What Are Some Terms Native To Your Region

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by KinderCowgirl, Jul 14, 2010.

  1. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    mmswm reminded me in another thread, "Well, I declare!" or "Well, I do declare!" is a phrase that may be more old than regional but something I hear and say. We don't ever declare anything...we just leave it at "Well, I declare" when we're surprised by something. Kind of like when I say, "Well, I'll be." I never elaborate. :D
     
  2. TennisPlayer

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    Yeah, I remember my grandparents saying "it's on the davenport" too.

    Anyways, I remember when I visited a casual restaurant in Philidelphia (first time in the NE part of the U.S.) they laughed when I said "what kind of pop do you have?" He asked where I was from!

    So, I say pop because that's what I'm used to hearing in my family.
     
  3. CanadianTeacher

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    We say pop for carbonated drinks here too, at least in my small part of the country.
     
  4. JustMe

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    So what's a davenport?
     
  5. gigi

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    We say wicked cool! and drop a lot of our "r".I had a teacher friend who would yell at me for saying cah, not car. sorry!
     
  6. KinderCowgirl

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    That's just hilarious!!! :lol:

    I remember Rob Thomas of Matchbox 20 talking about their song "Bent". They traveled the word singing it on tour and didn't realize it meant so many different things depending on where they were-crazy, gay, crooked, etc.
     
  7. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    In reference to whomever said "I" is prounouced "uh"....The old folk in Miami pronounce it "Mi-am-uh". Even as a Miami native, that just never sounded right to me.
     
  8. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Couch, sofa, chesterfield.
     
  9. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    That was me, mm... you know that drawl I'm talking about. Huh. Never heard Miami called Miamuh. Though it hurts my ears when people say "O-keeeee-cho-bee"
     
  10. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    I think my grandmother's generation is the last of those who said that. My mom doesn't pronounce it that way, but my grandmother never said it any other way. If you go down into the Homestead/Redland area, and go hang out that the pharmacy breakfast counter, that's all you'll hear.
     
  11. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    The Barrel is the trash. The water fountain is the bubbeler. An ice cream shake is a frappe.
     
  12. Cerek

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    A few more from the South.

    "passle" means a lot. There was a whole passle of kids at the pool today. ("passles" only come in whole portions. There's no such thing as "half a passle").

    "spittin snow" means "a very light flurry". Flakes are falling just enough to notice, but not enough to actually do anything. I never thought about that one till one of my home health patients got tickled at me for sayin it. She said "Are we going to get snow tonight". I said "Could be. I dunno, but it's been spittin snow all mornin." :D

    I go see movies at the thee-ater.

    I usually combine "Bless his/her heart" and "God bless them" into "God bless his/her heart", which means the person has just acted like a jerk or an idiot (or both).

    Some old timers still say "I Swanee" instead of "I swear" or they may just shorten it to "Well I Swan"

    We say cuss words.

    Most cuss words can have 1 or 2 syllables (sometimes more). One syllable indicates the normal use/meaning of the word. Two (or more) syllables is used as an expression of disbelief or amazement, depending on the situation.

    We don't like to take the Lord's name in vain, so we'll say "Gol-darn" or "Gol-dang" instead. We might also say "dag-nabbit" when we're frustrated.

    We usually have breakfast, lunch and supper. If you invite someone for dinner, they ain't sure when ta show up. :confused:

    "just up the road a-ways" means it isn't that far. Of course, distance is relevant, since locals might consider anything between 1-5 miles to be "a-ways".

    A "good bit" is a little farther than "a-ways".

    If'n it's too far, we'll just say "you can't get there from here".
     
  13. Joyful!

    Joyful! Habitué

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    Yeah, I know some old timers who are from Mi am uh. It has not carried on to the next generations though. As to Okeechobee, you are definitely correct. Many of them also play GIT tar and others will go muddin.

    I like to hear the differnt (another pronunciation for different, unfortunately) ways that people speak. I reckon I'll just set a spell and wait for some more of these regional beauties!
     
  14. DizneeTeachR

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    Cerek... we use spittin up here. Like in it's spitting snow... I use it with rain as well. My dad will say is it raining there...just spitting.
     
  15. INteacher

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    Cerek - you are sure making me miss North Carolina :) My family has never forgiven me for raising yankees here in Indiana :)

    "I swanee to goodness" is one of my regular cuss words as is "Son of a Biscuit"

    And how about you carry me to the store? :)
     
  16. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    I don't know if this was local to just my small area, because I never really heard it outside extreme South Dade, but a "Frog Drowner" is a downpour that hits suddenly and dumps and inch or so in a short period of time, then lets up again or clears completely.

    Frog Drowners are associated with another South Florida phenomenon called ponding. Because so much water comes down so suddenly, it takes a while for the drainage systems to catch up. That results in short term street flooding, or mini-ponds, in the streets.
     
  17. maya5250

    maya5250 Comrade

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    "It looks like the bottom is about to drop" - when it is about to start raining a lot. I know it is said a lot in NC
     
  18. GG Fan

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    I had a professor in college and I think he said he was from NY. He kept talking about "worter" and I could not figure out what on earth he was talking about. Water! He was talking about water.

    When I was growing up we always called grilled cheese sandwiches "cheese toasties". I assumed everyone called them that until I got to college and my friends had no idea what I was talking about. Apparently cheese toasties is a family term!
     
  19. GG Fan

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    Ottoman or footstool? My grandma has an ottoman that she pulls up to the davenport.
     
  20. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    Do we have the same gma?!?! LOL!!!!
     
  21. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    In Michigan, we go 'up north' for the weekend. It generally means you will be going camping or to a cabin somewhere in rural Michigan north of Flint/Grand Rapids- many times on one to the lakes. It typically doesn't mean the Upper Peninsula- that would be going to the UP. Occasionally, it the destination doesn't actually even have to be much to the north- it could be more east or west.

    In the Charlotta NC area, you go to the beach. Which would be the Atlantic coast- most often Myrtle Beach. (Where as I would refer to it as the ocean, because lakes have beaches- I am a Michigander!)

    Yoopers live in the UP of Michigan. Hence the name.

    In NC, you cut things on and off (as opposed to turn them on or off). It is "I cut on the TV" instead of "I turned on the TV".

    In MI you drive on the expressway. In NC, it is the interstate. I actually work with someone who had NO idea what I was talking about when I said expressway.

    Southerners 'fuss', where as my yankee self 'yells' or 'chews out'.
     
  22. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    Not really a thing to say, but meeting people from Michigan who use their had to show you different parts of it!!! LOL!!!
     
  23. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Diznee, Sorry, it'a late and I'm tired.

    But that made no sense to me-- what did you mean???
     
  24. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    How people use their hands for the lower peninsula.... you know "The Mitten?"
     
  25. Teachling

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    Really? I remember a time that if you weren't from Manhattan you were from the 'sticks". Opps , shut up! :lol:
     
  26. ChristyF

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    I forgot about swanee! Gram used to say that all the time. :)
     
  27. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Oh, another extreme south florida thing...You have the "left coast" and the "right coast". The right coast is the Atlantic Ocean/Biscayne Bay side, and the left coast is the Gulf of Mexico.
     
  28. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    There you have it: Einstein's theory of relativity!
    It's all a matter of perspective!

    (plus, since 9/11, an awful lot of former Manhattanites have re-thought that particular philosophy.)
     
  29. Teachling

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    My experience has been that when you are from Michigan, the hand quickly goes up to show you what area they are from in relations to the state. :D
     
  30. DizneeTeachR

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    See I knew people knew what I meant when you meet someone from Michigan... LOL!!! It's funny people say do you know someone from the East/West side of the state as well...then usually the hand. LOL!!!
     
  31. Teachling

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    Diznee, I overlooked your post! How true! I just encountered this once again on my last visit to the Apple store 2 days ago! That is too funny! Definitely a culture thing! Once a upon a time, wasn't there some saying or bummer sticker that said (Michigan) "last one out turn the lights off" :lol:
     
  32. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    Not sure?!?!
     
  33. TeacherShelly

    TeacherShelly Aficionado

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    Yankees in Indiana, huh? My Indiana family is more Kentuckiana, I think. "Cincinnatuh," err for hour, Mamaw & Papaw for grandparents, sugars for kisses/hugs, fixin' to, etc.
     
  34. Teachling

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    This apparently was during the era that everyone was leaving MI, probably before your time & mine! :p
     
  35. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    Could be...
     
  36. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    My best friend in high school sometimes called a really bad thunderstorm a "thunder-buster".

    When we got a hard rain, my dad would say "It's rainin like a cow p****n on a flat rock". I sometimes say "We're fixin to be like Flat Rock, AK" when I see dark storm clouds building up.

    "Time to call in the dogs and p*** on the fire" means it's time to leave or go home.

    When I was in college, I sometimes "stayed up till the cows come home" (pulled an all-nighter).

    My grandma used to say her legs were "wobbly as a newborn calf" and when she was getting ready for bed, she was "just gettin easy".

    "Just gettin at myself" means that you are just starting to feel better after being sick. If you're still sick, then you "ain't at yerself"

    "gripes my taters" is something that aggravates me.

    There are several expressions that mean someone isn't very smart......
    "He ain't the (sharpest knife in the drawer), (brightest bulb in the hall), (brightest lamp in the house), (sharpest tool in the shed)" etc.

    "He is (3 biscuits short of a dozen), (2 beers short of a six-pack), (a few eggs short of a basket), (ain't runnin on all 6 cylinders), (ain't got all his ducks in a row), (is crazier than bat s*** /you can also drive somebody bat-s*** crazy/), (crazy as a loon)" etc.

    "Goose" means tickle. "She came up behind me and goosed me", "Maybe I should reach over there and goose you one time".

    Young kids used to say "cool beans" to mean something was good or they agreed with it.

    My mom grew up in the Hanging Dog community.

    Another community called Brasstown has a "Possum Drop" every New Year's Eve. (PETA didn't like that when they heard about it, even though the animal is lowered slowly and safely in a special-built plexiglass cage/enclosure).

    Southern Colloquial Arsenal has several other phrases. I haven't heard all of them, but some are very common round these parts.

    meaner than a strip-ped snake
    worth a hoot
    slicker than owl s***
    limber as a dishrag
    finer than frog hair
    crazy like a fox
    I don't trust her/him any farther than I could throw her/him
    stove up - means your muscles hurt bad, usually in your legs or back. "I fell down the steps the other day and now I'm all stove up"
    heeby-jeebies
    new fangled
    high falutin
    get-up (outfit)

    I've known people that were "ugly as homemade sin", I've seen others that were "beat with an ugly stick" and even run across a couple that were so ugly "they would make a freight train take a dirt road".

    I knew some kids that were so ugly, their parents had to tie a steak around their neck to get the dogs to play with them and some were born so ugly the doctor slapped their mama.

    Other popular phrases...

    nervous as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rockin chairs
    madder than a wet hen
    busier than a one-armed paper-hanger

    "squirrely" means "acting strange" or "crazy". (Watch a squirrel next time you see one in the road. You never know till the last second which way they're gonna run and they sometimes cut back right in front of you).

    "gussied up" means a woman has had her hair fixed, put on lots of make-up and is wearing a fancy outfit.

    "He needed killin" - well, he did.
     
  37. WaProvider

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    I grew up in midwest.....but now I live in Washington State. We pronounce all most all our letters here.....even "button" and "swinging" have all the sounds. We don't put the extra sounds in either.....I grew up saying "warsh" for wash and "hamma" for hammer.

    We drink "a pop", we eat "sub sandwiches", we swim in "swim suits" not bathing suits, we sleep in "sleeping bags" not slumber bags.

    One thing that has always made me think is the use of brook, creek/crik, stream, rivelet? Anyone have a good grasp of these?
     
  38. Teachling

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    From the south, I remember something to the effect of I'm fe-na to go (means the same as I'm fixin' to go). To this day, it still makes me smile.

    Here's a pic of the philly attitude:

    [​IMG]
     
  39. Southern JC

    Southern JC Companion

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    If I could choose any accent, it would be the Jersey accent. Absolutely love it! :haha:
     
  40. INteacher

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    Jul 14, 2010

    Lord, huney, according to my family my girls are yankees because

    *they don't know what a pocketbook is
    *they have never taken a BC for the headache
    *they have never put peanuts in their coke
    *no popeye's fried chicken
    *they hate grits :(
     

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