What do you call the Thursday before Easter?

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by TeacherGroupie, Apr 4, 2012.

  1. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    What do people call the Thursday before Easter?

    I'm soliciting names from different Christian denominations.

    I'm also interested in names from other languages and other times, and also names from different languages. Roman alphabet would be preferred, thanks.
     
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  3. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    I know what you're talking about, but we never actually recognized the day growing up (we were very religious, too). It was just...Thursday.
     
  4. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Thanks, JustMe. Did your church recognize the day?
     
  5. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    My family calls it Holy Thursday.
     
  6. bros

    bros Phenom

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    I call it Thursday.

    Although I am not religious.
     
  7. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    No, we did not. We had the Lord's Supper once a month, too, so looking back I'm a bit surprised we didn't.
     
  8. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    My church/family did not recognize Thursday as a special day- I've never heard of that? We were Protestant (church of Christ). There was palm Sunday and good Friday of course...we also did not do the whole giving up something for lent/meatless Friday thing like Catholics do. My family growing up was VERY religious.
     
  9. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Oboy! Caesar! Can you tell me what it's called (or what it's been called) in the classical languages?
     
  10. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Don't shoot me here :), but Wikipedia has a lot of different names for Maundy Thursday and plenty of history if that would help.
     
  11. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    This: Most scholars agree that the English word Maundy in that name for the day is derived through Middle English and Old French mandé, from the Latin mandatum, the first word of the phrase "Mandatum novum do vobis ut diligatis invicem sicut dilexi vos" ("A new commandment I give unto you, That ye love one another; as I have loved you"), the statement by Jesus in the Gospel of John 13:34 by which Jesus explained to the Apostles the significance of his action of washing their feet. The phrase is used as the antiphon sung during the "Mandatum" ceremony of the washing of the feet, which may be held during Mass or at another time as a separate event, during which a priest or bishop (representing Christ) ceremonially washes the feet of others, typically 12 persons chosen as a cross-section of the community.

    Others theorize that the English name "Maundy Thursday" arose from "maundsor baskets" or "maundy purses" of alms which the king of England distributed to certain poor at Whitehall before attending Mass on that day. Thus, "maund" is connected to the Latin mendicare, and French mendier, to beg.[37][38] A source from the Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod likewise states that, if the name was derived from the Latin mandatum, we would call the day Mandy Thursday, or Mandate Thursday, or even Mandatum Thursday; and that the term "Maundy" comes in fact from the Latin mendicare, Old French mendier, and English maund, which as a verb means to beg and as a noun refers to a small basket held out by maunders as they maunded.[39]
     
  12. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    I've seen that, JustMe. Things turn out to be not quite that simple. The phrase "maundsor baskets" reflects a typo: it should be "maunds or baskets". The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod sermon is right that mandatum in Latin won't yield the maundy in English, but the derivation from maund 'beg' can't be right: French mendier 'beg' exists, to be sure, but there's no sequence of sound changes I know of that will turn mendier into maund, and there's no such word as *maundier 'beg' in French that I can find. And, while maund 'beg' does exist in English, it's a slang form - thieves' cant - that postdates maundy 'ceremony of washing feet and giving alms' by several hundred years.
     
  13. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

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    Very good Just me
    I joined my first church on Maundy Thursday when I was in high school.

    :thumb:


     
  14. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    My Latin is mostly Classical, not so much Ecclesiastical, so I don't know very many of the specialized, religious (Catholic/Christian) terms. I'm sorry I can't be more help. :(
     
  15. callmebob

    callmebob Enthusiast

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    Maundy Thursday is what we have always called it in the churches I have gone to.
     
  16. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Caesar, you might like to know that "Vicipaedia" has this:

    Dies Cenae Domini est dies Iovis ante pascham.Alia nomina Latina sunt dies absolutionis seu dies indulgentiae, dies mandati (confer Anglice Maundy Thursday), dies azymorum, consecratio crismatis, quinta feria magna, quinta feria sacra, quinta feria alta, in calendario ecclesiae Romanae "Feria V In Cena Domini", vel dies iovis magnus, dies iovis sacer, dies iovis altus postremo dies absolutus aut dies viridium (e Germanico verbo Gründonnerstag, ad litteram "dies Iovis viridis").
    Dies Cenae Domini est primus dies tridui sacri.
    Fama fert ecclesiarum campanas hoc die Romam volare reverturas die dominica paschali. Interim loco campanarum instrumentis ligneis dei cultus annuntiantur.
    Ut sit feria Christiana numquam est feria rei publicae.
     
  17. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Where's that Like button? :)
     
  18. RainStorm

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    At my church, we call it Maundy Thursday.

    "Dies Mandatum," i.e. "the day of the new commandment."
     
  19. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Wish I knew how far back dies mandati is attested...
     
  20. ally06

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    I'm catholic and have always known it as Holy Thursday.
     
  21. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I'm Catholic.

    In my house it's Holy Thursday, the day we commemorate the Last Supper.
     
  22. TeacherNY

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    I think I have heard it called Holy Thursday but I did see a church sign on the way home from work that said something about Maundy Thursday and I had no idea what it meant.
     
  23. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

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    Maudy Thursday.
     
  24. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I love it when Passover and Holy Week coincide, as they do this year. (Passover starts Saturday; Easter is Sunday.)It makes the story of the first Easter so much easier for kids to understand if their Jewish friends are celebrating Passover at the same time.
     
  25. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    We always called it Maundy Thursday growing up. We always had a beautiful tenebrae service that night. I grew up United Methodist.
     
  26. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    I am a Lutheran. We usually call it Maundy Thursday, and have a service remembering the institution of the Lord's Supper. It is occasionally referred to as Holy Thursday.
     
  27. Mrs. K.

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    I grew up Episcopalian, and at my church it was Maundy Thursday as well.
     
  28. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    This.
     
  29. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    United Methodist here-we call it Maundy Thursday, although I have to admit I didn't really know what Maundy meant. Growing up, we didn't go to the service very often, and even now, if I'm going to skip church, it would be tonight :blush:
     
  30. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Hmmm...I was United Methodist as well and it was never mentioned. It had been said our church was "Baptist-like" in some aspects (example, in being baptised), so I don't know if this was one of the reasons for that or not.

    And TG, that was a lot of "language stuff" for me to wrap my head around! :)
     
  31. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I'm surprised to hear Methodist and Baptist being compared like that. To me, those two denominations are at opposite ends of the spectrum in terms of liberal vs. conservative. Maybe I'm completely confused and mistaken. It wouldn't be the first time. :haha:
     
  32. kcjo13

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    That strikes me funny to hear Methodists described as liberal! (well, I assume we're the liberals!) Some of the little old ladies in church, liberals...:lol:!
     
  33. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    I'm confused by this comparison as well, and I was raised United Methodist. Methodists are much closer to Catholics on the Christianity spectrum than Baptists are. Methodists baptize infants, have confirmation courses and confirmation, and a focus on sacraments (though we only recognize two.) Our services are quite ritualistic, and include many features of a Catholic service (doxology, gloria patri, affirmation of faith, etc.) Methodists do not put a huge focus on "being saved" or on altar calls. Generally, Methodists are thought to be more socially liberal than Baptists, though there are certainly exceptions to that.
     
  34. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    I thought JustMe was referring to her individual church (but I could have interpreted that wrong).
     
  35. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Yes, yes...my church.

    That doesn't at all sound like our church, so people must have been correct when they say we are Baptist-like. We have two sister churches and those are both Baptist. Only a couple of people baptized their babies; I have never heard of confirmation courses and confirmation other than for Catholics, so that's a huge difference; and a lot of terms you mentiond are foreign to me. We DID put a huge emphasis on being saved. And we were also baptized by being fully immersed, not sprinkled.

    We did have a preacher with a mohawk if that counts as being liberal. But he didn't last long. :lol:

    Since I also went to a Baptist church sometimes (although I am a member of the Methodist church and that was most certainly my home church where I taught children's classes and where my parents taught Youth), I can say the biggest difference was that we did The Lord's Supper more often (it was juice, by the way) and recited the The Lord's Prayer each Sunday in unison during prayer. We had an alter where we could go up and kneel to pray, and the Baptist churches I've been to did not. Otherwise, pretty similar.
     
  36. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Was your Methodist church part of the United Methodist Church? There are certain things that a re required if you are a member. Your pastors should have been assigned by the church conference, and would be assigned for a period of 2-4 years. However, one good things about the UMC is that it includes so many different congregations with so many different kids of worship! Typically, though, if you attend a traditional service at a UMC, you expect the service to follow the one set out in the Book of Worship, and for the scripture to follow the lectionary. The UMC also follows the liturgical calendar, so I'd expect to see certain colors in the church at different times of the year. That's not always the case, and there's nothing wrong with doing it a different way (diversity and diverse opinion are always a good thing) but I would notice that things were different. I've been to some quite lovely services at Methodist churches that were nothing like the tradition service I would expect.

    Another major difference is that the Methodist Church ordains women as ministers. Many Baptist churches do not. Official Methodist doctrine supports a safe and legal option for abortion in some circumstances, support equal right for all individuals (specifically mentioning homosexuality,) allow for responsible consumption of alcohol, etc. This is why Methodists are often seen as being more liberal.
     
  37. kcjo13

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    MissCelia, everything you have described could have been my own UMC. It's funny, because I don't really identify with the Catholic church at all, but when it is all laid out like that, we really are similar. And, when you put it in terms of women in the ministry, homosexuality, and abortion, I guess we would be seen as liberal! I have attended the UMC for 25 years+ and never thought of it that way. Probably because my state as a whole is very conservative, so I think of everyone as draped in red (except me) :lol:
     
  38. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Yes, I am (still) a member of _____ _____ United Methodist Church. Our pastors were assigned, though there was a vote as well. The mohawk guy was removed after just one year.

    Our services didn't follow a lectionary. I had to Google it just to review things. [ETA: You know, I can't say for certain we didn't...but I had never heard of it. Would there be a particular sermon they had to preach beyond using certain scripture, because our sermons were certainly not scripted or anything along those lines.) I saw on a church's online calendar the colors you mentioned. That was new to me.

    We had a guest female minister once...went over like a lead balloon.
     
  39. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    I haven't served on a worship committee in over a decade, but I think the lectionary is a suggestion of scriptural readings for each Sunday (and other holy days.) It also lists recommended hymns for each Sunday, and other special services. I don't think it gave sermon topics.
     
  40. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    In our synod of the Lutheran Church, the lectionary gives the three Scripture readings for each Sunday. The pastor usually bases his sermon on one of those readings.
     
  41. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Many churches these days use the Revised Common Lectionary, which gives a reading from the Old Testament or the book of Acts, an Epistle reading, and Gospel readings for each day (and sometimes a choice). The RCL is based on a Roman Catholic lection cycle, so often the readings are the same across English-speaking Western Christianity. Ministers and priests generally preach on one or more of the readings, though they don't have to.
     

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