What Do You Dislike About Your Principal

Discussion in 'Debate & Marathon Threads Archive' started by TiffanyL, Jun 24, 2010.

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  1. TiffanyL

    TiffanyL Cohort

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    Jun 24, 2010

    Okay, now that we are on summer break and have time to reflect on our year, what is it exactly that your P does that drives you nuts, ticks you off, frustrates you to no end, causes you to lack confidence in them, etc?

    I hear a lot of teachers express frustration about their P, and I'm curious as to what it is exactly that drives you crazy (and then I can make sure I'm not doing it....:whistle:)
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2010
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  3. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    This year, I had the MOST WONDERFUL principal. She was a first year princiapl. She used to work in the admin office for the ELD program. Her job was cut and they moved her to our school. The P before her was HORRID! No one could stand him.

    So, what were the difference between our new P and the old P?:
    1) she takes the time to listen to you and to really, honestly take your suggestions into consideration. He pretended to care and still did what he wanted to do.

    2) she doesn't hug and kiss the pretty, hot teachers. He did. :(

    3) She doesn't play favorites. He did.

    4) She listens to her staff and makes the best choices that she can for the school. He listened to his "groupies" and made decisions for them.

    5) When we question her motives, she will share her though process and her reasoning. He would say, I don't have to tell you, or shrug.

    I resigned after him and worked for another school for a year. That P was pretty good too, but didn't communicate very well, that's all.

    Now, I'm back at the old school, with my new P and love it. :)
     
  4. TiffanyL

    TiffanyL Cohort

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    Peachy, I often hear teachers feel as if their P plays favorites.

    From a teacher's perspective, what does that look like? What exactly is it that happens (i.e. one grade levels gets more of the budget than another, etc.).
     
  5. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    The majority of my posts regarding my principal are praise, rather than bashing... but I worry about my principal sometimes. I think he's starting to lose his memory, and it is difficult to explain certain things to him. He gets confused easily. He also forgot to do my evaluation until the second last full day of school (despite several reminders from me). In all honesty, I think my Vice Principal had really been holding things together for him for several years, but she has gone through several major issues and I worry about her sanity... some of the choices she makes are not the best, and I think I'that'[s about as detailed as I'm going to get in a public forum. It really worries me.

    Having said that, they are the most supportive admin team you could ever hope to have... they will back you up 100%, and I really appreciate that.
     
  6. VANewbie

    VANewbie Devotee

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    My P kind of plays favorites. I do not have anything negative to say about my P. Now my AP on the other hand is really nice but she doesn't care about much. If you go to her with a issue or problem about school related or student related stuff she pushes you off to someone else. she doesn't want to deal with anything.
    I don't get her sometimes. Shes so nosey in wanting to know things but does not want to help.
     
  7. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    In regards to money, no that is never an issue. Everyone receives the same amount. IF we get extra money, then everyone gets to vote on how it is used (Like my job is based on money from the state that they voted on).

    Here is an example:
    Teacher A, mid-year, started to arrive at school AFTER 8:30. Bell rings at 8:20. So, another teacher had to watch not only her own class, but teacher A's class. P knew all about it. Nothing happened.

    Teacher B, who is always an hour early to school, doesn't arrive until 8:00 one day. Well before she even needs to be at school, according to contract. Principal berates her that she was late and needs to get to school earlier.




    Teacher C doesn't bother to really keep up with the BB in her classroom.

    Teacher D, who is 7 months pregnant is now unable to change her December BB (it's Feb now). P berates her.



    Teacher E does very mediocre work at school but is put up for tenure.

    Teacher F works her booty off to make it an awesome year for her kids. She spends hours on this board, researches for hours on the internet, comes up with fun, engaging projects for her class, implements readers and writers workshop. Created a neat website to encourage home-school connection. Every three month had a neat book award ceremony. And so on. Yet, P made her life miserable, asking that she leave the school district. No reasons are given. She resigns instead and gets a job, for a year, at another school, then comes back after the school district forces P to resign.
     
  8. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    I love my P and AP - they are supportive of staff, open door policy as long as they aren't busy, quick with praise, they are fair, and willing to listen to whatever crazy ideas we come up with.

    Having said that, here's what I wish I could change,

    *better communciation - i.e, policy changes, what's happening with students absent 20 plus days,
    *speak with individual teachers about issues such as leaving during their prep, food in the classroom, etc instead of addressing the entire staff in faculty meetings
     
  9. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    My principal plays favorites. He talks daily to 3 teachers and he may say "hello" to the rest of us. Working in a school with only 9 teachers, it is very obvious. He also made the teacher with the least amount of teaching experience (2 years) our school's Learning Leader without asking if anyone would be interested in being one. I would personally like to be learn something from someone who has experienced it rather than read a book on it...:huh:
     
  10. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Amen!!! EVERY single school I worked at with every single P did that. The good and the bad ones. Why do they do this in front of the whole staff? If it's a problem among many of the teachers, then I can see it being addressed, but if it's just one teacher, why not talk to that teacher first, privately?
     
  11. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Tiffany, I suspect that you're a lot like my principal-- a total professional, a dream to work for.

    There's nothing I would change.
     
  12. TiffanyL

    TiffanyL Cohort

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    Jun 24, 2010

    This is wonderful feedback. I think its a poor attempt at avoiding confrontation so they think if they tell the whole staff they not only avoid a difficult conversation but prevent any others from potentially behaving in the same manner.

    I've heard you guys refer to this issue more than once so I'm taking note on that one!!!
     
  13. TiffanyL

    TiffanyL Cohort

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    Thanks Alice! I work very hard to listen to everyone. Reflecting back on my short career as principal (its been 18 months), I believe I struggled with supporting teachers with discipline but only the teachers who had weak management skills to begin with....does that make sense?

    So, the majority of my teachers are fabulous and if they send someone to the office, I handle it because I trust them wholeheartedly.

    A few teachers, however, send a student without any attempts at resolution. They are quick to give up on kids and THAT GETS UNDER MY SKIN LIKE CRAZY. You mess with our kids and I'm one tough cookie.

    So, in hindsight, I really need a better plan here to support those teachers as well as help them to grow as well as to keep my sanity.

    Now, overall, I'm enjoying the responses to this thread because I may have other areas of weakness that I'm not picking up on (like bring an issue to a staff meeting that only involves 1-2 teachers). :unsure:
     
  14. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Our principal is very likable on a personal level and really professionally as well...but that may be this person's biggest fault. :(

    1. Very, very rarely responds to emails.

    2. Is out of the building each afternoon before the majority of teachers...very difficult to catch and leaves many students unsupervised roaming about the building.

    3. Doesn't hold teachers accountable. Ever. Allow me to elaborate. We don't have to turn in lesson plans, but the principal asks that we turn in a very basic curriculum map at the beginning of the year. Many people do not. The principal asks that we turn in certain testing data. Many people do not. And so on and so on. It's just irritating. And lastly, the principal simply allows crappy teachers to continue sucking up all the oxygen in the building and giving nothing back. It's unbelievable how little some of the teachers do...truly unbelievable. When did holding down the floor tiles become a salaried position? Grrr.

    Added:

    4. Ultimately, it seems the reliable and capable teachers are taken advantage of. My principal knows I can and knows I will, and therefore I am asked to lead this or create that because the person who should be completing the tasks based on job description, committee membership, or what have you in all honestly lacks the skills or lacks the heart. The principal should require those teachers to either step it up or get out.
     
  15. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Tiffany~based on what I've read of your posts, I would enjoy working for you!

    I really enjoy the P I work with now. If I could change something, it would be to support ALL teachers. There were a couple of teachers who are 'oldschool' and parents went to the principal about them....he didn't back them up.
     
  16. hac711

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    My principal was an idiot...there I said it. He was mainly a puppet of the board who looked the part of principal. He didn't know my assistant's name until May. Everytime I refer to her, he always asked who I was talking about. Until about December, he thought I was talking about a parent helper and wanted to give her a kudos at our annual dinner!!! I'm not kidding... He also forgets things and gives us the same memo two days in a row. But what really bothers me is that when the kids got into trouble (I mean serious things like stabbing another student with a pen, a kid hitting a teacher) he just smiled and so "Oh..you're here for a visit?? You didn't mean to do it, right?? Here is some candy!" I was livid. Kids should have been expelled or suspended at least, instead they got candy.... so angry...
     
  17. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    I am always so impressed by how much you are always trying to grow Tiffany! :thumb:

    I also adore my P. He gets down and colors with the kids-I had 3 pics of him with the kids in my end-of-the-year slideshow-playing with them at field day, etc. He's very supportive-attends every classroom event we invite him to. He walks through every classroom even if just for a minute every day. He really tries to change the issues our campus is dealing with. Our P is capable of seeing the positive in everyone which I think is great for dealing with challenging students.

    Now, no one is perfect...so if I'm being honest 2 things drive me crazy. One is the communication-sometimes our whole admin just kind of assumes everyone knows what's going on. So that turns into us looking like an idiot to our parents because we tell them one thing, then changed to another, then back to the 1st again-because we aren't hearing from the top what time the meeting starts or how a policy is supposed to go.

    The other is follow-through. I agree with him that we are adults and shouldn't have to be policed-in an ideal world. He'll send a memo saying recess should only be 20 minutes-classes still continue to take an hour. Field trips should not be taken away as punishment-teachers still do it-nothing is done. We have a handful that are habitually late or park in the visitor's lot-things that we are explicitly told not to do. Those teachers come on time 2 days in a week and that's celebrated-meanwhile there are teachers who are an hour early every day. It feels like those kids in class who are always good but not recognized for that because the teacher is too busy trying to reward those for whom it's so hard to be good (that probably didn't even make any sense-it's been a long week).
     
  18. cmw

    cmw Groupie

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    1. Make teachers accountable. Walk around and get on those teachers who are NOT doing their jobs. (e.g. leaving students unsupervised, not doing their arrival/ dismissal duties/ yelling at students/ coming in late and leaving early etc..)

    2. Don't play favorites. (e.g. let 1 teacher take charge of planning things/ let 1 teacher be in your office when she should be with her class/ meet with this teacher more than other teachers)

    3. Keep meetings organized and succinct. Our meetings sometimes would be a jumbled mess and took four times as long as necessary.:p Also make staff attend them. We has so many staff that would have reasons not to be there or leave early. It's the one chance a month schools have to get everyone on the same page and it is important everyone is there.

    4. Make sure duties are shared equally. One of the things that did me in this year was having outside duty 45 minutes a day along with only 1 other teacher. (Here in Ohio that includes several months of cold and yucky weather). At least 8 other staff could have rotated this duty. :mad:

    5. Know all your staff and their schedules. We were so short staffed this year during lunch time duties and there were many staff that could have been told to assist. Especially look at those staff who are there only a few days a week. They can have duties too.

    6. Do what is best for kids, not for staff. I have seen situation after situation where decisions were made b-c staff made them and told the principal that it was best. They told the P that they could not do things. (It should not be an option).

    Good luck! :hugs:
     
  19. KateL

    KateL Habitué

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    Pronounce the teachers' last names correctly! Neither of the principals I've worked for have done that. Yes, my last name is unusual, and it involves sounds that aren't usually together in English, but the students learn it after a few days. Why can't my principals remember it?? I have corrected them sometimes, but they never seem to remember. It's embarrassing in IEP meetings when the students say my name one way (the correct way) and the principal says it a different way.
     
  20. TeacherApr

    TeacherApr Groupie

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    My principal is too nice....
    However, a huge issue that was affecting everyone in the building the past few years was resolved this past year--thank GOODNESS!!
     
  21. eddygirl

    eddygirl Companion

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    My high school's P is amazing! Here are some of the great things he does that have really caught my attention:

    He stands outside school every morning and greets the students as they come in. He will wave or chat with parents as they drop off their kids.

    At least a few days a week, he eats lunch in the cafeteria with the students.

    I have seen him at every sporting event I have attended (and I attend quite a few).

    He teaches a class and requires the AP's to do so, also.

    His door is always open (literally) unless he is already in a meeting. If you stick your head in, he is more than happy to talk or, if time doesn't allow, will schedule a meeting later in the day.

    If you send him an e-mail, he always responds by the end of the day.

    When I started there eight years ago, he told us new teachers to always remember that although our class, assignments, tests, etc. may be important to us, they may not be important to the student who is dealing with tough issues in his family. He asked that we be understanding that kids have a life outside of school, and that they may be going through a difficult time.
     
  22. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    I will second anything that has been offered here already, especially being consistent when dealing with students and staff. Please don't let students get a pass numerous times, then blow up at them when they do the same action-the fifth time.

    When you make a decision, stick with it. Don't be wishy-washy.

    Don't avoid conflict. Being the boss is hard-deal with it! It would be great to be everyone's friend, but that's not reality. Reality is, students respect those in authority who ARE the authority. When you let students (or staff) walk all over you, they don't really respect you.

    Please, please, please, don't make sweeping policy changes or chew out the whole staff (either in person or in email) based on the actions of one or two teachers! I HATE THIS! If one student in my class is acting up, I would be crazy to punish everyone for that one student's actions-why do P's do this?????

    That's all I can think of for now!
     
  23. Love to Teach

    Love to Teach Cohort

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    The biggest frustration with my principal is never knowing where his line is between showing initiative and infringing on his authority because it can change hourly. :) Taking an action one day may be seen by him as being helpful and showing initiative, and the very next moment, he is upset with you because he feels threatened, like you are trying to 'take over his job' or something when that was never the intention at all. Yet, when you don't step up and see a need and try to address it, he is upset with you for not showing more initiative....around and around it goes. It does get frustrating and keeps every one on edge to some degree. :)
     
  24. mom2sands

    mom2sands Comrade

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    Mine just seems bitter.
    No idea is a good one unless she thought of it first, an ego thing, I guess.
    Never praises a job well-done, only points out the negative.
    Indecisive--changes her mind 2-3 times about her decisions or forgets what she already told the whole staff, then chews us out for not following her directions.
    Our school is not a joyful learning environment. She acts as if she wants it to be, but it is not and as long as she's there, it never will be.

    Thanks for allowing me to rant........I feel better already! :woot:
     
  25. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    I think the P at the school where I did my ST was great and I would love an opportunity to work with him. Some of the reasons I feel he is so good:

    1) He is a trained counselor and this training is extremely beneficial when he works with students. He doesn't avoid disciplining students or dealing with confrontations. He handles it directly, but in a very straight-forward manner. I had to speak with him about a problem student I had. When we met with the student, he asked the student to explain his side of the story, but then explained to the student WHY his actions were not acceptable and that he would still have to face consequences for what he had done.

    2) He has an extremely calm and pleasant demeanor. I've known him for two years now and I cannot recall ever seeing him truly mad or angry about anything. I'm sure he does get angry and upset about things, but he never let's it show.

    3) He is very supportive of the staff and fair to everyone. He allowed me to interview for a position with the school, even though I was still doing my ST (after checking that I would still meet my teaching credentials if I were offered the job). When the position was filled by another (more qualified) candidate, the P approached me one day and said he wanted to explain why I was NOT chosen. Heck, I was NOT certified at the time and would not have met all requirements anyway since my certification was just in math and this was a math/science position. I was happy just to get the interview, but was flattered the P took time to explain why a better candidate was hired.

    4) As I said before, he is very fair. We got along great and he gave me lots of encouragement and praise. But he also called me to his office one day to discuss an action I had done that was NOT a good decision and had led to a parent complaint. The complaint was based on gossip about a side issue of the action (and was not justified), but the action itself was still wrong. I was able to show (through documentation) that I had NOT done what the parent complained about. The P agreed I was right about that, but still properly chastised me for making a poor decision in the first place.

    5) He is VERY supportive of the students and takes a personal interest in them. He greets them every day, attends their school events and activities and even went on an overnight field trip with the middle school. However, the students are treated with the same fairness and consequences for actions. When several middle students weren't giving sufficient effort in my class (and others), he suspended them from the basketball team until they improved their grades. That is rather unusual (in my experience) at the middle school level (more common in high school).
     
  26. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

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    I like the P we have. The problem he has is that he is ADHD. And sometimes he doesn't take his medicine. I know I kid a lot on this forum, but I am not kidding about this.

    The first year he was P. he wasn't on any meds. I might go into his office to talk about some idea, and I could tell he wasn't listening. He was looking in his desk, fiddling with his chair, trying to find his shoes, suddenly turning and checking his e-mail. One day I flat out told him that I wouldn't be coming in anymore with any school improvement ideas unless I had his full attention. He now consciously stops, folds his hands, and stares at me while I'm talking. It's a bit unnerving. But he also takes medication for the ADHD now.

    He still never follows the bullet points during the faculty meeting. He'll skip around and we spend too much time trying to follow him. Someone will say, "We're done with the two at the bottom of the list now." and then everyone nods and crosses those off. He tries to stay on point, but just can't seem to do it. He also talks too fast, so sometimes we have to clarify with each other later. Absolutely no talking during faculty meetings because it distracts him completely and he gets very annoyed. "People! I can stay here all day if I have to." and I think "No, you can't. You'll be gone in about 30 seconds. And they are just trying to figure out what you said."

    He is in our rooms several times a day. We're all very used to him popping in and walking around or watching what's going on. I don't think he likes sitting in the office. He carries a walkee-talkee everywhere he goes because no one can ever locate him.

    He is a bit of a micro-manager. Likes to do what he put someone else in charge of doing. That can be annoying, but we put up with it. He tries to keep out of it, but bless him. He can't stop meddling.

    He also has a tendency to have tunnel vision. He gets fixed on one way or one person. I was a minute late for bus duty one morning. He harped on about it, and then checked on me all year. Go away. In fact, go check on the kindergarten team. They are never there on time. But they aren't in the front hall and not in your immediate sight, so they got away with it all year.

    The only thing that really annoys me has been mentioned already. If only one or two people are doing something wrong, address it with them. I don't want a memo, e-mail, or a discussion about it during a faculty meeting.

    I like the guy. I really do. I think he's smart, interested in making education better and better, funny, someone you could call up in the middle of the night to take you to the airport. He supports the staff and tries very hard to not play favorites. The kids adore him, as do the sane parents.
     
  27. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Some of the many things my principal does right:

    a. He never forgets what it's like being a teacher, mostly because he still teaches 2 classes a day himself. So when there's "snow in the air" (for those of you down south: that's like a full moon on steriods), he's right there in the trenches with us, trying to keep the craziness at bay. He understands the kids because he's still doing the same job we do, at least part of each day.

    b. He's professional. If he does have something to say to a teacher, it's said behind closed doors. I would imagine that, over the 17 or 18 years he's been principal, he's had to correct some of the adults in the building. But I've NEVER heard about it-- and you guys know the grapevine in schools. It's been done privately and professionally.

    c. He's generous. When I returned after 6 years as a SAHM, I received a $3,000 raise. Not what I would have gotten had I remained as a teacher, but I wasn't teaching-- I was home with my kids.

    d. He's aware. He notices what's going on in the building. You never know exactly where he'll show up, on his way to or from his own classes or elsewhere. He's not buried in his office.

    e. He's compassionate. When my medical issues started 2 summers ago, I called and left him a voice mail-- it was July. He called back 5 minutes later, listened to me cry, and told me not to sweat the school stuff-- they would work around whatever I needed them to. And nothing that happened-- all the surgeries, the radiation, the tears in his office and that of the AP-- ever gave me the impression that I should worry about school. All the tmes, that year and other years, when my kids got sick and I had to leave school-- never a mention that it was an issue. When my dad died during the years I was home, the principal and AP came to the wake, even though I was no longer an employee. I'll never, ever, forget the kindness I've been shown.

    f. He's a wonderful example of "living the faith." OK, not exactly germaine to Tiffany's quesition, but it has to be included. In terms of his convictions as a Catholic religious, he puts his money where his mouth is. He has spent some summers in the Salomon Islands, working with a bishop we know there. He's gone to New Orleans over February break to help rebuild. Under his leadership we've had hugely successful fundraisers for everything from Haiti (both before and after the earthquake) to a homeless shelter in the South Bronx to Island Harvest (a local food bank) to the effort to build a center for Camp Anchor (a camp for disabiled kids at a local beach.) He doesn't live in a vacuum-- he works at making the world around him a better place.

    As I suspect you realize, I could go on and on and on.
     
  28. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jun 25, 2010

    I've had good relationships with most of the administrators with/for whom I have worked. I'm not a complainer.

    Venting is good, just be careful when criticizing administrators/colleagues on a public forum...you never know who may be able to track you down, report on you...:eek:
     
  29. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

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    Overall, my principal is great; very well-organized, supportive, kind and good at finding materials or money for things we need.

    Several areas I would like changed:
    1. Like others have said, address issues with those who need it and then follow through!
    2. Treat all grade levels fairly; one grade in our building receives more attention and much more help from aides.
    3. When something big is going on (think RTI), take some action and don't just say that it will be a long process. He is not afraid of doing the work, he is just afraid of not doing it perfectly.
     
  30. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    Jun 25, 2010

    At my old school some of the many issues were that he ignored behavior from some teachers (arriving 30 minutes late, leaving school without giving anyone notice, leaving students alone in the room to go outside to talk on the cell phone, etc). He ALWAYS sided with parents, no matter what the issue was. Johnny failed a test because he stayed out late at brother's ball game? Well then of course I will make that teacher reteach and retest. Susie lost recess for hitting Jane in the head? Of course the teacher saw it wrong, I will make her apologize (a teacher actually had to apologize for this!) He also didn't read journals, didn't attend trainings, had no clue about new or exciting innovations coming in education. He was a former high school ag teacher who just didn't belong in the elementary school. That said, he was a very kind person who would literally take his shirt off and give it it to you if you needed it. He just wasn't a principal.

    It's night and day now at my new school. She is AMAZING. (Helped, I think, by the fact that she is a former 1st grade teacher). She is excited about education and new, innovative ideas. She is in our classrooms daily. She knows what we are doing, knows our kids, and will sit with kids to work with them. She researches, reads, and encourages us to try new things. Not only does she back us with parents, but she'll deal with it and we never even know. She's always friendly and excited. I was working in my room the other day, clearing out even more stuff and she stopped by to see how it was going. She LOVES us clearing out and becoming more streamlined, so she dove in and helped sort and stack some stuff. The whole time she was doing that we were discussing some changes for next year. Also, when they lost my gradebook at the end of the school year this year, she offered to redo it herself. I would never ask her to, but it was nice to get that offer.
     
  31. jday129

    jday129 Comrade

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    Jun 25, 2010

    I am very happy with our current P. She works tirelessly and if I express a concern to her, she expresses concern back.

    I did have a terrible P a few years ago. He never learned my name. He berated me in front of my middle school students because they were too loud returning from a field trip (there were no other classes nearby and I was happy the kids were so eager to talk about the trip). Then on the Tuesday of Thanksgiving week as soon as the last teacher left he sent out an email that he was quitting immediately. That was the last we saw or heard of him.
     
  32. cheer

    cheer Comrade

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    Jun 25, 2010

    P's

    Well I am not too sure who our "P" is we have 2 people who fill that bill. I dont have any major issues with them.

    1) They always back their teachers when a parent has an issue (this is unheard of but they do it)
    2) The one P (I guess he's the assistant) is the teachers advocate and he take our concerns to the big P. He has really helped get issues with certain students addressed. If he wasnt supportive I am not sure the issues would have been handled. He is the one who is in the day to day operations with us.

    I would like to see Big P more in the day to day operations but the opposite is happening ( I just think she has alot to offer us and is too far extended in her other obligations. Sad because she rocks and is the main reason I took the job 8 years ago)

    I would also like to see assst. P do a better job with class observations.

    After hearing about other schools P, I feel pretty lucky~
     
  33. knitter63

    knitter63 Groupie

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    Jun 25, 2010

    Principals have a hard job, and I know I would not want to pursue that area of my education career! That said, I think it is wonderful, Tiffany, that you care enough to want to continue to improve. To me, a good principal does the following:
    1.Is fair-to both staff and students
    2.Does not forget what it is like to be in the classroom
    3.Demonstrates professionalism at all times
    4.Keeps communication open at all times
    5.Does what is best for the students, and the school population as a whole.
     
  34. demijasmom

    demijasmom Companion

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    Jun 25, 2010

    My former P had her favorites, she constantly said in meetings so and so's class NEVER has any behavior issues.(I'm thinking are you kidding me, when do you walk around?) At EVERY staff meeting she blamed the teachers for the students behavior, she said it was the teachers fault that they roll on the floor, are disrespectful and can't read.( NO how about these students get to do whatever they want because there are no CONSEQUENCES and they come to school late everyday or miss weeks of school.) She rarely came out of her cubicle. The P refers to them other than children, she says things like ''the teachers who work here need to love our babies". If a teacher sent a student to the office with a referral, the student returned to the classroom.

    This is why I am glad I will not have to work with her AGAIN.
     
  35. deedee

    deedee Connoisseur

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    Jun 25, 2010

    This hasnt always been by a P but I agree about the whole school emails....I hate the emails about issues that have nothing to do with me and on the flip side if you happened to be the one making the mistake its embarassing to have an email sent to everyone. I would rather a one on one discussion or email.

    Cut the newbies a little slack with procedures-We are really trying! :) Im sure you do this!

    I really like my P and feel blessed to have such a supportive Admin. team!
     
  36. loves2teach

    loves2teach Enthusiast

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    Jun 25, 2010

    I LOVE my principal and am proud to say that they are a really good friend and mentor. I have learned more from them than I ever did in college or at other schools I have worked at. My P will take advice, answers emails and messages immediately (when possible) and is always there when we need something. If I could change something, I would wish that they held every teacher accountable and were willing to confront those teachers who aren't doing what they are supposed to. I know it is difficult to do that though.

    I am thinking about becoming a principal one day and think about this a lot. Great post!
     
  37. jwteacher

    jwteacher Cohort

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    Jun 25, 2010

    My current P is great but one of my previous P's had a lot of faults...

    1. Formed polarizing cliques with the Barbie doll teachers (Every morning he would hang out before school and casually chat in the rooms of the Barbie dolls. He never once came to my room to chat or ask how I was. The only time my P stepped into my classroom was for formal observations. A lot of the veteran teachers experienced the same treatment, therefore did not trust the P.)

    2. Gave preferential treatment to his favorites (Once I had a 12:30 post-observation conference and a Barbie doll teacher had a 12:45 one. An earlier conference my P was in lasted to 12:40, and when he saw me and his 12:45 Barbie doll, he invited the Barbie doll in and told me he would rearrange his conference time with me. He never did.)

    3. Would never follow through on any professional development. Anything we were trained and supposed to collect data on would never be checked for accountability. We had a brand new reading assessment tool that he invested a lot of the school's money. It was quickly forgotten about within 6 months because the monthly meetings he was supposed to have with grade-level teams never took place.

    4. Randomly pulled our TA for his own personal use. We were supposed to have a TA at scheduled times so some of our students could receive intervention services. When our TA didn't show up, we would find out later, for example, that our TA was summoned to drive and get lunch for a few of his select buddies. If we asked the P where our TA was, he would say, "She was attending to more important issues."

    5. Never responded to my e-mails. Anything I asked I would have to go up to him individually, and his body language was like that of a dentist coming up to him wanting to do a root canal.


    Sorry, I know I got carried away writing this. I really need to vent about this P sometimes because it was a horrible experience. :mellow:
     
  38. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Jun 25, 2010

    loves2teach~I'm thinking of getting my princial's certification as well. Great post!
     
  39. schoolteacher

    schoolteacher Habitué

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    Jun 25, 2010


    No way! Your P came to our school, lol! Except we can't individually go up to our P - we must make an appointment, which may be granted anywhere from 1 day to 2 weeks later, or possibly not at all. And we are not allowed to email our P at all. Our P gets VERY angry if you do so.



    I would also have to add:

    -publicly humiliates staff at faculty meetings

    -collects "anonymous" surveys about P's performance from grade chairs, thereby knowing who said what

    -demands to know who the negative people are at your lunch table, with pen poised to write down the list of names

    -tells you "it's your job to handle it" if you were lucky enough to get the wild, out of control student whose brother was expelled last year (and to expel a student from an elementary school is very rare in my district), and you request some support of the P

    -tells the staff it is our fault that the school did not make AYP this year because apparently we did not teach reading to half of our class

    -tells a new teacher that she must mentor a 35 year veteran teacher and that the P "wants to see a change" in the veteran teacher's classroom management as a result of the mentoring


    Yes, I could go on and on, but I am still making the list of 10 positives about my P, and I'm only up to number 7, lol.
     
  40. jwteacher

    jwteacher Cohort

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    Jun 25, 2010

    That sucks for you schoolteacher as I assume he is still your principal? :(
     
  41. heymiss

    heymiss Comrade

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    Jun 25, 2010

    My principal last year was TERRIBLE, which was really unfortunate as a first year teacher. I am so excited to start at my new school in August because I can already tell that my new P will be at least 50 times better than the last one.

    Let's make a list of what was wrong with my old P, shall we?

    1. Did not have a good grasp of the English language, which made communicating with him extremely difficult.
    2. Did not have any "people skills" and preferred to communicate via email for every single thing.
    3. Kept secrets from the staff and did not let us know anything until the day something was supposed to happen.
    4. Had little to no teaching experience.
    5. Did not have ANY idea how to deal with elementary age kids.
    6. Had no certification at all and no idea of the actual certification process.
    7. After evaluations, we had to BEG him to give us feedback.
    8. Was regularly out of the office and too busy to talk with us.
    9. Regularly spoke badly of some teachers in front of other teachers.
    10. Due to lack of English skills, would send out emails that took us ten minutes to decipher. If you can't communicate to your staff, how can you communicate with parents?
    11. Never had answers to questions, and would instead refer us to another admin, who also had no answers.
    12. Did not provide teachers with IEPs for SPED students and instead said that "it's too soon in the school year." Really? October is too soon? May is too soon?
    13. When teachers asked questions or made suggestions, he just smirked at us without acknowledging what we actually said.

    This isn't even the complete list, but I started getting really irritated thinking about it so I had to stop. I probably had one of the first years EVER, as far as lack of administrative support, so I totally feel like I've won the lottery by landing a job at my awesome new school.
     
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