What Are Some Terms Native To Your Region

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by KinderCowgirl, Jul 14, 2010.

  1. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    I moved to Texas probably 10 years ago from Pennsylvania and was just thinking about some of the differences in language.

    fixin' (which I know is a Southern thing in general)-you're going to do it, like "I'm fixin' to go to the store".

    wreck - we don't call them car accidents-there was a "wreck" on the freeway today.

    In Pennsylvania we didn't have subs (like sandwiches) they were "hoagies".

    What are some phrases or words that are different for your region?
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    New Jersey here:

    Sometimes we say 'Jersey', not 'New Jersey'

    They are 'traffic circles', not roundabouts

    It's a sub, not a hoagie or a hero. (Although that kind of depends on where you are in NJ, if you are in South Jersey, it might be a hoagie-which is Phillie influenced)

    We drink soda, not pop

    We don't go to the beach, we go down the shore
     
  4. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

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    I talk about dialects and colloquialisms when we talk about the history of the English language in my Brit lit class--I'm fascinated with it, and if I had the time and opportunity, I'd love to study linguistics!

    Back in CT, we don't call them subs--we call them "grinders." And when I was in college, a dorm party wasn't a mixer, it was a "shoot." I had a roommate from MA who didn't use the water fountain; she got a drink from the "bubbler."

    Fun stuff!
     
  5. chemteach55

    chemteach55 Connoisseur

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    We say ya'll instead of you guys like in the North.

    In New Orleans, they make groceries instead of going grocery shopping.
     
  6. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    All carbonated beverages around here are referred to as "Coke".

    The side road leading to the "freeway" (express way/highway)entrance is called the "feeder".

    To "tump" is to spill.

    That's all I can think of right now. I'm "fixin'" to go look for some more. :)
     
  7. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    Since I've always lived in the same area, I don't really know that many. It's all "normal" to me. Everybody sounds like I do. However, anytime I travel people comment on my accent, and I've seen people give each other looks when I say something.

    I'm mostly "southern" in my speaking, but my region is "hillbilly southern". Lucky me gets the most uneducated sounding dialect of them all.

    My DH is from another region of the state, and he stays things much differently than I do. He calls moths "candle flies", and a hard rain is a "pour down".
     
  8. Cateacher2b

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    I don't find too many differences here except in their pronunciation. For example, the city of Hurricane is pronounced hurricun and the city of Hooper is pronounced Huper. Also it's not cutting in line it's "budging".
     
  9. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I live ON Long Island, not IN it!!!!

    For us, it's a hero sandwich with a soda.

    We go to the Beach, unless we're heading down to the Jersey Shore.

    I drive on the Northern State or the Southern State, omitting the word "Parkway" both sides. And, as EVERY Long Islander knows, Parkways are NOT for commercial trucks-- for that you take an Expressway. (commercial trucks, on a fairly regular basis, make this mistake. They can't fit under the overpasses on the Parkways, and it's a problem!!!)

    Manhattan is "the city"-- any other part of NYC is referred to by its boro (Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, the Bronx) Oh, and geography aside, if you're from "the Island" you're from Nassau or Suffolk, not Queens or Brooklyn.
     
  10. Erin Elizabeth

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    Around here, our "The City" is San Francisco.
     
  11. CanadianTeacher

    CanadianTeacher Groupie

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    The biggest one I can think of right now is when you guys talk about 'subs' as it substitute teachers, we call them supply teachers or 'supplies'. We do say 'eh' in Canada and I get caught saying it quite a bit.
     
  12. glen

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    I live in MA, but grew up in Jersey. Wicked is used endlessly as an adjective around here- wicked tired, wicked late, wicked headache, wicked easy...

    It took me a while to figure out what a bubbler was, and I had never heard of a sub being referred to as a grinder before I moved here. There must be others, but after living here for twenty years, it sounds 'normal' to me!
     
  13. JustMe

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    Doesn't everyone say fixin' to, or maybe fixing to? And doesn't everyone call it a wreck?

    In my advanced writing course I wrote a memoir and mentioned a wasper. The professor was confused. Thankfully several people in the class knew exactly what I was talking about and called it the same. But apparently it's called a wasp. This got us off topic and the professor, not from the region, said he'd noticed several differences. When he asked students where they were from, they'd tell them which county. He said in the state he was from, you don't really identify with your county.

    I sometimes say I'll do something directly, as in "Yes, husband, I'll wash the dishes directly." I don't know if that's regional or just old talk. I tell my students to come again if I need them to repeat something.

    *Okay, so I did a little Google search and yep, things I thought were normal might not be. Or maybe these lists are silly. Who doesn't call it a red light? I mean, I know it's not always on red, but what else do you call it? The list said traffic signal was the proper term. No one says that. Toboggan was on there, but we've already hashed that out. It's a winter hat, people! :) Mamaw, papaw, crick for creek (I say creek, but...), a thee-ater which I guess some people pronounce thea-ter. Interesting stuff.

    A lot of it is how we actually say the word. My husband, who speaks less...like me, says I butcher oil and two syllable words like green beans and t.v...apparently I make the last syllable into two more! BUT he and his father both say "as four as I'm concerned" instead of "as far as I'm concerned."
     
  14. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Ditto on the above from this Jersey girl!!

    Except I'd call Manhattan 'The City' (notice the caps- it really is the only city for us in the Tri-State area)
     
  15. CanadianTeacher

    CanadianTeacher Groupie

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    I live just outside of town so when I go into the city I just say I'm going into town.
     
  16. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    - Down here, we don't ask where you live - we ask where you stay.
    - Men and boys are both referred to as sir; girls and women younger than you are miss; women older than you and married women are ma'am.
    - We have creeks, not cricks.
    - We have soda, not pop
    - Shopping carts are buggies.
    - Subs, grinders, hoagies... they're all sandwiches
    - Y'all can refer to two or more people in a group, whereas all y'all refers to everyone in a group
    - Ain't is perfectly acceptable in casual conversation
    - No word ends in a g
    - Alligators can be found in encyclopedias. Gators are found in your yard
    - We don't have tourists; we have North'ners
    - "I" is pronounced "ah"
     
  17. Pisces_Fish

    Pisces_Fish Fanatic

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    Funny, I was thinking about starting this thread the other day! I'm from RI, been in NC 2 years.

    We put things "up," not away
    Kids are youngins
    We call yo' mamma, not your mother
    We drive 30 minutes, not a half hour
    We say, "bless her heart" when someone has done something stupid
     
  18. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Yeah, we put things up, too.
     
  19. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    We also put things "up" and we only measure traveling distance in MINUTES (or hours) not MILES.
     
  20. dogs&teaching

    dogs&teaching Comrade

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    When I lived in St. Louis:

    It was soda.
    Washer was pronounced warsher.
    We had hoosiers.(white trash)

    In Nebraska:

    It's pop.
    We have rednecks and hicks.
     
  21. brigidy

    brigidy Comrade

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    I was thinking the same thing. I grew up in another part of the state, so when I moved here it took me awhile to get used to the pronunciation. For instance I thought everyone was saying the word Markum instead of American. And for the life of me, I couldn't figure out what "rasslin" was - wrestling. For the word heard many will say hear - d (like ear). Instead of wash it's warsh.

    I know when kids act up around here we say "cutting a shine". We still say "yonder".

    I think it is really neat how each area still has its own unique flavor through words and dialect.
     
  22. mdawson

    mdawson Rookie

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    I live in VA and one that really bothers me is when people say "fur" in place of "for".

    "What did you do that fur?"

    I hate that, and people here hate when I correct them!
     
  23. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    NY residents... I have noticed that a lot of people put an r sound on the end of words that end with an a. Do you find that you do that?!?!

    I'm trying to think of some, but mostly just how we pronouce different things like root beer we make the oo sound like the ones heard in book.
     
  24. Pisces_Fish

    Pisces_Fish Fanatic

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    I still say wicked all the time! People think it's weird. You know when I was in 1st grade I got in tons of trouble for saying the Nutcracker was wicked cool. I was in a private school at the time - I never forgot that!
     
  25. CanadianTeacher

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    Around here, something is 'sick' when it's meant to be good or cool. Ex: That's a sick shirt means that's a nice shirt.
     
  26. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    Around here we leave the endings off of lots of words. Most words have a few syllables added in to make up the difference though! :D I used to say you could tell how made I really was by how many syllable I used in hell. lol South Lousiana has more than us (I'm in central LA). One of my friends is from there and still says things like "save the dishes" for washing the dishes and being there for 3:00 instead of at 3:00. Of course I think I talk normal and all of ya'll sound funny! :D
     
  27. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    As a military kid, we moved often and "native speak" was always fun :) As new kids, it was the first things we learned from our peers, kinda like Wierd Words 101

    *rubber when in Canada was an eraser - imagine my surprise my first day in freshman English being asked if I had a rubber my classmate could borrow ;)
    *being ****** meant you were drunk, not mad to my English friends


    All my family is from North Carolina and here's a few
    *a drink and a nab for lunch means a co-cola and packaged crackers
    *doing something "directly" means whenever I get around to it
    *put the word "the" in front ailments - I've got the headache; I've got the backache
    *give me some sugar means giving hugs and kisses
     
  28. Joyful!

    Joyful! Habitué

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    Purdy instead of pretty. When I first moved here, I was told to head to a store on Purdy Lane. (Really). Of course, having made adjustments for the accent, I drove around looking for Pretty Lane. Imagine my surprise when it was truly Purdy Lane :)
     
  29. cutNglue

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    Georgia is pronounced Jawja.
     
  30. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

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    In Maine (family from there) everyone is "deah" for "dear".
    And "ayuh" for "yes" or "I hear you".
    "Moxie" is spirit. He's got a lot of moxie to do that. It's also an awful , horrible drink. For real. Comes in an orange can. Bleech.

    When I was a child, supper was the evening meal. Dinner was the mid-day meal on Sunday. I don't know where I picked that one up.
     
  31. scienceteach82

    scienceteach82 Cohort

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    What is a car circle/roundabout?

    I live in Atlanta...so it's all coke...lol
    Yall
    I say car wreck
    Getting groceries
    Beach
    Sub or po boy
     
  32. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    We probably say beach... but mostly "let's go to the lake."
    We get groceries.
    Subs, grinders
    We say car accident & I think some say wreck
    What soda we want we ask for a Sprite or a Coke. LOL!!!
    I say dinner or supper, I think usually dinner though. You sit at the dinner table.
     
  33. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Here are a few more from around here:

    We say, "go ahead on" instead of "go ahead" or "go on"

    "blue norther" is a sudden storm that drops the temperature dramatically

    Nu-uh is "no"

    And a favorite saying: "Never ask a man if he's from Texas. If he is, he'll tell you on his own. If he ain't, no need to embarrass him."
     
  34. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    It's breakfast, dinner, and supper! :)
     
  35. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    yep for me too :) which caused great confusion for my CA husband. My granny and papa wanted to take him out for "dinner" and of course dh (FI at the time) didn't show up :lol: After 25 yrs, he still just nods and smiles when speaking with my very southern family.

    Another funny - my granny never, ever using curse words but she has many, many angry words. Her favorite is 'John Brown'; she'll say "Who is the world left this John Browned glass in the living room?" My DH "who's John Brown and should I know him?"
     
  36. scienceteach82

    scienceteach82 Cohort

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    Breakfast, lunch, and dinner
     
  37. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    I just can't bring myself to use the word "pop" when refering to a carbonated beverage. It's all coke, no matter the flavor.

    I guess, having grown up in an immigrant rich, and very transient city, My ear became accustomed to multiple words for the same thing.

    I use sofa and couch interchangably, also it can be a car crash, wreck or accident, depending on my mood. Mostly I carry a purse, but every once in a while I grab my pocketbook. My favorite swear word isn't and English word, which is great, because nobody here has any clue what I'm saying when I utter it. Sometimes, women wear panty hose, other times they wear stockings (though I tend towards stockings).

    There's probably more, but I'm just not thinking of them right now.
     
  38. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    That's funny, INteacher!

    I (unfortunately) picked up some angry words from my mamaw that my students have made fun of. :)
     
  39. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    Being genteel Southern Belles around here, when someone does something wrong we will say, "Bless his heart" or "God love him" lol. Sounds sweet, be we know what it really means! Somewhere along the way I picked up the phrase "Lord love a duck." I have no idea where it came from , but I do have parents telling me that their kids will come home and say it. Oops! :D
     
  40. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    A traffic circle.
     
  41. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    I love when my gparents use "davenport." LOL!!!
     

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