What Are Some Terms Native To Your Region

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by KinderCowgirl, Jul 14, 2010.

  1. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

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    My Grandmother was from Southern Ill and Ky and she said all of the stuff you guys are saying, makes me remember
     
  2. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    well, I'll be darn
    my stomach is plum tore up
    dag nabit (like darn)
     
  3. funshine2381

    funshine2381 Companion

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    When someone says something crazy or confusing, we say "Do what?" Not sure if it's regional or not, but I've had friends from out of state and they didn't get it.
     
  4. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jul 16, 2010

    Ditto...but I get peppers and onions on as well. Sometimes a white pie.
     
  5. Teachling

    Teachling Groupie

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    Don't know if this was mentioned earlier but the pronunciation of Houston(like the city in TX) is pronounced HOUSE-ton in NY. ;-)
     
  6. LMT

    LMT Rookie

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    In NC, we have Beaufort (Bo-fort) and in SC we have Beaufort (Bew-fort).[/QUOTE]

    LOL!! I live about 20 min. from NC Beaufort now and move to SC Beaufort next week! (It'll always be Bew-fort to me!!)

    I'm origially from Midwest, but have been in South for so long that most of my accent and words come from down here (SC). My kids sound like true Southerners. LOL

    We were traveling a few weeks ago and somebody at a convenience store commented on our Southern accent...she said, "WOW...can't hide that you guys are from the South"
     
  7. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Funny. I took a PD historical walking tour of NYC last month. Our guide told us the story of a man he had met on an Ellis Island trip. The man was from TX. He had come to the USA YEARS ago as an immigrant. He had a paper with him when he got off his boat- the paper said 'Houston' so the immigration people put him on a train to TX. He didn't know anyone there but got a job working on a ranch. He now has his own ranch, has investments in the oil industry and has had a very successful life. Turns out, though, that the paper which said 'Houston' was so he would be directed to Houston St in NYC where he had relatives!! :woot:
     
  8. knitter63

    knitter63 Groupie

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    In NE Ohio, we have been accused of ending all of our sentences in a preposition!
     
  9. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    My sister once told a friend from Texas that she "took a digger" and he was very confused. (That's a WI phrase for falling on your face...)
     
  10. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    Funny I should rediscover this thread today... I was considering starting a similar one.

    There's a few I've noticed a lot around here lately (or anywhere I've had the opportunity to discuss education with Americans).

    Curriculum - Here it refers to the document put out by the provincial board of education that has specific goals (or outomces) for students in each grade and in each subject... as opposed to a packaged "resource" which is what many seem to call a curriculum.

    Also, something I constantly translate when I'm on here... substitute teachers are called "supply teachers". As a supply teacher, you are placed on the supply list, which admittedly does get confusing when you're talking about the lists that are sent home at the end of the year for school supplies for the follow year... which are also called supply lists.

    Another thing that I would never have noticed except I had a friend laugh one time, when I told her I was teaching grade three. Apparently it's bizarre to not use ordinal numbers to describe grades in the US? Weird :lol: It was really brought to my attention when the Sisters were doing a conference here, and they had to correct themselves... as if we wouldn't understand the difference between second grade and grade two :lol:

    Also... out of curiosity, what are these?

    [​IMG]
     
  11. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Those, halfateacher, are binders, of course. What are these?

    [​IMG]

    As the label says, we call them "duo-tangs".

    And, of course, I used to be a supply teacher and I teach grade 7 and 8.
     
  12. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    Aren't those binders?!?

    Mrs. C... I have no idea... I was thinking a folder...
     
  13. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    That explains why I can never find duotangs online!!! Yes, they are duotangs, NOT folders :lol:

    I was so confused when people would refer to binders as "notebooks"... ummm no, notebooks are different.
     
  14. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    What halfateacher posted is a binder, what MrsC posted is a duotang, and a notebook is a spiral. :)
     
  15. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    These are notebooks...
    [​IMG]
     
  16. WannaTeach

    WannaTeach Companion

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    INTeacher, I loved seeing that someone else called a Coke or Pepsi a "drink". I grew up in northeastern NC and we said drink and nabs. I now live in western NC and I have a hard time saying "fixin'". That drives me nuts. Lots of people here say "soda" for a "drink". If I say I need a drink meaning a Coke, they think I need a beer or something. How funny!
     
  17. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    Mrs. C that looks like a workbook to me.
     
  18. fishkafoon

    fishkafoon Rookie

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    Grew up in Southeast Missouri where teachers were certified and had paraprofessionals. In Washington, teachers are certificated and have paraeducators.

    During my brother-in-law's first visit, he had no idea what ouchonder (out yonder), numbraytditch (number eight ditch), or chitlin (chitlin!) meant. He had no idea what a "mess of fish" were, too. I always understood it to mean a fair amount of fish.

    His parents were visiting as well. The parents exchanged gifts. Mom and dad received a wood carving and smoked salmon, respectively. When it came to giving my sister's father-in-law's gift, he and his wife smiled but appeared puzzled as they expressed their appreciation . My dad gave him a cap which had the image of a chef across the front with the caption "Champion Chitlin Cooker - It takes a lot of guts." They giggled about it. My brother-in-law turned to his dad and asked, "You know what a chitlin is, right?" His mom piped up and said, "Of course we know. It's a baby chicken." Yep, we cracked up at that quip. Thankfully, they didn't offend easily at the humor or the explanation of the inner workings of a pig. :p
     
  19. WannaTeach

    WannaTeach Companion

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    I grew up saying "carts" at the grocery store. But, when I lived in Arkansas for a few years, everyone said "buggies". I still say "buggies" today. My mother says "boot" for the "trunk" of a car. My husband says "fixin'" and likes livermush which is different from liver pudding? Is this an western NC thing? We didn't eat that stuff in NE NC. :p Just give me a drink and a pack of nabs.
     
  20. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Mrs C, those are definitely workbooks or blue books.
     
  21. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    Again, my DH from CA moves to NC and his first job is bagging groceries at the Big Star. His first day, bags up the groceries, heads out the parking lot with little old lady who tells him to put the groceries "in the boot."

    He thought he had moved to a different country :lol:
     
  22. WannaTeach

    WannaTeach Companion

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    I can just imagine!! :lol:
     
  23. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

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    Sorry I missed this. Sociolinguistics fascinates me. Even though Delaware is a tiny state, I learned in college that the northern and southern DE dialects are distinct that the sociolinguistic line that separates North and South runs right through Delaware - linguists can't categorize it as a state - one county goes North and the other two go south. And now I live in Central PA where the dialect is described as "dutchy" which is the Anglicized German that the Amish and others in the area speak.

    We always said subs for sandwiches. Here I see subs or hoagies. I also always said stuffing for what you put in the turkey, with dressing as an acceptable alternative. But here they say "filling." Also people here say "awhile" at the end of every sentence. "You want me to put your milk in a bag awhile?" "I think I am going to go start dinner awhile." I used to think it was just something my BF said but when I moved I realized everyone says it up here.

    We also argue over what pot pie is, but I think that is more a part of food culture than lingual culture. lol.
     
  24. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    You argue about what pot pie is??? What else could it be, other than a pie with some sort of meat and vegetables and sauce within it's lovely flaky crust?
     
  25. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

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    In central PA, pot pie is what I would call Chicken and Dumplings - big floppy noodles with chicken and a sauce.

    He says the stuff with the crust is just chicken pie - POT pie is a pie you make in a pot, therefore it has noodles instead of crust. Makes sense, but it's still wrong. lol.

    Then we get into an argument about what dumplings are. Here they eat drop dumplings, which my grandmother used to make. But my other nana and my mom make the rolled out slippery dumplings, which are essentially big floppy noodles like what they call pot pie noodles here. lol.

    We jokingly get into an "argument" about this like once a week.
     
  26. EDUK8_ME

    EDUK8_ME Cohort

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    True, it is a negative reference to the city of Detroit.
     
  27. TeacherShelly

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    My Indiana grandma used to say, "Good Night!" when anything surprised/disgusted her. Like my brother's girlfriend wearing too short of shorts to a family reunion, "Well, good night!"
     
  28. mom2mikey

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    I'm in Southern Alberta, Canada in a farming community. I'm thinking more of words that people don't always recognize when I use them because they are words that are kind of specific to our farming community (although I think they are used in other farming communitie).

    A "pivot" is a sprinkler system used in fields. The system has a central point in the middle of the field and the pipes on wheels pivot around that point to water the entire field. (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/17/PivotIrrigationOnCotton.jpg)

    A "quanset" is a large shed that farmers put up. (http://www.agr.state.il.us/spacerental/facility/images/misc/quonset.jpg)

    A "coulee" is something that a lot of people don't seem know either. It is sort of a canyon. Although I would think there are other areas where they know what a coulee is becuase of things like grand COULEE dam ;).
     
  29. Cerek

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    Jul 18, 2010

    "Lord willing and the creek don't rise" - a Southern farewell.

    "I'll see ya in a day or two, Lord willing and the creek don't rise." :)
     
  30. Rachael84

    Rachael84 Rookie

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    My first graders called each other snitches a lot. This was in the hood though, so I don't know if they do this in other parts of the city. Yeah, even as 6 year olds, they would say "Snitches get stitches"
     
  31. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

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    I HATE that phrase. I have really gone off on some rants when I hear the kids say that. They know I don't like it.
     
  32. Teachling

    Teachling Groupie

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    VERY interesting! Thanks, will have to share that one.
     
  33. KinderCowgirl

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    I say that too-or if I'm really aggravated "Good night Irene, Hello beebee". Don't even ask me where I got that from, I have no idea! :)

    I've really enjoyed reading all the different sayings. Silverspoon- your "awhile" reminded me of one we used to hear all the time when I lived in PA (and this was the Penn. Dutch country. They would end their sentences with "naw" (now). "come on, naw-get in the car", "how's it going naw". Oh, the good old days! ;)
     
  34. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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  35. JustMe

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    I hear a lot of "questionable" phrases relating to the weather and temperature.

    Colder than a well digger's a___.
    Colder than a witch's t___.
    Hotter than a wh___ in church.

    Things of that nature. But like so many things, I have no idea if they're regional or not. I just know I don't repeat them! :)
     
  36. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    To expand on JustMe's post... In Canada, we have a show called Corner Gas (it's been over for a few years now, but still on in reruns)... on it, Hank says something is "colder than a witches mitt." Makes me laugh every time.
     
  37. teacher333

    teacher333 Devotee

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    And don't forget - we put "sprinkles" on our ice cream cones in NJ, not "jimmies"! Unless that is just a North Jersey thing?:haha:
     
  38. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    It's metro NYC and LI as well.
     
  39. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    We put sprinkles on down here, too!
     
  40. teachsph2008

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    Jul 18, 2010

    I live in Texas, but originally from southern California.

    In Cali we put our groceries in a shopping cart..in Texas, it's a buggy.

    In Cali all the freeways/highways always had an article in front...for example..the 91...the 15

    In Texas it's just..take 59 or take 10.

    And to this day, I still don't understand what a loop is lol. Folks will say, it's on loop such and such.
     

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