What do you do when they won't listen

Discussion in 'Early Childhood Education Archives' started by Ashtrey, Jan 29, 2006.

  1. Ashtrey

    Ashtrey Companion

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    Jan 29, 2006

    I am doing some field experience in a Kindergarten Classroom for my Social Studies methods class. I have been in the class a total of 3 times (for a total of 3 hours per day) Last week was awful, I was working with the students while they were roating between myself, the teacher, and the teacher aid.....anyways, there was only 7-8 kids in the group at a time.

    I was reading a book to them, and then they were supposed to respond to the book by either drawing a picture and/or responding to the prompt. But listen to what happened, I hate to be "sexist" or whatever but the little boys in this class - WOW!! They would not listen to the book, they were hitting/fighting/stabbing each other with pencils, throwing crayons at me/taking my papers/picking up chairs - putting them on their backs and running around/screaming and yelling.

    It was so out of control.......I tried everything I could - but I didn't want to go "tattle on them to the teacher" so, we managed and some how I got through it without having a nervous breakdown.

    After class, the teacher asked me how everything went - I just said bad.....and she said, yeah, they have all been a little wired this week!!

    So, I guess my quesiton is what do you do, when they refuse to do their work, refuse to listen....I can't really do anything....I just would like some ideas....because I am almost scared to go back this week :(
     
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  3. mskathy

    mskathy New Member

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    Jan 29, 2006

    a couple of things, Ashley. First if they just aren't cooperating get them off their bottoms and into somekind of movement to release some energy. Do a dancing game like head, shoulders, knees and toes, or simon says, be sure to make it full of movement and fun. I like to say " lets get the wiggles out." Second, remember you are relatively new to the kids and they will try to get away with everything they can with you. Ask the head teacher what she does with this specific group of kids when they "act out". Some teachers simply remove the biggest instigator from the situation, this can help long enough to get the other kids involved in thier activity so you can talk to the lone child about his actions. As far as the hitting/ stabbing and hands on issues these children need to learn that this is not acceptable behavior and that thier will be consequences. Again talk to your supervisor to see exactly what those consequences can be. And one note; as far as what you called a sexist remark, be aware today its a group of boys, tommorow it may be a group of girls!
     
  4. OldEnglish

    OldEnglish Rookie

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    Jan 29, 2006

    Ashley,
    It sounds as though you have caught a class with a teacher who already does not have control. By this stage of the year, if the regular classroom teacher has instilled discipline, the majority of the students will behave for a visitor. So cheer up, and don't take it as a personal failure. (In the first field experience I ever completed, I walked into a kindergarten classroom where five children were seated on the floor listening to the teacher read, ten or more children were turning flips and cartwheels and running about the room, and three little boys were gathered around the bucket that was catching the drip from the ceiling...they were all urinating into the bucket and onto each other. It took me ten minutes to seat everyone and gain silence, and then we discovered that a little girl had become trapped in the bathroom and had been beating on the door and yelling for help for some time! The teacher was a sweet-heart, but not strong on discipline.)
    You have to become assertive yourself to contol your own little group. Speak clearly and sternly. Find out what recourse you have for bad behavior beforehand: can you call the parent? send them to the principal? make them sit in for recess? Then apply those conequences diligently. Decide what cue you will use to gain attention: raised hand, finger snap, etc. and then give your group a lesson. "When I raise my hand, be silent at once. Now try it, everyone talk or make sounds." Raise your hand. Cheerfully praise the ones who react quickly by stopping their noise. Do this again, and then say something teasing to one who missed the cue, like, "Uh, oh, Mike, you missed it...now pay attention. Now make noise.." Do a one-to-one lesson with Mike. Give a lot of verbal encouragement to appropriate behavior, and consistent consequences for inappropriate behavior, if it is too disturbing to be ignored. Once you develop your cue for attention, do the same lesson for sit down, stand up. The students love to try to keep up with your commands, and love the verbal praise they receive when performing quickly and correctly. You have to train students to respect your rules before you can teach, and respecting rules are social study skills at that age. Good luck! OldEnglish
     
  5. MrsMikesell

    MrsMikesell Cohort

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    Feb 18, 2006

    What I do when they refuse to listen is get very, very quiet or stop talking.

    They wonder what is "up".

    I don't get paid enought to fight or scream over 5 year olds, so I just be quite.

    Eventually they will wonder what is going on and listen...

    And I work with a very, very, very rough population. And it works.

    Try it!

    Good luck!

    Kelly :)
    http://www.mrsmikesell.com
     
  6. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    Feb 18, 2006

    Do they listen to the regular classroom teacher? If so, maybe she should give them a talk about treating you with the same respect. They may not think of you as the "teacher".
     
  7. wdwteach

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    Feb 18, 2006

    A mentoring teacher should have something better to offer than just " they have been a little wired this week". Let me offer this suggestion. I don't know what kind of control this teacher has so I really cannot comment. I will say that if you feel that you are not being adequately prepared then find a way to NICELY get into other classrooms. I did the same thing during my internship. I was not getting what I needed so I suggested that maybe I should visit other grade levels so that I could figure out what my strengths were and see different teaching styles. It was the best thing that could have happened.
     
  8. MOBO

    MOBO Rookie

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    Feb 18, 2006

    Your mentoring teacher should have given you a copy of her discipline plan as well as how she conducts her class as soon as you began your experience. I would talk with other teachers in the school or in that grade level and ask them for ideas on class control. Most teachers are willing to give suggestions to student teachers.
    Good Luck!
     
  9. puff5655

    puff5655 Cohort

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    Feb 22, 2006

    This is just what I would do..

    If I already know ahead of time that the ones with the shorter attention spans are going to be behaving badly, I seperate them so they cant reach each other.

    If they are still distracted, or are inching towards each other, I give them 1 warning and let them know what the consequence will be if they do it again (for the classroom I was in- no morning sticker!)

    And after that, if they are still misbehaving- time out.
     
  10. MissR

    MissR Comrade

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    Feb 22, 2006

    I agree with getting the kids involved in some kind of movement. Even while you are reading you can give them something to do... every time you read a certain word they make a certain noise or do a certain movement. That way they are listening to the story, but they can feel like they are part of it. It sounds like maybe they were bored, so maybe the story or the way it is read needs to be spiced up.
     
  11. Mable

    Mable Enthusiast

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    Feb 23, 2006

    My first thought was that you'd have to establish some ground rules before going into this. Even as a student teacher, the students have to know your expectations of them.

    Re-evaluate your lesson and see if it was appropriate. Did they have enough background experiences with this type of lesson to be able to complete it with you? Step back to the basics if you have to. Add some active components.
     
  12. Dolla

    Dolla Companion

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    Feb 23, 2006

    I also tend to do what Puff5655 does. I give two warnings and explain what the consequence will be if they do not behave (time out) and if they get time out I give them a minute for each year that they are old eg. if they are 4, they get 4 minutes and so on. I find this works and usually if one gets time out the others tend to behave better. After their time out, I go down on my knees to their level to maintain eye-to-eye contact and explain once again why they were given a time out. My form of time out is to stand facing the wall.... they get bored and figure that it is better to be involved in the lesson and have fun than it is to stand and stare at a wall. The explanation afterwards is very important for me.
     
  13. kidsalot

    kidsalot Comrade

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    Feb 23, 2006

    Does the schoolsystem you work for support time - outs? Not to be confrontational and maybe I misunderstood your posting, but I would be very careful using a time - out that could be viewed as degrading such as facing the wall. I too have children that are difficult. If they exceed my two warnings (3 strikes and your out) they are asked to leave the area and sit quietly at a table till they feel they canm join the group. This removes them from the environment but also gives them ther control to choose when they feel they can return.
     
  14. NELNaples

    NELNaples Rookie

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    Feb 23, 2006

    I subbed for a Kindergarten class for two days. At one point one of the teachers walked around the class (students were out) and mentioned I had my hands full.

    But they were ok. We have microphones, so that is helpful. If not, lights out. I do eyes on me. Eyes on me. Saying their names or sending them to their seat for a time out maybe? I feel so bad for the kids that are patient and paying attention in that situation.
     
  15. puff5655

    puff5655 Cohort

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    Feb 23, 2006

    time outs

    I can't speak for her, but what I was talking about as a "time out" was if we were on the rug- they go sit at the table.. and if they goof around there, they have to put their heads down. If we are doing an activity at the table, a time out is in a chair in the corner. I've never done the "face the wall."
     
  16. Dolla

    Dolla Companion

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    Feb 24, 2006

    I use the stand and face the wall because I don't want them to associate a chair with being naughty as they do spend a good amount of time sitting during the day. The minute for each year of their life is a technique which a colleague of mine saw on Nanny 911 and Little Angels. Please also bear in mind that I have 25 children in my class ages 3 and 4 and the tables are occupied most of the day. Space is also quite limited in our classes so there isn't really a "time-out corner" as such. I do not use it as a form of degrading the children.
     
  17. tracieteaches

    tracieteaches Companion

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    Feb 24, 2006

    I don't know how you feel about "bribes" but sometimes they save our sanity. Also, they work particularly well with kids who have ADHD. Here's a great one to try: Play the Student-Teacher Game! Here's how: The teacher counts backwards from 10 to 0. If the kids get quiet before you say 0, they win the point. If not, you do. At the end of the week or day, however you want to do it, if the kids have more points than the teacher, they win a piece of candy.
     
  18. puff5655

    puff5655 Cohort

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    Feb 24, 2006

     
  19. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Feb 24, 2006

    I remember my first "circle" time. It was such a failure, I had to do something fast. I asked my co-op teacher to model a lesson for me. I observed, asked questions, and tried it again--and it did get better.
     
  20. hatima

    hatima Devotee

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    Feb 24, 2006

    Blue,

    I tried the quiet technique MrsMikesell was talking about with the fifth graders I student teach. They were loud and arguing everything I told them to do. I've been in the classroom with them since school started last August. I realized yelling wasn't working so I was really quiet. I had to turn the light off too. They looked at me and said quietly to eachother, "Oh now Miss. H is mad." This was back in January.

    Today, and this month in general our fifth graders have been extreamly argumentative and loud. When being quiet didn't work. I blew my wistle. It worked! I was shocked and a little embarrased,:eek: :eek: because I knew the other teachers in the hall already knew myself and my teaching partner lost control of the class. Next week we are discussing the rules that the class knows are in place and have the class write them (as a list of manners to relate to social studies), then we will sign them and post them in the classroom. I hope it works.

    My CT told me you have to mix up the techniques you use so one doesn't stop working.
     

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