What do I do with my students after they take a test?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Lindsay.Lou, Sep 21, 2008.

  1. Lindsay.Lou

    Lindsay.Lou Companion

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    Sep 21, 2008

    I'm having trouble figuring out what to do with my 9th graders after they take a test. We have 90 minute blocks. The tests take no more than 30 minutes. First of all, after cramming for a test and then taking it, it's like a steam valve has been released...the students are off the wall!

    If I try to get them settled so I can introduce the next unit, they get angry at me (and rightfully so, I think. After all, they just took a test!) I'd like to do something low-key, but the bottom line is I have 60 minutes of instructional time left. Multiply that by about 12 tests per year. I don't want that time to be 'wasted.'

    I feel like I'm swimming against the current for wanting them to actually do something. Even my special education aide told me I should really just be "showing movies" after tests. :huh:
     
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  3. trayums

    trayums Enthusiast

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    Sep 21, 2008

    Since you have 90 minutes and say that the test should only take about 30, why don't you start with a quick review type game? Then give the test. Have them bring a book to read when they are done or let them work on homework for your class or another while others are finishing? (Can you tell I'm not a high school teacher :lol:)
     
  4. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Sep 21, 2008

    Do you get NewsQuiz? I think that's what it is called. I loved it when I was in HS. Current event questions. We used to get bonus points but after I graduated the teacher started doing it for grades. She got this little pamphlet in the mail weekly or so with the list of questions.

    I found these online...
    http://www.nytimes.com/learning/students/quiz/ Might be something you could do.

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/4250964/

    http://www.reuters.com/news/globalcoverage/newsquiz

    http://www.newscurrents.com/intro/quiz.html

    http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/sns-quiz.triviaquiz

    http://www.npr.org/programs/waitwait/quiz/
     
  5. chemteach55

    chemteach55 Connoisseur

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    Sep 21, 2008

    When I taught on a 90 minute block, I used the 1st 45 minutes as my test review time. I then gave the test during the last 45 minutes of the class.
     
  6. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

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    You can start the next unit without really "starting" the next unit. Maybe have them draw on prior knowledge by drawing some pictures. Make up a fun "how much do you know about X" quiz so they can see what they will be learning next and how much they already know about it. For history, you could have them draw a time line of the era you are about to discuss and have them correct it as they go through the unit.
     
  7. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

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    I agree - do some kind of fun anticipatory activity. For example, I do a "welcome to 1984" activity the day before we start reading the novel - I set the room up as a "re-education" center and have the kids rotate through stations, all the while staying very grim. They don't know the terminology I'm using, but that's okay - it certainly increases their interest in reading the book! When I taught 7th grade ELA/SS, I did similar activities with the feudal system and the Black Plague.
     
  8. ByCandleLight

    ByCandleLight Rookie

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    Sep 21, 2008

    All my tests use secondary sources, so it usually takes the full 90 min., or close to it, for everyone to finish the test...even though there are only 10 questions. All the reading and such. It's a pain to come up with the exams, but I think it's worth it in the long run.
     
  9. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Sep 21, 2008

    I have 115 minute blocks. I schedule tests for the last part of the block. You could use the first part of the class for a review of the material and then give the test.

    If you're set on having the tests at the begining of the block, then I would do one of the exploratory activities mentioned above.
     
  10. ozteach

    ozteach Comrade

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    Sep 22, 2008

    [QUOTE

    If I try to get them settled so I can introduce the next unit, they get angry at me (and rightfully so, I think. After all, they just took a test!) I'd like to do something low-key, but the bottom line is I have 60 minutes of instructional time left. Multiply that by about 12 tests per year. I don't want that time to be 'wasted.'
    QUOTE]

    These kids are 9th grade right?
    I don't think it's rightfully so that they get angry at you using instructional time for teaching. You could try to make the lesson a little lighter than normal, but I'd brainstorm the new topic, set books up and get started with some reading or discussion questions. Gosh I'm mean!
     
  11. coffeeteacher

    coffeeteacher Rookie

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    Sep 22, 2008

    I teach ninth grades as well, but only in 50 minute periods. I always make the quiz last until the end of the period and students can work on something for another class or read until everyone is done. If everyone finished before the end of class, I let them talk, but it's only ever 5 minutes until the bell rings.
     
  12. jsfowler

    jsfowler Companion

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    Sep 22, 2008

    I would use 15-20 minutes for a review, take the test, and then do an introductory/discovery activity into the next unit. Make it a fun, hands-on, group activity. Also, I notice that you are social studies. How about finding a short story/children's book about the topic/time period you are studying and do a read aloud. You could also use this time to complete a KWRL chart - a great way to begin any unit!
     
  13. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    Sep 22, 2008

    I always have an assignment for my students to do after testing and it is always for the next unit of study. I totally agree with ozteach - they are in my class for from bell to bell to learn. The other issue for me is that I have students finish tests in 20 minutes and some that take the entire period. So for me it is necessary to maintain the quiet that the other test-takers deserve.

    My "after" testing assignments are usually maps, primary source readings, biographical worksheets, mind maps, etc.... and it does introduce students to the new unit of study. I guess I am mean too:p
     
  14. brigidy

    brigidy Comrade

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    Sep 22, 2008

    I try to give them a few minutes to read, while everyone finishes...but, I do go on. I just have too much content to cover. I like what everyone is saying, try to do a fun introductory activity for the next unit. Time is not wasted and content is covered.
     

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