What Are Some Terms Native To Your Region

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by KinderCowgirl, Jul 14, 2010.

  1. Teachling

    Teachling Groupie

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    I must say I feel lucky to have had exposure to so many cultures. It's endearing - the various quirks, traditions or just the ways. Isn't it great to live in America & be expose to so many cultures?
     
  2. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Davenport and chesterfield...totally new words to me! :)
     
  3. silver rain

    silver rain Comrade

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    Growing up I heard in rural Texas:

    People from the north who winter in south Texas are
    called "snowbirds."

    A "beer joint" is a bar.
     
  4. Kangaroo22

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    I've always called it a hassock.
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    a type of circular junction in which road traffic must travel in one direction around a central island. Signs usually direct traffic entering the circle to slow down and give the right of way to drivers already in the circle.
     
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Come on ova, we'll have some cawfee.
     
  7. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    Yep, we have those. And the few times it gets down below freezing it's a "Juice Killer" because everyone will be out in the groves, trying to save the citrus trees.

    We're never ready to do something nor fixin' to do it, either - we're fittin' to do it.

    There's no such thing as a child - we say chil' with a real long i.

    Palm Beach on down South isn't "real" Florida - it's been citified by North'ners who are scared of gators, cottonmouths, and rattlers.

    Calling someone a cracker is derogatory, but a Florida Cracker is an heritage to be proud of.

    Yonder was something I heard a lot in North Florida.

    My brother & I both use a Southern accent when taking to friends, a "pure" accent when speaking at work/school, a NE PA (Heynabonics anyone?) accent when talking to my dad, and had a Brooklyn accent when talking to my mom. We never realized we did this until college.
     
  8. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    My brother bought me a coffee set for Christmas one year - including cups labled "cawfee," a "creamuh," and a "sugah" bowl. My Southern friends think they're hysterical.
     
  9. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    :rofl:
     
  10. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    A party store is a convenience store without a gas station. All my NC friends though I was referring to a place like Party City.
    I wonder if the difference is the fact that you have to buy liquor from the state ran liquor store here in NC. Where in MI, you go to the party store to get it!
     
  11. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    You are so right. Plus it's so fun to have family that lives in different parts of the country that pick up the quirks.

    We saw our niece from Tennessee & hubby couldn't understand her... LOL!!!
     
  12. midwestteacher

    midwestteacher Cohort

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    Growing up in NC, we ate three meals a day - breakfast, dinner, and supper.
    All sodas are drinks or cokes, don't ask for a pop unless you want one "upside your head."
    "Bless her heart" usually means she is so addled that she couldn't pour water out of a boot with directions on the heel.
    We have couches in our dens and buggies in the grocery store.
    A child that is misbehaving might be told that they are "about to be snatched baldheaded!" Or they might "get the tar beat out of them."
    We have peCAN pie, not peCAHN pie.
    In NC, we have Beaufort (Bo-fort) and in SC we have Beaufort (Bew-fort).
     
  13. glen

    glen Companion

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    In MA, it's a rotary.
     
  14. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Been to Homestead/Redland lately? That's still "real" Florida. It's still primarily farmland/agri-business, and very much old time Florida. We even still have a pharmacy with a breakfast/lunch counter and feed stores dotted all over the place.
     
  15. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    Someone mentioned going "up north" on vacation--my parents grew up in Milwaukee (pronounced Mwaukee :)), but moved to central WI when we were little. One of my dad's coworkers (who also moved up here) loved the fact that now he lived "up north." I went to college back near Milwaukee, and loved it when people told me about their family's cottage "up north," which was actually near my home town.

    We had couches in our living rooms. In Milwaukee or far northern WI you drank soda; in the middle of the state you drank pop. At school I get a drink from a bubbler--but that really confuses my students now that I live in southern Indiana! (Also known as Kentuckiana, as someone said, which I just found hilarious when I moved here...).

    My fuse box here is actually labeled with "dishwarsher" and "warsher/dryer." People here eat "westerns," not sloppy joes. My students don't have "cold lunch," they just "brought it from home" (not to be confused with a "sack lunch", which is what you take on a field trip).

    The other teachers make fun of me for saying 'root' with the same vowel sound as 'book,' and think it's absolutely hilarious that I only use one syllable when I say words like "fruit"!
     
  16. midwestteacher

    midwestteacher Cohort

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    We don't have sloppy joes here in Missouri - they are juicy burgers.

    Back home in NC, we have skeeters, not mosquitoes.
    The snotty rich folks that come down to the coast during the summer from Raleigh, Durham, Charlotte, etc are called Dingbatters by the locals.

    People in eastern NC can be "momicked" or abused. "That poor cat was just momicked by that dog."
     
  17. goopp

    goopp Devotee

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    I grew up in Pittsburgh. I always say you can tell if someone is from Pgh, because they know what a gumband is. That is the only place I know where they say gumband instead of rubber band.
     
  18. AMK

    AMK Aficionado

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    I have a strong Jersey accent according to my husband

    When I call to order a pizza I don't say I want to order a pizza I say "a large pie with cheese"
     
  19. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

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    My husband was from Washington State. When we moved to Georgia, he wanted some extra income. He responded to an ad in the paper for someone to help cut wood to sell. The telephone conversation was hilarious.

    "I'm sorry. What did you say I needed? A pee cup?" Husband looks at me in confusion. Whispers, "What's a pee cup?"

    I'm confused. "He wants you to have a pee cup? Ask him what he means."

    Then I hear "to haul urine? What? You want to know if I have a pee cup to haul urine?"

    My father, who had been listening to the whole exchange got it first and almost had a stroke laughing so hard. "He means a pickup to haul yours in. Your share of the wood. Do you have a pickup to haul your'n...."
     
  20. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

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    I had an argument over what geographical LI was. I told a Queens native she was on Long Island they told me no way! Brooklyn & Queens were not part of Long Island, after I pointed out she had to cross a bridge, go through a tunnel Or take a ferry to leave and She did not cross any body of water to get to Nassau and Suffolk SHE STILL said Nassau and Suffolk were an island to them selves.

    I have heard carbonated drinks called Coke, Soda, Soda Pop, and Pop
    When I moved to NY from CA I called a woods a forest and was laughed at.
     
  21. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    :lol::lol::lol:
     
  22. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    Oh, I have been there. It's like a slice of home :) I think that mentality stems from a) pride in Old Florida and b) some regional contempt for visitors who think all of Florida is South Beach. If they're looking for glitz, they need to keep heading south :)
     
  23. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

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    How many states call the northern part upstate? I know NY does but I have heard that other states do.
     
  24. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    In Texas, the northern part of the state is called "the Panhandle".
     
  25. buck8teacher

    buck8teacher Devotee

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    In my area (Southwestern Ohio), often if we don't understand something that was said/can't here it we say "please?". When I went away to college in KY, people were always like "Please what?"

    The town I grew up in has a big Southern influence so things like ya'll, fixin', etc....are pretty common around here.

    However a three way refers to a plate of spaghetti, chili, and cheese around here.
     
  26. iheart5thgrade

    iheart5thgrade Comrade

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    My roommate in college was from Michigan and I remember her laughing at me when I called them "buggies" at the grocery store instead of "shopping carts."

    She also laughed when I would want to put on my toboggan before I went outside in the winter. She said that was a sled.

    I've always heard that when you have a quick shiver a "rabbit run over your grave." That always made my roommate laugh because she had never heard that phrase.
     
  27. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    I always thought a toboggan was for more than 2 people & sled was 1 to 2.

    I was told the quick shiver means someone walked over your grave.

    HOw many held your breath going by a cemetary?!?!?
     
  28. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Because it's impolite to breathe in front of people who can't??

    I haven't heard that one in years!!!:D
     
  29. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    We hold our breath when going past a cemetery, and we raise our feet when crossing railroad tracks!
     
  30. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

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    We raise our feet when crossing a cattle guard
     
  31. maya5250

    maya5250 Comrade

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    Are hush puppies common outside of the southern states?

    Phrases from the south:

    Egged on

    Hankering for something

    Heap of dirt

    Lickety split

    I reckon.....

    Sho 'Nuff

    Skedaddle

    I wasn't spanked growing up. I was whooped.

    I haven't heard this phrase in a while: Why don’t you just take a long walk off a short pier

    He’s not particularly intelligent.

    Mean as a snake

    Stubborn as a mule

    Heard this phrase a lot from my parents when I was growing up: If you don't stop, I will slap the black off you. (meaning if my siblings and I didn't stop what ever we were doing, we were going to get a whooping). Now, I was a smart mouth growing up. So, I asked my parents how is it possible to do this. Yeah, I never asked again. :lol:

    He done good

    Pull up your drawers. (meaning pull up your pants)
     
  32. maya5250

    maya5250 Comrade

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    Also growing up, we raised our feet when crossing railroad tracks and not step on sidewalk cracks because it was bad luck.
     
  33. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

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    A toboggan is a sled
    A toboggan Cap is what goes on your head, as per my grandma, when you are sledding
     
  34. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    I don't even know why...but hated those who drove really slow by them...LOL!!!

    I know a tobaggon is a sled...from here it's a big sled... it also *the old ones* have a curve in front where sleds don't...not many I"ve been on.
     
  35. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    Oh a "saucer" for the circular sleds.
     
  36. chicagoturtle

    chicagoturtle Fanatic

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    Born and Raised In Florida- Spent Summer In NC- Went to school in Wisconsin- Live in Chicago- so I've learned lots of odd things.

    Florida
    Soda
    Subs or Sandwiches
    Tennis shoes (all athletic shoes)

    North Carolina
    Y'all = You All
    Fixin to is used a lot


    Wisconsin (with in my first few minutes of arrival someone asked me where the bubbler and Time Machine (later I found out it was TYME- (TAKE YOUR MONEY EVERYWHERE)- thought I was nuts!
    Water Fountain = Bubbler
    Soda = Pop
    TYME machine = ATM
    Closer to the northern border/ Minnesota peoples vowels get really long so it's Minnesoooooooooota, they also say "you betcha"

    Chicago
    Urban Slang- Kids don't ask to go to the bathroom they simply tell you, "I gotta use it!"
    Gym Shoes = all athletic shoes
    Cash Station = ATM
    No one uses the terms street, avenue, etc- people simply say the name like Ashland, Damen, Western- People will also respond to you with the "coordinates" of the street- such as 2000 N, 2000 W etc.
    Soda and Pop go depending on who you talk to.
    Our train is the "EL" even most people refer to the subway parts as the EL-
    People put DA in front of things like Da Mayor, Da Bears
    People might tell you "it might could" or "it might should"

    I'm sure there are more....
     
  37. chicagoturtle

    chicagoturtle Fanatic

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    We have a few restauraunts mainly in the predominantly African American communities that sell them- The resturaunts are chains (at least locally) called JJ Fish.
     
  38. chicagoturtle

    chicagoturtle Fanatic

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    Your picture reminds me of the Chicago Style Hot Dog- I don't personally eat hot dogs- but you best NOT Ask for Ketchup and it includes like a salad on top of your dog and celery salt and a pickle spear!

    apparently I am incapable of pasting an image.
     
  39. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

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    we called them A package store, a convenience store that sells a lot of alcohol
     
  40. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    I'm a yankee and I know what a pocketbook is!
     

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