What am I qualified to teach?

Discussion in 'New Teachers' started by jessi.lewis, May 13, 2008.

  1. jessi.lewis

    jessi.lewis Rookie

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    May 13, 2008

    This is a pretty specific question, but I am so confused and hoping that SOMEBODY can help me out!

    I have heard everybody throwing around NCLB terms like "highly qualified" and have asked about a million people about what this means specifically, and have gotten about a million answers which basically amount to "nobody really knows."

    So my question is: I have a major in History, and a minor in Sociology. Does this mean I can teach Social Studies, or only History?

    Also, I have my Montana teaching license, and it lists my endorsements as History and Sociology. Does this mean I am "highly qualified" to teach Sociology? If not, can I still teach it while working on an improvement plan (or something like that)?

    It's all so confusing to me, and even re-reading this post I'm not sure it makes sense. Thanks to anyone who has some light to shed! :)

    PS - I should add that Montana has no Praxis test or other required testing in order to obtain a license.
     
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  3. jw13

    jw13 Groupie

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    May 13, 2008

    Check out your state BOE website. On the ISBE, here in IL, you can answer a series of questions on the website, which will let you know if you are "highly qualified" in any given area. It will also let you know what you can do to become "highly qualified". Good Luck!
     
  4. Pisces_Fish

    Pisces_Fish Fanatic

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    May 13, 2008

    I'm not sure how to answer your question, but on my license it has the number "81" near my name, which when you check the back, correlates with "Highly Qualified by an accredited out-of-state teacher education program." (I got my license in RI and transferred it to NC.) There's nothing like this on the back of yours?
     
  5. jessi.lewis

    jessi.lewis Rookie

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    I have looked on the BE site as well as the Montana OPI site. In both cases, I could find nothing helpful... I even did searches of the message boards and nada!

    But thank you very much for your help, and it is nice to know that if I was teaching in Illinois, I would not be having this problem. Haha :)
     
  6. jessi.lewis

    jessi.lewis Rookie

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    May 13, 2008

    Not a thing. The only non-generic thing it has is "CLASS 2 STANDARD" and the number of credits required to renew... ??
     
  7. jw13

    jw13 Groupie

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    Have you tried calling the BE? I know that ISBE website can sometime be overwhelming and not be very clear. I actually had to call someone to show me where I could change my cert. to active/exempt when I stayed home to have my children. But, the people were very knowledgable and helpful. Maybe even try your ROE, they explained the "highly qualified" status to me, since this was a change in the three years that I have been outside of the field.
     
  8. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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  9. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    May 13, 2008

    In Montana:
    Secondary Teachers New to the Profession
    If, as a secondary teacher new to the profession and licensed effective on or after July 1, 2006, you:
    • hold at least a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or university;
    • complete a Montana Board of Public Education accredited professional educator preparation program; and
    • obtain a Montana license, with endorsement based on course preparation related to the subject to be taught (recommendation for licensure and endorsement by an accredited professional educator preparation program),
    Then, you meet Montana's federally approved definition of a "Highly Qualified Teacher."
     
  10. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    May 14, 2008

    As a person with a Social Studies Ed degree, I can understand your confusion since there are so many content areas within the Social Studies. I think you will only get your answer from someone in your Dept of Ed. In Indiana, we must concentrate on at least three areas while obtaining our degree. So my license reads, Secondary Ed Social Studies - US and World History, Geography, Government and Econ. So while my degree say Social Studies, I am only highly qualified in those areas. If I were to make a guess, you would only be highly qualified to teach any and all histories and soc. But I think I have learned from this site, every single state is different.
     

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