What do the kinder teachers out there think?

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by brejohnson88, Aug 31, 2010.

  1. brejohnson88

    brejohnson88 Comrade

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    Aug 31, 2010

    Hey everyone,
    I survived week 1 and week 2 is underway now. I was just wondering what you guys thought about this. At what age are children supposed to be working on letter formation, such as writing their names? I took sentance stips and dotted out each students name (I teach 3-5 year olds) and then I am going to laminate them and have them practice tracing their names with dry erase markers. I will assess each student on a basis to see if they are learning and see if I can get rid of the dotted lines. Is this developmentally apporiate? I have seen this done before in my student teaching which I got the idea. What do kinder teachers think? Is this approriate or is this something I should be waiting on? I ask because I had a OT specialist work with one of my students yesterday and I was helping a girl write her name with the dotted lines (She already is trying to write her name by making upside down letters). The OT specialist told me I shouldnt be pushing the letter formating until the student is ready, however, if a student is 4 and almost 5 shouldnt they be getting exposed to formating letters especially the letters in their name?

    Any suggestions would be helpful. I am a new teacher and want to make sure I am doing DAP. Thanks :)
     
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  3. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

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    Aug 31, 2010

    I responded to your other post as well.

    There are lots of other ways to help children learn to write their names without using a paper and pencil.

    When a child is writing, she needs to be able to hold a pencil correctly, and she needs to be able to make the proper formation of the letters. Give the children things to do with pencils that don't involve writing. Make sure they're using the correct grip, and if they're not intervene and show them how to use it and then follow up every time they're holding a writing instrument to make sure they get the appropriate grip.

    Have them form letters in a tray of rice or in shaving cream at the easel, or make letters out of playdough. If you look online there are many ways of getting children to form letters without using a paper and pencil. When your kids go outside, bring sidewalk chalk and let them color on the blacktop with it and draw huge circles or shapes or pictures or whatever.

    A child's hand must be strong in order to write. His wrist must be flexible, and his fingers must be strong enough as well. If all of these aren't in place, writing will be difficult and laborious for a child. Give them time and don't expect it until they're about 5.
     
  4. Silmarienne

    Silmarienne Cohort

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    Sep 1, 2010

    Where i live children are often sent to "schools" at two years old and are writing their names by the time they get to me, often terribly. I think it is important that they get started on correct letter formation as soon as possible, but I agree that pencils and paper aren't the only way. Another idea is having them trace sandpaper letters with their fingers, or "skywriting"; tracing them very large in the air with their hand.
     
  5. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    Sep 1, 2010

    See the preschool forum for a recent list.
     
  6. mandijyn

    mandijyn Rookie

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    Sep 1, 2010

    I am using tempera paint in a ziplock bag with a bit of water- and no air- to help my wee ones form letters- works awesome and they love it!
     
  7. Emilyrsps

    Emilyrsps Rookie

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    Sep 6, 2010

    I agree, three is a bit too young. Let kids be kids. I think sometimes we may push the little ones ahead too quickly. Shaving cream, rice, and flour(check allergies first) are great sensory experiences for children.

    I've also put hair gel in a snack size bags that are doubled sealed with ducted tape. The kids at first like to squish the gel, but later on they will begin making lines and circles. After I notice them making lines and circles I introduce to them simple letters to write such as C, O, J, and L.
     

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