What books changed you?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by silverspoon65, Jan 22, 2008.

  1. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    2,403
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jan 22, 2008

    I am taking an ELA cluster about using adolescent literature in the classroom. We had to do a survey about books that left an impression on people when they were teens. I got some really interesting answer, so I thought I would ask you all too! Here are the questions.

    1. What book did you read as an adolescent that had a strong impact on how you viewed the world or how you viewed yourself?
    2. Was the book written for young adolescents, for adults, or was it a classic?
    3. Did you read the book in school or out of school?
    4. How did you find the book (e.g., recommended by a friend, librarian, required reading)?
    5. In what ways did the book deal with physical, emotional, moral, social, or intellectual issues or themes?
    6. For you, what was the value of the book?
     
  2.  
  3. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    2,403
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jan 22, 2008

    1. btw, mine was Gone with the Wind.

    2. The book was written for adults

    3. Both – I used it both as personal reading but we also had to keep a reading log of outside reading for school.


    4. I just remember that it was so long and I liked to try to impress people back then so that’s probably why I picked it.


    5. Well the physical and social issues were the civil war in the South. But to me I was more interested in the emotional themes such as determination and perseverance.

    6. I felt like a dork, but I really tried to emulate Scarlett O’Hara in many ways. I consciously thought about the book everyday and became motivated to try my best, always look optimistically at a situation, have faith that the situation would work out for the best, and never give up on whatever it was I was working on. Before I read this book I was a pretty lazy student, and I ended up graduating high school 4th in my class. I really think it changed my life.



    I was also surprised that of all the people i have surveyed so far, everyone picked a classic novel, not a young adult novel.
     
  4. Mamacita

    Mamacita Aficionado

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Messages:
    3,321
    Likes Received:
    12

    Jan 22, 2008

    "Don't ask me who's influenced me. A lion is made up of the lambs he's digested, and I've been reading all my life. "
    -- Giorgos Seferis
     
  5. iSaint

    iSaint Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    98
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 22, 2008

    I realize this doesn't help your survey, but it's a great answer!
     
  6. Budaka

    Budaka Cohort

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2007
    Messages:
    583
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 22, 2008

    The Count of Monte Cristo (the long, long version)

    I loved the revenge theme. I guess I kind of wanted revenge when I was a child?

    I also loved the Call of the Wild.

    Journey to the Center of the Earth

    Funny enough, I just reread journey and I didn't like it as much as when I was a child!
     
  7. JessicaKellin

    JessicaKellin Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2007
    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 22, 2008

    1. Atonement, by Ian McEwan
    2. Adults
    3. Out of school
    4. Found it at a book store
    5. Emotional/moral/social - all about the power of one's actions and about atoning one's sins.
    6. For you, what was the value of the book? Responsibility, awareness.

    *I wanted to reply... but this book really isn't appropriate for teens, even though I read it as a teen.

    However, I do think that any poetry by Billy Collins is inspiring. He has a unique outlook and it is contagious. It's also humorous and easy to read so kids tend to like it better than, say, Tennyson.
     
  8. Noggin

    Noggin Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    92
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 22, 2008

    1. To Kill a Mockingbird

    2. A classic.

    3. I read it on my own out of school.

    4. I found the book at home. My family read a lot so there was no shortage of grown-up books at home.

    5. Heaviest theme was, of course, racism and I thought it was handled beautifully. I loved the innocence of Scout as she asked why the crowd of men were there as Atticus guarded the door alone. That is still my favorite part of the book. Her automatic acceptance of Boo at the end was also such a tender moment. The book opened my eyes to being more aware of social issues and of others in general.

    6. The books value to me was that it was the first moment as a teen that I stopped thinking small and started looking at the world around me. No small feat!

    Great post! I hadn't thought about how much I love that book and why in quite awhile. :D
     
  9. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2005
    Messages:
    10,120
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 23, 2008

    Am I weird, I can't think of any books that really changed me as a teen. Don't get me wrong I read 100s of books, a few for school each year and a ton on my own.

    1) I guess I could say Clan Of the Cave Bear.

    2) for adults
    3) Out of school (and during math class)
    4) My aunt gave it to me
    5) Not sure it did. The girl didn't fit into the clan because she was different. Yet she was strong and made it. (I read this book when I was 15 so it's been 17 years)
    6) I liked how the main character was strong, and seemed to be able to accomplish anything she put her mind too.


    ps: This series is the only thing I really remember reading in high school. I guess the rest just don't stand out.
     
  10. MollyT

    MollyT Companion

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2006
    Messages:
    228
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 23, 2008

    Mine was "The House of Stairs" which I found in the school library and read in my own time.

    I guess I was never one to follow the crowd and this book really reinforced that for me - confirming the importance of being true to yourself and not being pressured by others.
     
  11. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2007
    Messages:
    17,362
    Likes Received:
    46

    Jan 23, 2008

    It's been awhile since I've read this book so the details are fuzzy.
     
  12. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2007
    Messages:
    17,362
    Likes Received:
    46

    Jan 23, 2008

    silverspoon, I also read Gone with the Wind in HS. I loved the movie and decided to read the book to see how much the same/different the two were.

    It's still one of my favorite books!
     
  13. nancy sv

    nancy sv Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2008
    Messages:
    89
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 23, 2008

    1. What book did you read as an adolescent that had a strong impact on how you viewed the world or how you viewed yourself?

    My Side of the Mountain

    2. Was the book written for young adolescents, for adults, or was it a classic?

    adolescents (I think?)

    3. Did you read the book in school or out of school?

    I don't remember

    4. How did you find the book (e.g., recommended by a friend, librarian, required reading)?

    No clue.

    5. In what ways did the book deal with physical, emotional, moral, social, or intellectual issues or themes?

    Huh?? I don't have the foggiest idea!

    6. For you, what was the value of the book?

    It opened my eyes to the possibility of great adventures - and now I'm living it!!
     
  14. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Messages:
    18,938
    Likes Received:
    682

    Jan 24, 2008

    To Kill a Mockingbird impacted me by expanding my view of the world (don't all great books do that?) I read it at home.

    My other favorites were The Heart is a Lonely Hunter and Member of the Wedding by Carson McCullers.
     
  15. MrL

    MrL Companion

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2008
    Messages:
    115
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 24, 2008

    1. Bruce Coville's "My Teacher is an Alien" 4 book series.

    2. Young adults.

    3. Out

    4. It looked cool in the Scholastic Book Orders from my Gifted Center.

    5. What starts as a standard YA sci-fi plot quickly becomes the main characters analysing the strengths and flaws of humanity. The final book is not a battle with the alien council who wish to destroy humanity; it is a trip the main characters take with alien delegates to see the worst of humanity's actions, on and off the battlefield, and justify our existence. Earth's existence is saved by words, not violence. The final revelation as to the reason for humanity's behavior is a stunning bit of science fiction.

    6. From the way I look at biology (I quote to my students "There's no reason to be disgusted. It's only life"), to the way I look at society, death, and war, this may have been the most influencial book I've ever read. Certainly my introduction to hard SF. I broke it out a few months ago and still enjoyed it.
     
  16. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    3,765
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jan 25, 2008

    I have to agree with those that picked To Kill a Mockingbird. I read the book on my own in jr high I think. (Hard for me to remember when, we moved a lot and libraries were my first friends :)) I have probably read this book at least 5 times and I am always moved by Scout's strong believe in the compassion that humans should be capable of, the color-blindness that justice should have and her belief in the love of your fellow human being. As a kid, I do remember being outraged at the injustice of the trial and that fact that nothing could/would change by the actions of one man. I love this book and all the many lessons it teaches.
     
  17. ctmem

    ctmem Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2008
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 25, 2008

    A Prayer for Owen Meany

    Ok, so I was a bully in MS, but I have softened quite a bit. The book that started it all was:


    1. A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving.
    2. probably adults, but it is perfectly acceptable for MS and HS kids.
    3. Independent reading, for book talk in school.
    4. Heh' at the time, my mom made me read it. Thanks mom.
    5. It was the first time this MS tough guy (now MS teacher) cried while reading.
    6. I honestly felt empathy.

    --C
     
  18. firemaple

    firemaple Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Messages:
    104
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 25, 2008

    1. What book did you read as an adolescent that had a strong impact on how you viewed the world or how you viewed yourself?

    A Tree Grows In Brooklyn

    2. Was the book written for young adolescents, for adults, or was it a classic?

    Classic

    3. Did you read the book in school or out of school?

    Out of school

    4. How did you find the book (e.g., recommended by a friend, librarian, required reading)?

    Can't remember

    5. In what ways did the book deal with physical, emotional, moral, social, or intellectual issues or themes?

    Dealth with New York during the depression years. A love story extradornair, with all the realities of love and heartbreak.

    6. For you, what was the value of the book?

    Just reading good writing, which helped me to become a good writer.
     
  19. Emily Bronte

    Emily Bronte Groupie

    Joined:
    May 28, 2006
    Messages:
    1,265
    Likes Received:
    11

    Jan 25, 2008

    I've read lots of books, but there are a couple that stand out.
    1. The Catcher in the Rye.
    2. Classic a former banned one too.
    3. Read it in school 11th grade.
    4. Required reading
    5.Adolescent male in search of his own place in the world he does not trust, but he the biggest fake of all. I guess that is the shortest way I can some it up.
    6. The enjoyment of seeing the world through someone else's eyes is always stimulating for me. Do I agree? Disagree? that sort of thing.
     
  20. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,799
    Likes Received:
    1,165

    Jan 25, 2008

    Interesting book, that; I read it just in the last year.

    Welcome to A to Z, ctmem.
     
  21. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2007
    Messages:
    5,621
    Likes Received:
    6

    Jan 26, 2008

    1) The Handmaid's Tale
    2) Adults
    3) on my own...my parent's weren't to happy that I was reading it, they thought it was too "adult" for me
    4) It was on my older sister's required reading list for a class the upcoming term (she was in college)
    5) The general theme is political--specifically what can happen in society if religous fundementalists are allowed to create a theocratic government.
    6) It was the first time I really thought about the power of a country's government to do good things or bad things in regards to society.
     
  22. MsTeacher98

    MsTeacher98 Companion

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    Messages:
    159
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 26, 2008


    I am exactly the same way. I read 1000s of books in high school- they were my escape from reality. I was intensely shy person who felt different, but escaped into a book whenever possible. They really got me through high school. I liked Ayla and all the other strong characters I encountered- it was my chance to feel brave! There is not one particular book that stands out, though.
     
  23. brigidy

    brigidy Comrade

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2006
    Messages:
    391
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 26, 2008

    One book that impacted me during high school was "The Robe".

    It is a book for adults.

    I read it for a senior book report and it was on the recommended reading list (I went to a private Christian high school).

    The book dealt with moral and social conflicts.

    I still think of that book when I should take a stand for something I believe in.
     
  24. Peaklearn

    Peaklearn New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2008
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 27, 2008

    My Junior year my english teacher brought Stephen Crane into my life. We started with the Red Badge of Courage. She then worked with me one on one and we studied, The Open Boat.

    To be honest, I don't know if the content of the book changed me or if it was having someone take the time to support a sudden burst of teenage passion. I think it was both.

    Mike
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. vickilyn,
  2. miss-m
Total: 279 (members: 2, guests: 256, robots: 21)
test