4Life Cohort

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    Oct 21, 2011

    This here is key! I have the exact same type of student but I have been told that he is to stay in my room unless he is a danger to other students. He isn't to be placed in the hallway because he has a tenancy to run. It's been a blast.
    My only strategy that has worked sometimes (and only sometimes) is to find what he likes to do that is quiet (my kiddo likes to draw) and that's what I let him do. As long as he is quiet and not disrupting the other students who want to learn then that's fine. On days when he wants to cooperate and learn something, I'll help him and I'll grade what I get.
    It doesn't a line with a single teaching principle I have and it really drives me crazy, but I can only teach those that want to learn and hopefully he's absorbing something!!!
     
  11. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

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    Oct 22, 2011

    This child needs help. He is a constant disruption and he is making it impossible for other students to learn. Sit down with admin. and ask them to please come observe. Then you are going to have to write this student up and document these behaviors. If you receive no help, Texas has a refusal to teach law that you can use. Since this child is absolutely bullying you and the other students, making your blood pressure rise everyday and not allowing other students to learn, you must take action. He definitely needs help. He cannot continue on this path because he is hurting not only himself but the others around him. To allow him to continue with this behavior only makes him feel that this is acceptable in his world and in society. It is not acceptable. He needs more help than you are able to provide. You have to start the documentation process so that this child can be in a classroom where he is able to get the help that he needs to be successful in life. Good luck! I feel for you! I really do. Been there. Done that. It is a tough, tough road to be on. You feel mentally beat down everyday and the kids in the class feel like they have weathered this storm everyday. Some of the kids are afraid not to look at the kid for fear the kid might lash out at them. It is tough. Documentation and stating the facts, having others observe, having him removed from the class when he has outbursts that distract the class will be your only way to deal with this so that others understand how disruptive behavior is affecting the other students and your ability to teach. Do other teachers have these same problems with this student? How are they coping???
     
  12. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Oct 22, 2011

    Document everything that you can! And keep having meetings with the school social worker and the administration. They need to be involved.

    If you notice that the student is becoming disruptive, can you get him to the office or somewhere else in a nice way? Maybe have him bring a note to the principal or another teacher, just to get him a little break. Of course, let the office know he's coming to watch for him.

    Can he work to earn something by showing good behaviors? Even if it is only 15 minutes of work and then a reward.

    When he is working appropriately, throw on the positives. He needs them!
     
  13. blazer

    blazer Connoisseur

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    Oct 22, 2011

    Whilst there will be a reason why this child acts up the kids I always feel sorry for are the ones who have to share a classroom with him all day, everyday, every week, every year. Not only will this child absorb more than the average amount of school resources trying to educate/control him he will also blight the educational opportunities of those kids unlucky enough to have to share his space throughout their education. Are you his only teacher or are we talking highschool where he will see lots of different teachers? If the latter then you should all get together with your school Special ed specialist and come up with some consistant strategies and sanctions. Not just for his sake but for the other kids' and yours!

    Alternativly are you allowed to use tazers?:eek:
     
  14. iloveschool

    iloveschool Companion

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    Oct 22, 2011

    His only diagnosis is boredom? I would not be happy if my child was a student in your class and was not able to learn because he was given a million chances. Also- how do other students see this situation. I would guess as not fair. They are getting in trouble for the same actions and he gets away with it. The admin should be more supportive of you!!! You have went above the call of duty!
     
  15. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

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    Oct 22, 2011

    Ha Ha tazers.... funny. But probably a career ender.... in many ways.:)
     
  16. Thenew

    Thenew New Member

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    Oct 25, 2011

    Sounds like you might, might need to open this out to the wider school community. It's in the file, you've tried different techniques, the school office knows about it. Try not to be worried about what other teachers or students will think of your techniques. The students (we all know) get that he is not showing appropriate behaviour, the office knows and if you bring it up at a staff meeting, the teachers will know and your work will not be judged by others. you are trying where others (it seems) have failed. Do what you can, remove that negative reinforcement and start with the positive.

    Sounds a bit like you need some support at school, and some parental support at home to make sure that the student has a fully supported system at home, school and in the community.

    Ask your teachers and friends for help and support while you attempt something new. Maybe the student needs a one-on-one classes for a period of time.

    KEEP ON DOING THE BEST YOU CAN!

    We are here to help you hold on to the end of your rope..or tether, whichever you prefer.
     
  17. teacher girl

    teacher girl Comrade

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    Oct 25, 2011

    Hugs *

    I totally sympathize with your situation. Even though, I'm not a teacher yet, I am an aide. And I was once in a classroom with a child with similar behavior. I was placed in the clasroom to manage the child's behavior. I had a very rough time working with him, but patience is a virtue and not getting frustrated or angry, even though he pressed my buttons. BUt i've found that some stuff works.

    Don't argue with him ( I know it's hard not to, but it's what he wants you to do so you can get frustrated and off track)-- Let him argue by himself. When he starts to argue cut the conversation off. Simply repeat your directions of him. If he starts to argue, ignore it, don't say anything just continue helping another student, working on papers, etc. NEver let him see you get frustrated. That is his goal. Tell the other children to ignore his bad behavior and praise the kids that are ignoring him. But once he argues stop talking to him. It will frustrate him that you aren't listening to him-- by arguing you are listening to him- Don't argue just ignore him when he argues and encourage the other kids to ignore him as well.


    Have a behavioral system--- LIke if he acts bad make him change his color, or write his name on the board tell him he has 3 strikes and he gets a referral or something-- It has to be something where he can track his own behavior so he understands when he is skating on thin ice. So when you write the referral, he will be mad, but it will be fair like you said 3 strikes your out. SO when talking to his parents they will be more understanding because it will seem fair versus you saying I got angry and wrote him up.

    Turn his peers against him. Like if everyone is going outside at the end of the day for recess and he keeps singing and being disruptive-- SAY-- I am not taking you guys outside because Jimmy won't be quiet. I'm sorry guys.... I wish Jimmy would stop so you guys can have fun. They will gt mad and not think he is cool anymore. Or if you guys have cupcakes or something- say the whole class has to be good to get them and punish the whole class when he acts bad. He seems like he feeds off his peers opinions... so use them to control him. They will get mad and his bad behavior will be awkward, not funny anymore.


    Record everything that he does, ( for his parents/adminsitration/ etc. ) No one will believe he is a terror unless you have documented proof.

    Call his mom/dad in the middle of the day and have him speak to him-- take him out into the hall, with your cell phone, and call them in front of him and let them speak to him.

    Use positive behavioral supports-- Like candy when he does well, stickers, constant praise, Use bribary for good behavior.

    Give him a classroom job to keep him busy--- Like assign him some sort of responsibility that the other kids don't have. ( paper collector, homework checker) And if he acts bad take it from him.

    consider where he is sitting in the classroom, move him around so he is not antagonizing other students, Maybe even out into the hallway where you can see him for a while until he can calm down enough to come back to class. move his desk b4 he gets to class. Or turn his desk around to face a wall. or even beside your desk right next to you.

    Arrange for another teacher to let him work in their class. If he acts bad send him to another teacher and let him work in their class.

    If you have a teacher aide-- provide the aide with his work and remove him to work one on one with the aide in the library away from the other kids.

    Use preventive strategies ( prevent behavior b4 it starts), like if he gets up to use the pencil sharpener often have already sharpened pencils, if he needs paper, already have papers ready for him. If he talks alot in line in the hallway make him the line leader so you can see him all the time, or make him walk with you.


    Have a lot of work for him to do--- like incessant non stop worksheets to keep him busy all day. Don't allow gaps for free time.

    When he starts acting bad nip it in the bud, stay on him like white on rice. Don't ignore bad behavior it only gets worse.

    Last resort - write constant referrals on him - get administration involved. Adminsitration will be mad at you for writing referrals everyday-- but you have to make it known that he is a problem. Your best bet, will even be that they place him in someone else's clas, because the constant referrals makes him their problem now and they will become irritated with you and him- however, if he gets moved at least you don't have to deal with him anymore.
     
  18. Mellz Bellz

    Mellz Bellz Comrade

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    Oct 25, 2011

    This kind of student is the most frustrating kind. I dealt with a similair student last year and to some extent you have to pick and choose your battles. It is smart in ignoring him. Last year I had a student who would constantly try to provoke me while I was teaching Math (because he hated the subject and did not even want to attempt it). He would do anything from banging on his desk, making noises, talking over me while I was teaching, to actually physically try to threaten me. It is a thin line of when to react and when not to react because the threats were most likely just threats for attention, but naturally you need to take those things seriously. Most of the time I would ignore him and go on teaching (very difficult to do while a student is trying to tell me that he is going to have me fired because I make him angry). Usually though when he saw he wasn't getting anywhere with me, he'd give up and target a student who he knew could not tune him out. Unfortunately, my administration last year was not very supportive and it would usually result in me having to take the rest of my students somewhere else to complete the lesson since the student refused to leave the classroom. If you have supportive administration it would be a good idea to develop some kind of plan of removing him from the classroom when he becomes disruptive to other students. Explain to him that his behavior is unacceptable, but once it begins to prevent other students from learning he will not be allowed to stay in the classroom.

    For the times that he sits there and does nothing, but is not disruptive just let him be, but document, document, document. I hope that this situation gets taken care of!
     

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