Weird book rituals

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by Miss J. Pre-K, Dec 13, 2009.

  1. Miss J. Pre-K

    Miss J. Pre-K Comrade

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    Dec 13, 2009

    Whenever we read a book as a whole class, I'm supposed to be pointing out various things about a book, including the parts of the book, the title, author, and illustrator, as well as discussing things about what happens in the book.

    Every single time, it never fails, my class yells out, "Is it a boy or a girl?" when I tell who the author and illustrator are. I've never had a class do this or heard about this. It's not really relevant to the book and it's getting to be disruptive. I've tried my "grab your words, catch them, put them back in your mouth" and "now it's my turn to talk" and just telling them it's a boy/girl and then ignoring it. Nothing is working so far. How do I get them to stop?

    They're usually pretty attentive until near the end of the book, when I have one or two yell out "the end", even if it's not. How do I put an end to this as well?

    I don't want to be Scrooge and I want to encourage discussion about books, but arrrgh, this is about to get to me.
     
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  3. elliemay

    elliemay Rookie

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    Dec 14, 2009

    This is a tough one. I think I would keep reminding them of your listening rules before even picking up a book. They should know the parts of the book by now (if you are doing this most of the time) and I would "quiz" them when introducing a book. Instruct them that they must raise their hand and be called on to answer.


    I know it can be aggravating when you are trying to begin to read, but I think I would just let the boy/girl thing slide. If you just go ahead and tell them or let them guess which it is, maybe they will get tired of it. It could lead to introductions of letters (what does this name begin with, sound like,etc. Also, because the holiday break is soon, maybe they will forget when they come back. :) (Although now it is probably part of their "routine" to ask.)

    Now, the yelling out of "the end"---whew, I don't think I have a suggestion except to keep reminding them of their listening skills. Do they do this when anyone reads to them or just you?

    My class this year has a REALLY hard time listening and it is a daily issue. I hope to come up with some ideas for after the holidays. Hang in there...I know it is hard dealing with these kinds of things...

    Hope this helps in some way...
     
  4. newbie87

    newbie87 Comrade

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    Dec 14, 2009

    I wish the kids I had were this attentive. They loose interest way too easily and my mentor teacher doesn't point out the parts of the book, nor did she in September, and doesn't mention the name of the author(s). There's a fairly large number of kids who call out and make it crystal clear they are not paying attention. They also try to grab the book if they're sitting close enough. I just try to remind them, when I read, it's time to listen. Sometimes, it works, but not all the time.
     
  5. Miss J. Pre-K

    Miss J. Pre-K Comrade

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    Dec 15, 2009

    I do have to say, my class is very attentive when they want to be. We've even started looking at the opening and closing pages of the book (usually colored or designed paper) and they'll notice it's the same front and back. Sometimes they'll notice when the picture on the cover occurs inside the book. We're making up stories about books, going over the reading center during center time, just enjoying books in general.

    It's just that yelling out that gets to me.

    Generally, I'm the only one reading to the whole group, unless I'm out or in a meeting, then my assistant reads. They do it with her too.

    I think I might start saying "The person that wrote this book is a girl/boy. His/her name is ______," maybe I can get it in before they start yelling.
     
  6. newbie87

    newbie87 Comrade

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    Dec 15, 2009

    Overall, they sound pretty good. I don't know if I'm saying this because I'm trying to cope, but I think children under 5, are just not wired to sit still and be quiet for too long. I like your idea. I was also thinking if you find them calling out too much maybe you can read a line per page or sum up, you have to know the book pretty well though, what happens on each page. I notice my mentor does this the kids don't want to sit still and be quiet.
     
  7. greengables

    greengables Rookie

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    Dec 15, 2009

    I always remind mine that the 1st time I read a story they are to just LISTEN. The second time is when we can talk about it. I'm still reminding them each and every time. :p
     
  8. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Dec 15, 2009

    Yeah, I would start off with, "the man/woman who wrote this book is _________."
     
  9. mrgrinch09

    mrgrinch09 Comrade

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    Dec 15, 2009

    With the group I've got this year, I've given up on requiring them to be quiet during story time. Asking this group to not talk is like asking fish not to swim.

    I don't take it personally, I just chalk it up to this group is really interested in stories and has an uncontrollable urge to participate during story time.
     
  10. vannapk

    vannapk Groupie

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    Dec 16, 2009

    Oh, good idea SpecialPreskoo! You could tell them it's a game and say "The person who wrote this book is _______, she's (or he's) the author. Can anybody tell me what the author does?" I do that except I don't include he or she and it works pretty well. If they say "is it a boy or girl?" after you say he/she then say "you weren't listening. Of course, you would have to do a lesson about he/she before all that.
     
  11. Dzenna

    Dzenna Groupie

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    Dec 17, 2009

    I would use the children's curiosity and excitement to your benefit. Say something like, " Now, I want you to listen really carefully to the author's name. If you think it is a boy, quietly touch your nose."

    Have the children respond in a way that meets your style and time constraints. The children are listening and responding, but you have control.
     

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