Well aint that a kick in the teeth!!!!

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by kevmic28, Mar 30, 2012.

  1. kevmic28

    kevmic28 Companion

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    I have been subbing in a district since I graduated in December. I finally got in at a school that the principal is looking to fill 6 to 7 positions for next year. Im actually doing a 2 week LTS as sort of a trial interview and I find out today that the district is pushing through bilingual classes in the 3 schools that dont already have it. Instead of phasing it in, they are throwing teachers to the wolves by doing PreK, Kinder, and 1st all the first year. So thats 9 teachers that will be replaced by bilingual teachers and be put into any available positions at the other schools. Does not look good for me getting a position at this district. I have applied at every district in the DFW area and actually straight down I 35 to Corpus Christi. Im willing to relocate but cant seem to catch a break. I retired from my first career and went back to college to have a better future. 3 years ago it looked good but now I dont know.
    Im a 37 year old male and have custody of my 11 year old son. The teachers like me, the principals like me, the students like me. What do I have to do to find a job.
     
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    It sounds like maybe you need to get a bilingual certification or relocate out of state.
     
  4. kevmic28

    kevmic28 Companion

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    yeah that sounds easy. It would take years for me to become fluent enough in Spanish to be able to teach it. So what state do you work in so I can move there???
     
  5. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    It would take years, yes, but it's not too late to start.

    You can try moving to Southern Nevada. What are you licensed to teach?
     
  6. kevmic28

    kevmic28 Companion

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    EC-6 generalist and ell cert.
     
  7. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    It's not going to be easy to find a job as an elementary teacher. Are you willing to expand your license to include secondary subjects?
     
  8. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    My district was hiring last year, but not until late July and August.
     
  9. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    I'm in South Florida; my district is always hiring. 5 full time elem. positions open right now, with several LTS positions as well.
     
  10. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    In this part of the country at least, the job market for elementary ed has ALWAYS been brutal. There are simply far, far more candidates than available jobs.

    Caesar's suggestion was a good one. (Though she teaches Latin, so relocating to her neighborhood might not solve your problem.) In a job market flooded with applicants, the trick is to offer something that other applicants don't. While I'm not in Texas, everything that I've read on these forums seem to indicate that knowing Spanish is increasingly important in an applicant. Someone mentioned Secondary Ed. If there's any way you can get certified in Chem, Physics or math, I think you'll probably have a much easier time finding a job... those tend to be the high demand areas in much of the country.

    You said the principals like you, so apparently you interview well. That's huge. So now you just have to find that something that gets you to the interview stage. How's your cover letter? Does it leave the reader wanting to meet you? Does your resume highlight your strengths?

    You mention a previous career. What can you take from that career and bring to teaching that sets you apart? Just about any career has some transferable skills, we just need to find out which ones you possess.

    It won't be easy, but you already know that. Even before the economy crashed, elementary ed was an impossible job market-- throw in thousands of teachers laid off, and the picture isn't pretty. But every year teachers DO get hired. The trick is in finding out what you offer that the competition doesn't.

    Good luck!
     
  11. donziejo

    donziejo Devotee

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    Mar 31, 2012

    In central Mississippi in my district we have posted in my district 4 openings for elementary teachers


    I am typing from my phone. I'm not very good at it:D
     
  12. kevmic28

    kevmic28 Companion

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    My cover letter and resume are very good. Before I left college I sat down with several professors and they helped me write them. They are all former principals, so I believe I am on the righ track there.
    I worked for an airline for 13 years an was able to take an early retirement package after the company recovered from bankruptcy. I managed a crew of 3 to 4 men on a daily basis.
    Im not opposed to learning another language but it wont help me right now. The bigest issue I see while subbing in bilingual classes is the fact that they are not actually bilingual. They are supposed to be 90/10 ratio and gradually changing to 50/50 by fifth grade. But in all the classes I have been in they all seem to be 100% Spanish.
    Spanish in not the only language spoken here in my ditrict. There is a large population of Vietnamese Korean, and Egyptian people.

    As far as other certs. I really dont want to work with the older kids. The attitude and disrespect is just too much. My patience and my passion are for working with the little children. I have subbed in junior high and high school and its just not for me.
    Im studying now to get my cert in phys ed.
     
  13. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Just a word of caution: the only area traditionally harder to break into than elementary ed is Phys Ed. Every wannabe professional athlete in the world tends to gravitate towards Phys Ed.

    Would you consider a cert in literacy or some other form of elementary ed?
     
  14. kevmic28

    kevmic28 Companion

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    Im actually working on my masters right in ele ed reading. Right now there are several ele ed phy ed positions available in my area.
     
  15. chasisaac

    chasisaac Comrade

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    Mar 31, 2012

    Move.

    There are two directions to go. One is east. Go into the Southern states. Look rural.

    The second is north and freeze your bippy off. WY, ND, WI, SD (me), NE, MT(really poor pay), ID are wanting teachers. The problem is really rural or worse: reservation. Keeping in mind when I say I rural I mean at least one hour from a Wal-Mart.

    I have found distance to a WM are a good indicator of real rural in America.

    I would avoid anywhere that less than two hours driving from NYC, DC, Philly, South Cali., South FL, Atlanta, and I sure a few other major citites can be tossed in there.

    One more thing. Whatever state you go to, see about adding certifications/endorsements, under this rule avoid MN (and others)

    I live in SD, 2 miles from a WM, so I am not that really really rural. I have social studies cert. I have added in the past year physical science and MS science, next comes math.
     
  16. tonysam

    tonysam Comrade

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    It's terrible all over the United States. The person who suggested southern Nevada is wrong, for Nevada is in the worst economic shape of any state in the United States, and their schools are not doing much in the way of hiring. You are competing in a very bad job market in education, and it won't get any better what with privatization efforts which treat teachers like so much garbage and are tossed out after two or three years and with budget cutbacks.

    I have to keep asking this question: WHY is anybody in this day and age bothering to go into the field? Why is anybody going into thousands of dollars in debt preparing for a "career" that if one can even secure a job will be tossed out in a year or two thanks to the wholesale gutting of teacher protections, or if one can't, be subbing for years on end in some hopeless quest to get a teaching job?
     
  17. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Because they're following THEIR dream, just as you chose to follow YOUR dream.
     
  18. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    I agree this would pretty much be an impossible goal, unless you possibly wanted to pick up and move to a spanish-speaking country (and commit to only speaking spanish while you're there) for a couple of years. I studied spanish all four years in high school plus 3 more in college (minored in it), always got A's and did well in my classes, and I am nowhere near fluent enough in it to even think about teaching in it. I even still have an interpreter for all of my parent meetings and phone calls. A lot of schools in my district have done that- I am lucky to be at one of the very few schools in the district that still doesn't require teachers to be bilingual. I second what another poster said about moving. There are places where the job market is better (maybe not GOOD, but BETTER), and certainly many places who would love to have a male elementary teacher. That alone puts you ahead of the pack with applications.
     
  19. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Dude.

    Calm yourself.

    The OP asked where I worked at so that he could move there. I'm not "wrong" for saying where I worked at.

    Nevada isn't in great shape, it's true. Even so, Clark County is a huge district with hundreds of thousands of students who all need teachers. The district does hire every year. Every single year. I know this because I live and work here.

    It seems like you're really negative about teachers and teaching. Maybe a teacher forum isn't the right place for you. #friendlysuggestions
     
  20. mcqxu

    mcqxu Comrade

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    No doubt that learning a second language is TOUGH and takes a long time, but I can't imagine adding a physical ed certification will make you indispensable anywhere, even if there are currently many of these openings in your area.

    In my TESOL certification program, I met MANY excellent and experienced teachers who were NOT bilingual. While you should definitely do everything you can to learn basic Spanish conversational skills (attend a Spanish conversational coffee hour, subscribe to Spanish TV stations etc.), also work on what you already have going for you - such as your ability to create a welcoming classroom environment for students who speak multiple languages, ability to address learning challenges of linguistically diverse population, etc. - these skills are a MUST, and I'm assuming your ELL certification helped you develop in these areas.

    Since they will eventually be following a 50/50 model, there clearly will be a place for teachers who speak and teach in English. Make yourself indispensable by being the one who clearly connects with all students and their families.
     
  21. PinkCupcake

    PinkCupcake Cohort

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    Sounds like you are in an area close to me. My district MIGHT have some openings coming up. I can pm you if you'd like. It can be tough getting hired in DFW districts as well.
     
  22. kevmic28

    kevmic28 Companion

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    Please do. :)
     

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